Blind Spots: Becoming a Courageous, Compassionate, and Commissioned Church

Blind Spots: Becoming a Courageous, Compassionate, and Commissioned Church

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781433546235
Publisher: Crossway
Publication date: 04/30/2015
Series: Cultural Renewal
Pages: 128
Product dimensions: 5.20(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.50(d)

About the Author

Collin Hansen (MDiv, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School) serves as the editorial director for the Gospel Coalition. He previously worked as an associate editor for Christianity Today magazine and coedits the Cultural Renewal series with Tim Keller. He and his wife belong to Redeemer Community Church in Birmingham, Alabama, and he serves on the advisory board of Beeson Divinity School. You can follow him on Twitter at @collinhansen.

Collin Hansen (MDiv, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School) serves as the editorial director for the Gospel Coalition. He previously worked as an associate editor for Christianity Today magazine and coedits the Cultural Renewal series with Tim Keller. He and his wife belong to Redeemer Community Church in Birmingham, Alabama, and he serves on the advisory board of Beeson Divinity School. You can follow him on Twitter at @collinhansen.

Timothy J. Kelleris the founding pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian Church in New York. He is the best-selling author of The Prodigal God and The Reason for God.

Timothy J. Kelleris the founding pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian Church in New York. He is the best-selling author of The Prodigal God and The Reason for God.

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

“I would recommend any book Collin Hansen writes because he’s one of the most thoughtful and devout men I know. But when it’s a book about what full-orbed and united ministry looks like in a post-Christian culture, I enthusiastically recommend it. The church has a big job in this era, and Hansen’s book helps us face into it with courage, compassion, and conviction.”
Mark Galli, Editor, Christianity Today

“Collin Hansen is one of the best younger writers and thinkers in the Lord’s church today. Here he calls on followers of Jesus to manifest three marks, each of which is essential for full-orbed discipleship: holy boldness, loving kindness, and a gospel witness that crosses all bounds.”
Timothy George, Founding Dean, Beeson Divinity School; General Editor, Reformation Commentary on Scripture

“Courage to speak the truth, compassion to care for the broken and the oppressed, commissioned to evangelize and plant churches—but how often do all three of these commitments meld together, surfacing as unified Christian maturity in our churches? The simple thesis of this book is that eager submission to the Lord Jesus requires such a unified vision. To opt for only one of these commitments while dismissing those who opt for others is to turn aside from Scripture while flirting with sterility and ugliness.”
D. A. Carson, research professor of New Testament, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School; cofounder, The Gospel Coalition

“This book is Collin at his best—with humility and wit, he examines our moment in history and asks, ‘What is wrong with the church?’ Collin’s answer: I am. From that vantage point we begin to understand the beautiful thing God is doing in our generation, encompassing the various gifts he has placed in different Christian traditions. Collin is confident enough in his convictions to write with clarity and authority, yet humble enough to learn from others. This book not only provides insight, it models how to learn from others.”
J. D. Greear, pastor, The Summit Church, Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina; author, Gaining by Losing: Why the Future Belongs to Churches that Send

“Collin Hansen provides a valuable framework to the evangelical community to assess our witness and examine our weaknesses in light of Christ’s strengths. This book provides timely, helpful, winsome and wise counsel for believers seeking to encourage others and effectively expand their witness to a watching world.”
Ed Stetzer, Billy Graham Distinguished Chair for Church, Mission, and Evangelism, Wheaton College

“This is a little book that goes to war against all of the right enemies: self-righteousness, pomposity, and anger misplaced. Let’s face it. We've heard enough of our ‘heroes’ thunder from the mountaintops. We’ve planted accusatory fingers into the chests of our fellow believers. We’ve lamented a culture in decline. The truth be told, we’re sick of our own Twitter and Facebook feeds. In response to all of these, Collin Hansen knows the source of the problem. It’s you. It’s me. And in the spirit of Carl F. H. Henry’s ‘sober optimism,’ he points us back to the compassion of Christ for a remedy.”
Gregory Alan Thornbury, President, The King's College; author, Recovering Classic Evangelicalism

“Collin Hansen is a thoughtful, convictional, and wise leader. This book will help equip all of us to ask what we’re not seeing in the mission field around us, and in our own lives. You will find this book both convicting and rejuvenating at the same time.”
Russell D. Moore, president, Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention

“With this timely and challenging publication, Collin Hansen has provided churches with a scripturally based and balanced look at congregational life and ministry. Based on his discerning reflections and an open acknowledgment of his own imbalance and previous blind spots, Hansen offers us an invitation to join him on this important journey toward mature, healthy, and gospel-advancing congregational life. Carefully and thoughtfully written, the descriptors in the subtitle, ‘Courageous, Compassionate, and Commissioned,’ point us toward the need for collaborative service involving head, heart, hands, and feet. I am most pleased to recommend this important book.”
David S. Dockery, President, Trinity International University

