The Big Switch: Rewiring the World, from Edison to Google

The Big Switch: Rewiring the World, from Edison to Google

by Nicholas Carr
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Overview

The Big Switch: Rewiring the World, from Edison to Google by Nicholas Carr

“Magisterial. . . . Draws an elegant and illuminating parallel between the late-19th-century electrification of America and today’s computing world.”—Salon

Hailed as “the most influential book so far on the cloud computing movement” (Christian Science Monitor), The Big Switch makes a simple and profound statement: Computing is turning into a utility, and the effects of this transition will ultimately change society as completely as the advent of cheap electricity did. In a new chapter for this edition that brings the story up-to-date, Nicholas Carr revisits the dramatic new world being conjured from the circuits of the “World Wide Computer.”

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780393067873
Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date: 01/19/2009
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 304
Sales rank: 776,375
File size: 475 KB

About the Author

Nicholas Carr is the author of The Shallows, a Pulitzer Prize finalist, and The Glass Cage, among other books. Former executive editor of the Harvard Business Review, he has written for The Atlantic, the New York Times, and Wired. He lives in Boulder, Colorado.

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The Big Switch: Rewiring the World, from Edison to Google 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
Booknut62 More than 1 year ago
Nicholas Carr's book is a fascinating look at where the World Wide Web and related technologies just might be taking us. He helps readers see future possibilities and possible pitfalls in the world's evolution toward what he calls the "World Wide Computer." While the Web has brought freedom and possibility, Carr dares to point out that it might also be bringing economic inequity and a questions about personal privacy and security. According to Carr, there is great promise in the "World Wide Computer" but perhaps we need to be more sober in our advocacy for its place in the world.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book illustrates the progression towards centralization of computing tasks on the Internet by comparing it to the establishment of electric grids early in the early 20th century. It is a good analogy. It is also a little scary to think that all kinds of our personal information could end up stored on computers over which we have no control, as anyone who has looked at Google's "web History" feature will see.
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Very convincing and clearly gets the point across. IT has matured enough that platforms are almost interchangeable; a sign for cutting cost. Engineers (we) need to be more business oriented than ever before to remain relevant to a company's business strategy.