Blood of the Earth: Resource Nationalism, Revolution, and Empire in Bolivia

Blood of the Earth: Resource Nationalism, Revolution, and Empire in Bolivia

by Kevin A. Young

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781477311653
Publisher: University of Texas Press
Publication date: 02/14/2017
Pages: 288
Sales rank: 902,551
Product dimensions: 5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.90(d)

About the Author

Kevin A. Young is an assistant professor of history at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Table of Contents

  • Acknowledgments
  • List of Abbreviations
  • Introduction: Natural Resources, Economic Visions, and US Intervention in Twentieth-Century Bolivia
  • 1. The Road to Resource Nationalism: Economic Ideas and Popular Coalitions in La Paz, 1927–1952
  • 2. A New Type of Bolivian Economy: Competing Visions, 1952–1956
  • 3. The Political Economy of Containment: Privatization, Austerity, and the MNR’s Shift to the Right, 1955–1964
  • 4. The Battle for Men’s Minds: Economic Paradigms, Propaganda, and the Iconography of Revolution
  • 5. The Limits of Containment: Anti-Austerity and Resource Nationalism in La Paz Factories
  • 6. Oil and Nation: The Crusade to Save Bolivia’s Hydrocarbons
  • Epilogue: Resource Nationalism and Popular Struggle in the Twenty-First Century
  • Appendix: Professional Backgrounds of Key Middle-Class Participants in Economic Debates, 1940s–1960s
  • Notes
  • Bibliography
  • Index

What People are Saying About This

Erick D. Langer

"'Resource nationalism’ is a very suggestive concept that can be applied to other countries in Latin America (and probably other parts of the world, such as Africa) very productively to understand domestic politics in relation to the great powers, such as the United States."

James Siekmeier

"A very important contribution for experts and non-experts alike. Young’s argument is a new, fresh way of looking at both Bolivian revolutionary thought and recent Bolivian history. No one else that I know of has focused on ‘resource nationalism,’ which Young argues persuasively is key to understanding Bolivia in the twentieth century and beyond."

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