Berlin Diary: The Journal of a Foreign Correspondent 1934-1949

Berlin Diary: The Journal of a Foreign Correspondent 1934-1949

by William L. Shirer

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Product Details

BN ID: 2940013238596
Publisher: RosettaBooks
Publication date: 08/23/2011
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 648
Sales rank: 219,170
File size: 757 KB

About the Author

William Shirer (1904-1993) was originally a foreign correspondent for the Chicago Tribune and was the first journalist hired by Edward R. Murrow for what would become a team of journalists for CBS radio. Shirer distinguished himself and quickly became known for his broadcasts from Berlin during the rise of the Nazi dictatorship through the first year of World War II. Shirer was the first of "Edward R. Murrow's Boys" - broadcast journalists - who provided news coverage during World War II and afterward. It was Shirer who broadcast the first uncensored eyewitness account of the annexation of Austria. Shirer is best known for his books The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich which won the National Book Award and Berlin Diary.

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Berlin Diary: The Journal of a Foreign Correspondent 1934-1949 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a perfect companion to Shirer's famous "Rise and Fall of the Third Reich". It's a personal exposition of a professional sensitive man during the sickest national disease that any nation ever inflicted on the whole world. Readers need to keep the knowledge of the foul and disgusting behavior of an insane leader and his adoring followers.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
An outstanding diary from a mam who was there. If you like WWII history, you will enjoy this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you are very interested in the behind the scenes life of American war correspondent in 1930s to early 1940s Germany and Europe then I recommend this book to you. It gets long and at times reads like an extended footnote but for the WWII reader I imagine it is a classic.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
as a somewhat historical buff on WWII, I love this book. So many little tid bits that show how nasty and cunning the krauts were. Worth reading today for a good look at the past.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago