ISBN-10:
1602860564
ISBN-13:
9781602860568
Pub. Date:
09/02/2008
Publisher:
Weinstein Books
ISBN-10:
1602860564
ISBN-13:
9781602860568
Pub. Date:
09/02/2008
Publisher:
Weinstein Books
Bloodletting and Miraculous Cures

Bloodletting and Miraculous Cures

by Vincent Lam Vincent Lam
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Overview

Bloodletting & Miraculous Cures welcomes readers into a world where the most mundane events can quickly become life or death. By following four young medical students and physicians – Ming, Fitz, Sri and Chen – this debut collection from 2006 Scotiabank Giller Prize winner Vincent Lam is a riveting, eye-opening account of what it means to be a doctor. Deftly navigating his way through 12 interwoven short stories, the author explores the characters’ relationships with each other, their patients, and their careers. Lam draws on his own experience as an emergency room physician and shares an insider’s perspective on the fears, frustrations, and responsibilities linked with one of society’s most highly regarded occupations.

“I wanted to write about the way in which a person changes as they become a physician — how their world view shifts, and how they become a slightly different version of themselves in the process of becoming a doctor,” Lam explains. “I wanted to write about the reality that doing good and trying to help others is not simple. It is ethically complicated and sometimes involves a reality that can only be expressed by telling a story.”

In the book’s first story, “How to Get into Medical School, Part 1,” students Ming and Fitz wrestle with their opposing personalities and study techniques, while coming to terms with a growing emotional connection that elicits disapproval from Ming’s traditional Chinese-Canadian parents. Lam’s exceptional talent for describing scenarios with great precision is showcased in “Take All of Murphy,” when Ming, Chen, and Sri find themselves at a moral crossroads while dissecting a cadaver. Throughout the book, readers are treated to the physicians’ internal thoughts and the mental drama involved with treating patients, including Fitz’s struggle with self-doubt in “Code Clock” and Chen’s boredom and exhaustion in “Before Light.”

From delivering babies to evacuating patients and dealing with deadly viruses, the four primary characters in Bloodletting & Miraculous Cures are made thoroughly human by Lam’s insightful detail, realistic dialogue, and expert storytelling. The medical world is naturally filled with drama, but it’s the author’s ability to give equal weight to the smaller moments that really brings this book to life.



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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781602860568
Publisher: Weinstein Books
Publication date: 09/02/2008
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 374
Product dimensions: 5.30(w) x 7.80(h) x 1.10(d)

About the Author

Vincent Lam was born in 1974 in London, Ont., into a family from the expatriate Chinese community of Vietnam. Four years later, they moved to Ottawa where he was raised on stories told by his father and the works of C.S. Lewis and Roald Dahl, and developed aspirations to become a writer. Acknowledging that he hadn’t seen enough of the world to create great literary works, Lam enrolled in medical school at the University of Toronto, hoping it would provide real-life experience and a wealth of rich material. His plan proved to be a very good one.

It was while working as a doctor aboard an Arctic cruise that Lam had a chance encounter with renowned author Margaret Atwood. She agreed to read his short stories, and later sent him an email announcing “Congratulations. You can write.” Atwood mentored the young author, and was instrumental in bringing Lam to his publisher, Doubleday Canada.

While crafting his debut collection of short stories, Lam worked in the emergency room at Toronto East General Hospital and helped fight the 2003 SARS outbreak. “An emergency physician is often in the centre of a storm of tensions and drama,” he says. “We work in a world that is both medical and personal, where the stakes are high and events are unpredictable. As a doctor, I respond to the world around me, and act within that world. As a writer, I do something fresh and new on the page.”

Lam’s depiction of four medical students who become doctors in Bloodletting & Miraculous Cures was so unique and accomplished that the collection won the 2006 Scotiabank Giller Prize – Canada’s most prestigious literary award. He is the youngest writer, and the only first-time author, to win it.

Next up is Lam’s first novel, Cholon, Near Forgotten, which follows a Chinese man in Saigon, headmaster of an English school as well as a compulsive gambler, during the Vietnam War. Shaftesbury Films is currently developing Bloodletting & Miraculous Cures into a TV drama series for The Movie Network and Lam will act as a consultant while continuing to work as an emergency physician in Toronto, where he lives with his wife and son.

