Bell, Book and Camera: A Critical History of Witches in American Film and Television

Bell, Book and Camera: A Critical History of Witches in American Film and Television

by Heather Greene

Paperback(Critical)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781476662527
Publisher: McFarland & Company, Incorporated Publishers
Publication date: 06/13/2018
Edition description: Critical
Pages: 242
Product dimensions: 7.00(w) x 9.90(h) x 0.30(d)

About the Author

Heather Greene is a freelance writer, journalist, and managing editor of The Wild Hunt, a news journal for the Pagan, Witchcraft, Heathen communities worldwide. She lives in Atlanta, Georgia.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents


Acknowledgments  vi

A Woman Unleashed: An Introduction  1

One ◆ In the Beginning (1896–1919)  13

Two ◆ Wild Women, Vamps and Green Skin (1919–1939)  36

Three ◆ War and Weird Women (1939–1950)  65

Four ◆ Toward a New Hollywood (1951–1967)  89

Five ◆ Horror and the Fantastic (1968–1982)  119

Six ◆ The Satanic Panic (1983–1999)  149

Seven ◆ A New Witch Order (2000–2016)  180

A Woman Unleashed: Revisited  212

Chapter Notes  215

Bibliography  221

Index  227

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Bell, Book and Camera: A Critical History of Witches in American Film and Television 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
In a well researched and long overdo study of the witch’s place in American entertainment culture Ms. Greene takes us on a sweeping tour from the nascent film industry of the late 1800s to the full up cinematic powers of late 20th century Hollywood, defining the witch’s many character constructions and evolution. It’s about crones, wild women, vamps, Victorian clown witches, teen witches and more who were harmless, sometimes threatening, or fully evil to the core. We go from learning how through a male lens that women who lived on the edges of society were redeemable only through male guidance all the way to modern witches, women in full, fully independent and comfortable with their knowledge and power to express themselves without patriarchal judgment. It’s an important story of feminine self-determination and equality. Ignore first edition typos because it’s a great source for students of film, women’s studies or aficionados of the genre. Enjoy!