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Black Identity: Rhetoric, Ideology, and Nineteenth-Century Black Nationalism
     

Black Identity: Rhetoric, Ideology, and Nineteenth-Century Black Nationalism

by Dexter B Gordon, Oliver Harris
 
Gordon (communication, theater arts, African American studies, U. of Puget Sound) explores the early rhetorical formation and functioning of the ideology of black nationalism in the U.S. Coverage includes theories about rhetoric, race, and alienation, and the problems these concepts create; oppression in antebellum America, and the rhetorical means used by

Overview

Gordon (communication, theater arts, African American studies, U. of Puget Sound) explores the early rhetorical formation and functioning of the ideology of black nationalism in the U.S. Coverage includes theories about rhetoric, race, and alienation, and the problems these concepts create; oppression in antebellum America, and the rhetorical means used by Anglo-Americans to defend slavery; an examination of the foundation documents of black nationalism; the contestation over blackness as evidenced in the Whipper-Sidney debate of 1840-41; the efforts of black abolitionists toward self-definition and self-determination; and the implications of the study for rhetorical theory and for an understanding of black nationalism. Annotation ©2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Gordon makes a more than adequate contribution to the existing body of work on African American rhetoric in the discipline. His style is clear and accessible, and there are some moments that verge on poetic.”—Mark McPhail, Miami University

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780809324859
Publisher:
Southern Illinois University Press
Publication date:
02/26/2003
Edition description:
1st Edition
Pages:
280
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.75(d)
Lexile:
1470L (what's this?)

Meet the Author

Dexter B. Gordon is a professor in the Department of Communication and Theatre Arts and director of the African American Studies Program at the University of Puget Sound. His “Struggle and Identity in Jamaican Talk,” published in Our Voices, won the 2000–2001 Best Book Chapter Award from the African American Communication and Culture Division and the Black Caucus of the National Communication Association.

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