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The Big Show
     

The Big Show

by Don Trembath, Don Tremblath
 
Sidneyís mother, Tizzy, wants him to get his act together before he turns thirteen in two weeks. He decides to show her he has not been wasting his life. Charlie wants to show people that thereís more to him than just his big mouth and that he can take something seriously for a change. And Jeffrey is still trying to prove, mainly to his mother, that

Overview

Sidneyís mother, Tizzy, wants him to get his act together before he turns thirteen in two weeks. He decides to show her he has not been wasting his life. Charlie wants to show people that thereís more to him than just his big mouth and that he can take something seriously for a change. And Jeffrey is still trying to prove, mainly to his mother, that heís not a wimp. So when sensei Duncan announces that The Big Show Sparring Tournament is coming up, the timing couldnít be betterÖThe Big Show continues the story of the three small-town misfits introduced in Frog Face and the Three Boys, One Missing Finger and The Bachelors. After learning how to cope with conflict, young love and responsibility, Charlie, Sidney and Jeffrey are now learning about trial by fire and getting the job done.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Sydney, Charlie and Jeffrey, three 12-year-old boys, have developed friendships through their karate classes. Each boy looks to karate to help him deal with personal issues: Sydney, a hothead, wants to prove that he is capable and mature; overweight Charlie wants to be taken seriously; and quiet but talented Jeffrey wants his mom to recognize that he is growing up. All three look to an upcoming tournament—the "Big Show"—to help them achieve their personal goals. The book, part of "The Black Belt Series," focuses on an untraditional sport, which is refreshing, and the author includes interesting details about karate and karate competition. The characters are vivid and well-drawn, and Trembath does a good job of capturing realistic dialogue of the age group. Unfortunately, too much of the book is dialogue. Although comical at times, it often slows down the pace of the book. In addition, the uniformly negative interpretation of the boys' mothers borders on stereotype. Nevertheless, Trembath has a good eye for detail and a good idea, which should interest some middle grade readers. 2003, Orca Book Publishers, Ages 9 to 12.
— Barbara Allen Burke
KLIATT
Charlie, Sidney, and Jeffrey all need to prove to their mothers that they are not going to go through life as failures. Charlie has spent his first 12 years fearing his sister; Sidney is a kid who likes to get in trouble; Jeffrey has lived in the shadow of his overprotective mother. Sensei Duncan has the answer to their problem; the annual Big Show Sparring Tournament. Each of the three resolves to do his best to win the event. Of course, getting their mothers to sign the form and pay the fee is quite a challenge in itself. An unknown factor is Derek, a new kid who auditions for Sensei to gain entry into the tournament. As the tournament proceeds Charlie is the first one out, but he has proved to himself and the others that he can stick to his plan. Derek has been acting like head hits have really made contact, which causes his opponents to lose points as that is against the rules. Sidney puts aside his drive to win to help Jeffrey against Derek. This book is an easy read and, as popular as karate is with YAs, should be purchased. It's not heavy on karate lingo, so readers who don't take lessons would enjoy this book as well. (The Black Belt Series). KLIATT Codes: J; Recommended for junior high school students. 2003, Orca, 128p.,
— Stacey Conrad

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781551432663
Publisher:
Orca Book Publishers
Publication date:
01/01/2003
Series:
The Black Belt series , #4
Pages:
144
Product dimensions:
4.25(w) x 7.00(h) x 0.30(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Don Trembath began writing for keeps when he was 13 years old. He wrote horror stories at night and read them to his little brother as he tried to fall asleep.
"Every morning I'd ask him if he'd had a nightmare and he'd say, 'No. Was I supposed to?' I soon abandoned horror stories and moved on to comedy. I read those stories to him and would ask him in the morning. 'Did you laugh?' One day he said, 'No, but I had a nightmare.'"

Don was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba on May 22, 1963--the third youngest of four boys. In the winter he played hockey and in the summer football, baseball, and soccer. Between games, he went to school. At the age of 14, Don moved with his family to Alberta. He graduated from Paul Kane High School in St. Albert and went to the University of Alberta to study English. He has written for weekly and daily newspapers, local and national magazines, and a host of trade publications.

Don's first book, The Tuesday Cafe, was published in 1996. Since then he has written nine others, with two more, Daydream Believer and Hypnotized published in 2007. Don also teaches writing at MacEwan College in Edmonton, and regularly visit schools and libraries across the country.

Don currently lives in the town of Morinville, Alberta with his wife, Lisa, their three kids, three laid back cats, and their neighbor's big dog.

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