ISBN-10:
0393314820
ISBN-13:
9780393314823
Pub. Date:
04/17/1996
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Black Majority: Negroes in Colonial South Carolina from 1670 through the Stono Rebellion

Black Majority: Negroes in Colonial South Carolina from 1670 through the Stono Rebellion

by Peter H. Wood

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Overview

Black Majority: Negroes in Colonial South Carolina from 1670 through the Stono Rebellion

A groundbreaking study of two cultures in early America.Black Majority won the Albert J. Beveridge Award of the American Historical Association.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780393314823
Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date: 04/17/1996
Edition description: REV
Pages: 384
Sales rank: 886,965
Product dimensions: 5.60(w) x 8.20(h) x 1.10(d)

About the Author

Peter H. Wood is professor of American history at Duke University.

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Black Majority: Negroes in Colonial South Carolina from 1670 through the Stono Rebellion 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In this intriguing study, Peter H. Wood tells the story of Blacks in South Carolina from the first British settlement in 1670 to the outbreak of the Stono Rebellion in 1739. White planters, eager to get rich in the new colony, at first welcomed Black enterprise. As Euro-Americans seized upon plantation agriculture, they increasingly tried to suppress Black initiative. With gifted style and well-researched scholarship, Wood conveys the steadily increasing tension that preceded the outbreak of rebellion.