Read an Excerpt

Bloodletting and Miraculous Cures


By Vincent Lam

Random House

Vincent Lam
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0385661436


Chapter One

How to Get into Medical School, Part I

Desperate stragglers arrived late for the molecular biology final examination, their feet wet from tramping through snowbanks and their faces damp from running. Some still wore coats, and rummaged in the pockets for pens. Entering the exam hall, a borrowed gymnasium, from the whipping chaos of the snowstorm was to be faced with a void. Eyeglasses fogged, xenon lamps burned their blue-tinged light, and the air was calm with its perpetual fragrance of old paint. The lamps buzzed, and their constant static was like a sheet pulled out from under the snowstorm, though low enough that the noise vanished quickly. Invigilators led latecomers to vacant seats among the hundreds of desks, each evenly spaced at the University of Ottawa's minimum requisite distance.

The invigilators allowed them to sit the exam but, toward the end of the allotted period, ignored their pleas for extra time on account of the storm. Ming, who had finished early, centred her closed exam booklet in front of her. Fitzgerald was still hunched over his paper. She didn't want to wait outside for him, preferring it to be very coincidental that she would leave the room at the same time he did. Hopefully he would suggest they go for lunch together. If he did not ask, she would be forced to, perhaps using a little joke. Ming tended to stumble over humour. She could ask what he planned to do this afternoon -- was that the kind of thing people said? On scrap paper, she wrote several possible ways to phrase the question, and in doing so almost failed to notice when Fitzgerald stood up, handed in his exam, and left the room. She expected to rush after him, but he stood outside the exam hall.

"Are you waiting for someone?" she asked.

Shortly after they arrived at the Thai-Laotian cafe half a block from campus, Ming said deliberately, "Fitz, I simply wanted to wish you the best in your future endeavours. You are obviously intelligent, and I'm sure you will be a great success."

The restaurant was overly warm, and Fitz struggled out of his coat, wrestled his sweater over his head, leaving his hair in a wild, electrified state. He ran his hands over his head, and instead of smoothing his hair this resulted in random clumps jutting straight up.

"Same to you," he said, smiling at her almost excitedly.

She watched him scan the bar menu. When she asked for water, he followed suit. She liked that.
She said, "Also, thank you for explaining the Krebs cycle to me."

"Any time," said Fitz.

"I feel guilty that I haven't been completely open," said Ming. She considered her prepared phrases and selected one, saying, "It didn't seem like the right time in the middle of exams."

"Nothing in real life makes sense during exams," said Fitzgerald. He tilted in the chair but kept a straight back. Ming reassured herself that he had also been anticipating "a talk," and so--she concluded with an administrative type of resolution--it was appropriate that she had raised the topic of "them."

She leaned forward and almost whispered, "This is awkward, but I have strong emotional suspicions. Such suspicions are not quite the same as emotions. I'm sure you can understand that distinction. I have this inkling that you have an interest in me." She didn't blurt it out, instead forced herself to pace these phrases. "The thing of it is that I can't have a romantic relationship with you. Not that I want to." Now she was off the path of her rehearsed lines. "Not that I wouldn't want to, because there's no specific reason that I wouldn't, but I-- Well, what I'm trying to say is that even though I don't especially want to, if I did, then I couldn't." The waiter brought shrimp chips and peanut sauce. "So that's that."

"All right," said Fitzgerald.

"I should have told you earlier, when I first got that feeling."

"You've given the issue some thought."

"Not much. I just wanted to clarify."

Fitz picked up a shrimp chip by its edge, dipped it in the peanut sauce with red pepper flakes, and crunched. His face became sweaty and bloomed red as he chewed, then coughed. He grasped the water glass and took a quick gulp.

Ming said, "Are you upset?"

He coughed to his right side, and had difficulty stopping. He reminded himself to sit up straight while coughing, realized that he wasn't covering his mouth, covered his mouth, was embarrassed that his fair skin burned hot and red, wondered in a panicky blur if this redness would be seen to portray most keenly his injured emotional state, his physical vulnerability in choking, his Anglocentric intolerance to chili, his embarrassment at not initially covering his mouth, his obvious infatuation with Ming, or--worst of all--could be interpreted as a feeble attempt to mask or distract from his discomfort at her pre-emptive romantic rejection.

Ming was grateful for this interlude, for she had now entirely forgotten her rehearsed stock of diplomatically distant but consoling though slightly superior phrases.

"Hot sauce. I'm fine," he gasped, coughing.

There was a long restaurant pause, in which Ming was aware of the other diners talking, although she could not perceive what their conversations were about.

She said, "I've embarrassed us both."

"I'm glad you mentioned it."

"So you are interested," she said. "Or you were interested until a moment ago. Is that why you're glad that I mentioned it?"

"It doesn't matter, does it? What you've just said has made it irrelevant. Or, it would be irrelevant if it were previously relevant, but I'm glad you brought up your feelings," said Fitzgerald. He picked up the menu.

"Don't feel obliged to tell me whether I needed to say what I just said."

"It was great to study together. You've got a great handle on . . . on mitochondria."

The waiter came. Ming felt unable to read the menu, and pointed at a lunch item in the middle of the page. She got up to use the bathroom, and wondered in the mirror why she had not worn lipstick -- not taken a minute this morning to look good. Then, she reminded herself that she should have actually taken measures to appear unattractive. Nonetheless, Ming examined her purse for lipstick, finding only extra pens and a crumpled exam schedule. When she returned, they smiled politely at each other for a little while. They ate, and the noodles fell persistently from Fitzgerald's chopsticks onto the plate, resisting consumption. Ming asked if he wanted a fork, and he refused. After a while, as Fitzgerald's pad thai continued to slither from his grasp, Ming caught the waiter's eye, who noticed Fitzgerald's barely eaten plate and brought a fork without Ming having to ask.

Fitzgerald ate with the fork, and craved a beer.

"We're great study partners," said Ming, still holding her chopsticks. "I want to clarify that it's not because of you." She had to get into medical school this year, and therefore couldn't allow distraction. Her family, she said, was modern in what they wanted for her education, and old-fashioned in what they imagined for her husband. They would disapprove of Fitzgerald, a non-Chinese. They would be upset with Ming, and she couldn't take these risks while she prepared to apply for medical school. The delicate nature of this goal, upon which one must be crucially focused, superseded everything else, Ming reminded Fitzgerald. He stopped eating while she talked. She looked down, stabbed her chopsticks into the noodles, and twisted them around.

He asked, "What about you?"

"What do you mean, me?" she said.

"Telling me this. Did you feel . . . interested?"

"I thought you might be."

"You might say that I've noticed you, but I accept the situation. Priorities." The imperative of medical school applications carried the unassailable weight of a religious edict.

"Very well," she said, as if they had clarified a business arrangement.

The bill came. Fitzgerald tried to pay and Ming protested. He said that she could get the bill next time and she insisted that they should share.


Excerpted from Bloodletting and Miraculous Cures by Vincent Lam Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Reading Group Guide

1. Consider the personalities of Ming, Chen, Sri, and Fitz. Which character did you most identify with and why?

2. In “How to Get into Medical School, Part 1,” Ming and Fitz talk about the “right reasons” to become physicians: service, humanity, and giving. What other motivations do you think they each had that weren’t vocalized at the time?

3. In “Take All of Murphy,” what is the significance of how differently Ming and Chen treated the cadaver?

4. What did you find to be the most compelling moral dilemma explored in this book?

5. When Sri is trying to diagnose his patient Winston (p.125) Dr. Miniadis tells him: “You’ve heard that the sound of hoofbeats implies the presence of horses? It is true that we must look carefully for zebras, but for the most part we expect to find horses.” Discuss whether you think this advice helped Sri deal with his patient.

6. Discuss the various scenarios in which the characters were forced to deal with death.

7. What part of the story “Contact Tracing” surprised you the most, and why?

8. Why do you think the author chose to tell some stories involving Chen (“A Long Migration,” “Before Light”) and Fitz (“Eli,” “Night Flight”) in the first person?

9. What is your final opinion of Fitz?

10. Which story did you enjoy the most and why?

11. How have these stories made you look at doctors and other health care professionals differently?

12. The book will be made into a TV series–which actors would you cast to play the four main characters?

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