Blood and Iron (Promethean Age Series #1)

Blood and Iron (Promethean Age Series #1)

by Elizabeth Bear
4.7 9

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Blood and Iron (Promethean Age Series #1) 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
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PhoenixFalls More than 1 year ago
I do not generally read either Arthurian fantasy or books about the Fae; I read this purely because I have greatly enjoyed Elizabeth Bear in the past and I was able to get a copy cheap. Unfortunately, the book suffered (for me) from too many references that I did not understand. I do not know the ballads everyone talks about and gains their knowledge from, and they weren't provided in an index (which is something I would have recommended to the publisher had they asked my opinion). So throughout the book the characters seemed to be reminding each other of things in shorthand that just went completely over my head. But then there were moments that the characters stopped to explain things to each other in ways that I could understand. . . but because of all the previous references that felt like the author forcing the data dump rather than providing information in a natural fashion. I could not see why some characters knew one thing but not another and vice versa. Three quarters of the way through the novel I was convinced that I would be forced to only rate it two stars, despite my usual enjoyment of Bear's writing. But the ending made up for all lack beforehand. Bear pulled off a brilliant shift in perspective, the climax was heart-wrenching and the denouement, which seemed long when I measured the number of pages left after the final battle, brought the entire emotional story to its proper climax and resolution. In fact, looking back on the experience of the novel, despite all of the issues with the provision of information, the only real flaw it feels like it had was that Matthew seemed a somewhat wasted viewpoint character. Given that he is the feature of another novel in this series, I understand why he is there, but every time it switched to him (which was thankfully rare) I gritted my teeth a bit because his story just wasn't that interesting.
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harstan More than 1 year ago
A changeling, Seeker, once known as Elaine Andraste, travels to the soulless Mebd queen of the Daoine Sidhe in a quest to meet her peers and persuade them to return with her to the Faerie court. At the Daoine Sidhe court, Seeker and her companions entertain the Mebd queen, who has been known to abduct human children for her majesty. The Mebd queen assigns Seeker to find the latest reincarnation of Merlin and bring him to her so that she can win his heart and his loyalty if she wants her son Ian freed from his sudden captivity. --- Seeker understands that if the dangerous Prometheus Club members gain control over Merlin, the fairy realm could be destroyed. She and her compatriots must travel to New York City to locate non-believer, college professor Carel Bierce. However, the first ever female Merlin does not believe in the Fae nor the Prometheans as physics is her magic. That is until she begins seeing and doing the impossible. --- This is a complex fantasy filled with action, deep characterizations, and incredible twists to include Professor Bierce being female. The story line is fast-paced as backstabbing and Machiavellian maneuvers in the Faerie court and the Prometheus Club are the norm. Seeker is a great protagonist whose quest seems impossible to achieve with the most difficult obstacle being the obstinate professor. Modern era fantasy readers will enjoy this strong Promethean Age tale. --- Harriet Klausner