Beyond the Sky and the Earth: A Journey into Bhutan

Beyond the Sky and the Earth: A Journey into Bhutan

by Jamie Zeppa
4.5 17

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Beyond the Sky and the Earth: A Journey into Bhutan 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is my favorite gift. A beautiful book about Bhutan and Buddhism.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was great. I've been reading travel essays for several years, and this is one of the best. I just loved it and could hardly put it down. totally engrossing, totally honest from author - an awesome read!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Zeppa's account is deeply personal and amazingly intimate, yet she also imparts her love for the country of Bhutan. The reader experiences her journey in a meaningful, real and wholly unique way. A travel memoir that reads like a novel. You will be changed by reading this book. It is simply incredible.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A book full of laughter and tears. A journey into the soul of a woman and a people. The discriptions she uses for her experience in Bhutan have you longing for more the entire book. This is a book that everyone should read and anyone would love.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book because it was on my reading list for a Bhutan and Burma Suitcase Seminar that I am attending in December '03/January '04. I found this book to be extremely interesting, and I had a very hard time putting it down, so I finished it in less than a day. It also included Buddhism, which will be helpful for my trip as well. All in all, a great read!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was hard to put down. Learning about a country I previously had known NOTHING about through the author's honest and often funny experiences was fantastic. I got an idea of the beauty, and also the frustration of the political situation, of Bhutan. Anyone who has gone to a foreign country to learn, live, etc. will appreciate and love this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I greatly enjoyed reading this story, and am grateful Ms. Zeppa was kind enough to share her very personal experiences with us. Beyond the Sky and the Earth is a memoir in which Ms. Zeppa examines a very special time of growth and learning in her life. She also describes in wonderful detail life in the enchanting mountains of Bhutan. While times there were sometimes hard, and the people materially poor, this story is very uplifting. The only saddness I felt while reading this book was when I realized I had read more of it than there was left to read. I did not want this book to end. The endind did leave more to be desired, which I would love to see in the form of a sequel picking up where she left off. The choices she made surely led to a whole new set of challenges.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I run in "We arent running away we are staying here!" I get water rubbing your back
DoranneLongPTMS More than 1 year ago
I thoroughly enjoyed traveling to Bhutan with Jamie. She helped me to see the great beauty, and the simplicity, of the country and her life there. With great skill, and without judgement, she also compared and contrasted the sometimes conflicting worlds.
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songcatchers More than 1 year ago
"Her tale is part love story, part history lesson and part Buddhism 101." -Mademoiselle Beyond the Sky and the Earth is a beautifully written 'journey into Bhutan'. Armchair travel is a favorite genre of mine and Jamie Zeppa does a wonderful job at making the reader feel like part of her journey. Jamie, a Canadian, takes a two year teaching post in far away Bhutan leaving her home and fiance behind. Culture shock hits her hard in this country where people only have what they need. She questions herself and wonders why in the world she took this post and how she can possibly make it here for two years. Then the balance starts to slowly shift and eventually she wonders how she can ever return to Canada and the world where people have more than they need and are the worse for it. She ends up extending her teaching post because she can't bear to leave this country. Along her journey she learns a lot about herself and a country she begins to call home. This is such a beautifully descriptive travelogue/memoir. I loved every sentence. ".....her squeamishness about the place turned to love, addiction and lust, for a landscape, a lifestyle, a people and a man...." - Mademoiselle
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Zeppa's experiences of traveling to, and living in a country few westerns have ever even heard of let one been to, had the potential to be a captivating and illuminating narrative. While we get that in the book's first section in her tales of culture shock and adjustment, the second part goes woefully wrong. Here the author starts to question some to the western values she left behind in Canada while then using those same values to question some aspects of Bhutanese culture, including some aspects of how the school where she taught are run. Far worse she begins an affair with two of her students and her self absorption leads her not to question the throughly unprofessional aspects of this conduct but only to worry about what the consequences would be should she get caught. Nothing about this conflict prevents her from continuing one of the relationships and getting pregnant from it. By this point the self absorption of the book has long since overtaken any insight into Bhutanese culture that it is difficult not to get the decided impression that the author's conversion to Buddhism has simply turned into another one of those privileged who have done little but turn Buddhism into the latest trendy fad. Pass.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Rather than a book about the nation of Bhutan, its culture, society and people, this book is more a personal memoir, with the nation of Bhutan serving as a backdrop to the authors rather increasing self centeredness. The first half of the book does deal with many of the former issues, and while the author is to be appreciated in the second half for not painting an overly sentimental portrait of the country when she discusses the ethnic violence that has sometimes plagued the country, her personal and shockingly unprofessional behavior which leads her to sleep with two of her students seeps this book into an excessive amount of self centeredness that ultimately sink