Blindman's Bluff (Peter Decker and Rina Lazarus Series #18)

Blindman's Bluff (Peter Decker and Rina Lazarus Series #18)

by Faye Kellerman
3.4 49

Paperback(Mass Market Paperback)

$9.99
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Use Standard Shipping ,  For guaranteed delivery by Dec. 24.
    Same Day delivery in Manhattan. 
    Details

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Blindman's Bluff 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 49 reviews.
pjbhawaii More than 1 year ago
Unfortunately, this is poorly written. Too wordy. In addition, although I'm only 1/3 through, there are already several factual errors. First, a major character is described as a "translator." However, this character is actually an interpreter. A translator is the person who uses the written word to translate documents/letters. An interpreter uses the oral word to interpret the spoken language. In Kellerman's book, the character is a court interpreter who is consistently referred to as a translator. Very annoying if you know the difference. The second vexing error is that the murder victim, a billionaire commercial developer, is described as owning a private company. Kellerman describes a fight between the victim and his brother as "lowering the stock prices." However, a private company is private; there are no stock prices. Only a public company is listed in the stock exchange. Third error, so far, is that she refers to flora as fauna. Flora are plants; fauna are animals. She mixes them up. She needs a better editor. This type of mistake is unnecessary and distracting. I'll likely finish the book cause I paid for the darn thing, but I don't recommend buying it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm afraid the Decker-Lazarus series has run out of steam. The earlier books in this series provided many interesting details regarding Peter & Rina's Orthodox Jewish religious beliefs and practices---I have lived my entire life in the Midwest & know almost no one who is Jewish, so I found this quite fascinating. However, this book makes almost no mention of their religion or home life, & the remaining story was a rather run-of-the-mill police procedural. (Also, the wrong form of the word "breach" was used repeatedly when discussing a "breech (sic) of security." Surely an editor should have caught this!)
Larryb52 More than 1 year ago
Nice mystery lots of good characters BUT it drones on & on. I have to wonder why todays mystery writers feel that they have to give us more than we need & in this case 380 plus pages. This is a good story but if 100 pages were cut out it would of been a better book. Sometimes less is more or better put get to the point...
SteveWold More than 1 year ago
Having read all the Peter Decker books, and I think, all of Faye Kellerman's, I was looking forward to reading her latest. I thought it was an easy read, and as always, I enjoyed my time reading. This book however lacked some of the earlier Peter Decker qualities. Faye seemed to "write down" in this novel, and for me wasn't as griping or entertaining. I also thought I caught a mistake as she says something like police work was what Peter wanted to do after college, but he was a laywer working with his old father-in-law. I have given and recommended "The ritual bath" to many friends. It really combined the police intrigue with the Jewish community. Blindman was too Jewish specific (as in apealing only to religious Jews), and I felt wasn't one of her best.
KenCady More than 1 year ago
This novel starts right out with multiple murders at a mega-mansion. We need to learn the names of the deceased, the staff, the eight detectives on the case, then the staff at the deceased's big company, along with wives and various bit-players, including a blind translator who can intuit just about anything a person might be hiding. We sit in on a detailed meeting of the detectives, with assignments going out, cops saying they can't do this or that, schedules need to be altered. And this is a crime thriller? A suspense novel? We get detoured to a criminal case that the detective's wife is sitting on-as if that would really happen. The author refers to a witness as a plaintiff, apparently unaware that the plaintiff in a California criminal case is the people of the state of California. The detectives get the call on the murder at 3 am. They go to the mansion, with travel time, perhaps arriving at 4. There are no press present. Yet the story is the headlines on that morning's LA Times. Miraculous, huh? It goes on like that until the weary reader just throws up his (my) hands and wonders why I might care about all of this. The author hasn't given me any reason to care about any of it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have been enjoying Kellerman books, but this book was no good. Because the beginning set the stage as a story with potential, I kept reading til the last 100 pages. Then, I thought, why have I spent time with this junk! The book was too wordy, it was drawn out, and the story got stupid. I felt the writer worked off an outline and it made her lack creativity and lose track of the total package. Also, there were way too many descriptions and details given about clothing, and while all the information about the Jewish faith was very interesting, I have no idea why it was in the book. I will try another Kellerman novel, but if it gets bad, I will quit reading more quickly.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago