Ben-Hur

Ben-Hur

Paperback

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780895264169
Publisher: Regnery Publishing
Publication date: 01/25/1998
Series: Gateway Movie Classics Series
Pages: 588
Product dimensions: 5.46(w) x 8.26(h) x 1.34(d)

About the Author

Lewis Wallace was born in 1827, in Brookville, Indiana, the son of David (the future governor of Indiana) and Esther Test Wallace (the daughter of Indiana’s first U.S. congressman). He left school at the age of sixteen, and worked as an assistant in his father’s law firm until the outbreak of the Mexican War. Wallace joined the fighting as a second lieutenant in the First Regiment of Indiana Volunteers, but did not see much action. During this time, he worked on his first novel. After the war, Wallace returned to the law and was admitted to the Indiana Bar. He was eventually elected to the state senate, where he served until the outbreak of the American Civil War in 1861, when he resumed soldiering. He became the youngest man to hold the rank of major general. Continuing in service to his country, Wallace served on the military commission responsible for trying and sentencing those involved in the assassination of President Lincoln, and aided Benito Juarez in trying to establish a constitutional government in Mexico. In 1878, Wallace became the territorial governor of New Mexico, and during his 3-year tenure wrote Ben-Hur (1880). The rest of Wallace’s life saw the publication of lesser literary efforts, and the appointment as minister of Turkey. He died in Crawfordsville, Indiana, in 1905.
Tim LaHaye is a noted author, minister, and nationally recognized speaker on Bible prophecy. He is the founder and president of Tim LaHaye Ministries, and the cofounder of the Pre-Trib Research Center, established for the purpose of exposing ministers to Bible prophecy. He holds a doctor of ministry from Western Theological Seminary and a doctor of literature from Liberty University. A pastor for thirty-nine years, LaHaye has written more than fifty nonfiction books and co-authored the Left Behind, the most successful Christian fiction venture in publishing history, with Jerry Jenkins.

Table of Contents

Introduction vii(17)
Note on the Text xxiv(1)
Select Bibliography xxv(2)
A Chronology of Lew Wallace xxvii
BEN-HUR
1(521)
Explanatory Notes 522

Reading Group Guide

One of the most popular American novels of all time, General Lew Wallace’s Ben-Hur vividly reimagines the mighty Roman Empire and the rise of Christianity. The saga of Judah Ben-Hur’s spiritual journey from slavery to vengeance to redemption is both a vivid historical adventure and a powerful story of one man’s religious awakening. As Blake Allmendinger writes in his Introduction to this Modern Library Paperback Classic, “Ben-Hur has endured for more than one hundred years because it offers something for everyone. The story of the Jewish hero Ben-Hur, his conflict with the Roman warrior Messala, and his conversion to Christianity at the foot of the Cross, combines adventure, sentimentality, athletic spectacle, and religious devotion.”