“Collin Hansen offers the multifaceted evangelical church an incisive, sympathetic approach to self-diagnosis. Here is a hopeful vision in which our differences are not ultimately obstacles but opportunities for greater unity in courage, compassion, and commissioning. My hope is that this brief book will win a broad hearing.”
Stephen T. Um, Senior Minister, Citylife Presbyterian Church, Boston, Massachusetts; coauthor, Why Cities Matter

“What I most appreciate about Collin Hansen’s Blind Spots is the call to be generous with one another. Hansen’s three paradigmatic Christian camps will be instantly recognizable to anyone familiar with church culture. But he reframes these differences as opportunities for mutual instruction and learning rather than divisions to be reinforced. The result is a work that is at once refreshing and edifying and that will hopefully contribute to a more holistic Christlikeness throughout the body of the church.”
Tyler Wigg-Stevenson, Chair, Global Task Force on Nuclear Weapons, World Evangelical Alliance; author, The World Is Not Ours to Save

“In this insightful and challenging book, Collin Hansen charts a path for principled Christian collaboration in the midst of our post-Christian culture. Comparing ourselves to Christ more than to others, we will humbly work with fellow Christians and their multitude of gifts to further the purposes of God’s kingdom.”
Thomas S. Kidd, Distinguished Professor of History, Baylor University; author, The Great Awakening: The Roots of Evangelical Christianity in Colonial America

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Blind Spots: Becoming a Courageous, Compassionate, and Commissioned Church 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Danny_G More than 1 year ago
I was asked to review this book from Crossway to help get promote it. I was curious about it partly due to Tim Keller writing the forward and partly due its message. I found the message to be very powerful but not complex. Hansen has done well to show that the church needs to be courageous, compassionate, and commissioned. However, churches seem to lose sight of the fact that they must be all three. Hansen points this out and shows that Jesus was all three which is why He was received by those who needed Him. Hansen also shows that churches who strongly favor one attribute often have blind spots that cause issues in their churches and potentially issues with other churches. It was for this reason that Hansen has called the churches to recognize that blinds spots exist and how to address them. Grab a copy of this little book and see if you can recognize where you are.
michelemorin More than 1 year ago
The perversity of human nature shows up even in our strengths. If it is in my DNA to stand valiantly for truth, I will likely trample the unenlightened. If my heart bleeds for the underdog, I may provide for them a comfortable path to hell. If the world is my personal mission field, I may accomplish my goals by building a program of iron that even God himself would not choose to circumvent. In Blind Spots, Collin Hansen explores this tendency within the church, offering Christ as the plumb line, the point at which courage, compassion, and commission converge. The degree to which one deviates from His perfect unity is the degree to which one’s blind spots will hold sway. Could this be why those who believingly follow Jesus are viewed as oppressive or self-interested, when we set out to be ambassadors of peace? Depending on whom you ask, the failing of the church is either a lack of courage, a failure of compassion, or a breakdown in our resolution to fulfill the Great Commission. Rather than addressing the issue as a multiple choice quiz and re-casting Jesus in our own image, Collin Hansen urges believers of all stripes to represent the heart, the head, AND the hands of Jesus in our efforts to be salt and light.blind-spots-chart-07As the graphic demonstrates, no matter what strengths I bring to the kingdom of God, the little red wagon that follows behind me will tote a load of offsetting weaknesses that can serve only to undermine my best attempts at relevant ministry. Even in Scripture, Paul the Commissioned ran roughshod over John Mark in his impatience to win the lost, while Peter the Compassionate Compromiser feasted on BLT’s with the Gentiles, but tried to hold the line on the Law when in the company of the Judaizers. Having acknowledged our differences, we must embrace the opportunity they represent, resist the urge to divide, and chart a course that most nearly follows the way of Christ. Hanson probes with a question: “Can the love of Christ truly enable me to love a Christian who sins differently than I do?” Blind Spots helps us to see that abiding in Christ is the best defense against division, for it is a way that expects opposition but “seeks unity among believers for the sake of the world,” a unity that weeps over the world’s brokenness, but then stops to pick up the pieces. Following the tradition of William Wilberforce whose war on slavery should foreshadow a battle plan against present-day sex-trafficking, we need “courage to raid a brothel in Bangkok and rescue the women, compassion to nurture them to physical health,” and a commissioned heart to “coordinate an awareness campaign and mobilize the public.” It is the work of the kingdom that is at stake, and it is God’s glory that will be advanced when His church refuses to separate what God has joined together. Collin Hansen, in the business of raising a son, has set forth a hope that I share for my own four sons, and for my grandson: ” . . . that [they] might learn to love and trust the Lord Jesus Christ in a courageous, compassionate, and commissioned church.” Amen. Let it be so. For help in identifying your own blind spots, take the Blind Spots Quiz offered by Crossway! This book was provided by Crossway in exchange for my honest review.