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Ben-Hur (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 102 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I decided to read only well-written and important works during this Millenial Year. I picked up the 'Focus on the Family' publication of Ben Hur as I was exiting our library. I did not know I had just picked up the novel of my life. This book is suplative in every way-wonderful plot, incredible characterizations, historically accurate, and even life changing. General Lew Wallace wrote this incredible work in 1880, and I don't believe this novel could be written by today's writers. There are some of the most perfectly written sentences I have ever read, every line comparable to fine wine that must be sipped slowly for best effect rather than gulped like present-day works. It took me a full month of pleasure to finish this fine work. It can be enjoyed by Christian and non-Christian alike, and will cause those who believe to believe even stronger, while those unfamiliar or doubtful of the Good News of Christ will be quickened spiritually. This book is gigantic in scope and life changing in effect. By the way, I've never seen the movie, but I'm going to check it tonight>>>
Roger Beede More than 1 year ago
I loved this book from beginning to end! It is much better than the movie version!
ML100 More than 1 year ago
Reading the book has filled in the movie. I really appreciated the author's use of language and sentence structure.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Excellent book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Though the movie Ben Hur is good the book is even better
SANDYSZ More than 1 year ago
What can one say about a book that is a classic. (Nothing)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Although I loved the story, the description at some points seemed too heavy and I started skimming over certain parts. Also there are many errors in the text and it was very difficult to read. But overall a great story that I would recommend:)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
THE BOOK IS FULL OF MISSPELLED WORDS AND WEIRD SYMBOLS THAT HAVE NO MEANING WHAT SO EVER.IT IS HARD TO GET THE FULL MEANING OF THE BOOK. WOULD NOT RECOMMEND ANYONE READ THIS PARTICULAR BOOK.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Read it a long time a go, but this time I appreciated it more. So beautiful!
charlie68 on LibraryThing 24 days ago
Better than the movie.
john257hopper on LibraryThing 24 days ago
I have to say I did not find this novel as moving as I did Quo Vadis, that other 19th century novel about early Christianity. It rather dragged in places and some of the characters seemed rather flat. It covers a longer period of time than the famous film, as the first 50 pages concern the birth of Christ and in particular the progress of the Magi. As for other comparisons, the "real" Ben Hur sounds nothing like Charlton Heston, not only physically, but also in that here in the novel his desire for vengeance on Messala comes out more strongly as the chief personal drive of his life. Particular moving moments were the immediate aftermath of the accident that led to Ben Hur's arrest and that of his family and the later discovery of the appalling treatment and condition of his mother (unnamed for some reason) and sister Tirzah. In sum, I'm glad I read this novel, but it was a bit of a struggle in parts.
susanbevans on LibraryThing 26 days ago
Lew Wallace's Ben-Hur: A Tale of Christ, is the story of the life of Jesus told within the exciting tale of Judah of the House of Hur. Judah is a Prince of Jerusalem betrayed by his childhood friend Messala, and sent to spend the rest of his life in servitude on a Roman ship. After three years, Judah miraculously saves the life of a rich Roman tribune, and embarks on a journey of vengeance that ends in redemption for himself and his family. I know that's an incredibly loose synopsis of the novel, but I don't want to give any of the good stuff away - in case there is someone out there who hasn't read the book or seen the movie.Although Ben-Hur was published in 1880, I found it astonishingly readable. I wasn't constantly stumbling over the language or wondering when the story was going to "pick up." Ben-Hur is full of detail - nearly everything is described in grand scale. This is not a quick read, but the continual movement toward the climax kept me turning pages. The novel itself is charming and incredibly entertaining. Full of the kind of larger-than-life characters you would expect, Ben-Hur is a wonderful historical novel. After almost 130 years, it remains a powerful and moving novel. It contains some historical information, but is also rich with detail and action packed. With vivid imagery, lavish settings, and affecting characters, Ben-Hur is a must read!
MrsLee on LibraryThing 26 days ago
A young Jewish man clashes with the Roman Empire. His struggles embitter him until he is able to find the comfort of faith. Lots of action in this book. It has been some time since I read this book, but I remember putting it down at the end with a great deal of satisfaction with the read.
RChurch on LibraryThing 29 days ago
First published in 1880's, the language is a bit flowery. Phrases such as "O Reader" and "Thou wilt not" give the book an archaic feel. The author seems to have borrowed from "The Merchant of Venice" and "Ivanhoe" among other sources. The middle drags somewhat because of too much dialogue. Predictable story to anyone with a passing knowledge of the New Testament. On the positive side, I found Book First to be an excellent account of the events leading up to the arrival of the Magi from the East. If you like Christian literature, this might be a book for you.
MrTowler More than 1 year ago
I decided to read the book after having seen the 2016 movie version. That movie was very different from the 50's movie with Charlton Heston. About the only thing they had in common was the chariot race. But even they were in different countries. When I was about half way through reading the book, I ran into the Latin teacher at the town's high school. He asked me what I was reading. When I told him "Ben Hur" he cringed. I said, "I know." The book was a very slow, very wordy exercise in forcing myself to finish. It is hard to believe that it was the most popular novel in America from its publication to the release of "Gone With the Wind." It is not badly written. It is just a bit heavy-handed. My biggest problem with the book is the complete lack of believable characterization. The incredibly important character of Iras, the daughter of Balthasar, (yes, that Balthasar), is despicable but Ben Hur is in love with her and never sees how rotten she is. She invites him to a house for what I suppose Ben Hur supposed was an assignation. He goes there and two guys show up to assassinate him. He kills one of them and convinces the other one to let him go. But he never connects the assassination attempt with the woman who invited him and never showed up. There is also the issue of Ben Hur fighting for revenge against Messala and the Romans in general. Well, Messala is done about half way through the book and Ben Hur and Esther end up living in Ben Hur's Roman mansion outside of Rome. I guess he didn't hate Romans anymore. Then there are the two armies he forms to fight the Romans. Only 2 guys show up when he calls them, and he and the author pretty much forget about them for the rest of the book. After I finished reading the book, I watched both the 1925 silent with Roman Novarro and the Heston version. The best is the Heston version. The characterization and the story in this version are the best. The 1925 version is surprisingly good, but Iras is just as badly drawn as she is the book. She doesn't even show up in the Heston version. I do not regret having read this book. I have certainly read worse. But unless you have a great deal of time, I wouldn't recommend it. I must also say, that even though I am not a Christian, I was not bothered by the religious stuff at all. I just wish there had been less of it. The first 1/4 of the book is about the Magi. The book would have been just as good without that section.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is such a cool story. I do agree that it is slow though
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Educative
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I got this book as a free nook book. It's a "classic" so I figured, "why not?" This book is way beyond overly-descriptive. I found myself actually talking to my book, "I don't really care what the camels are wearing! Get on with it!" The main character of the story isn't even mentioned until page 62 of 435. It took me about 2-3 weeks of forcing myself to read this. If it had been written in 100 pages it probably would have been tolerable. Save yourself some time and watch the old movie version starring Charlton Heston.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My friend's great great grandfather wrote this book.
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