Bluegrass Melodies

Bluegrass Melodies

by Bobby Osborne

CD

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Product Details

Release Date: 07/10/2007
Label: Rounder / Umgd
UPC: 0011661058224
catalogNumber: 610582
Rank: 277135

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Bobby Osborne   Primary Artist,Mandolin,Vocals,Tenor (Vocal)
Rhonda Vincent   Vocals,Tenor (Vocal)
Glen Duncan   Acoustic Guitar,Fiddle,Baritone (Vocal),Tenor (Vocal)
Daryl Mosley   Tenor (Vocal),Acoustic Bass
Matt DeSpain   Dobro,Baritone (Vocal)
Bobby Osborne   Acoustic Guitar,Baritone (Vocal),Acoustic Bass

Technical Credits

Marty Stuart   Liner Notes
Buck Owens   Composer
Glen Duncan   Composer,Producer,Liner Notes
Felice Bryant   Composer
Vince Gill   Composer
Bobby Osborne   Composer
John Sommers   Composer
Darrell Statler   Composer
Jerry Salley   Composer
Ben Surratt   Engineer

Customer Reviews

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Bluegrass Melodies 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Playing Time – 39:18 -- About a year after his “Try a Little Kindness” debut on the Rounder Records, Bobby Osborne’s second release on that label further indicates that the 75-year-old pioneer’s bluegrass is higher and lonesomer than ever. At age 18, Bobby first learned about being forlorn and alone when he started his career in 1949 with banjo player Larry Richardson, Charlie and Ray Cline in The Lonesome Pine Fiddlers. Today, his soaring vocals still exude pathos in songs like an original “Color Me Lonely,” Glen Duncan and Jerry Salley’s “Under A Lonesome Moon,” and Carter Stanley’s “Lonesome River” that is given a slight interpretive twist to impart his own personalized stamp. When Bobby tenderly sings of suffering, we’re immediately sympathetic. The “Music Makin’ Man” also still incorporates plenty of country charm into his “Bluegrass Melodies.” While some of his mandolin breaks may not come off as cleanly nimble-fingered as in younger days, a special treat is his own instrumental “Lucky Lane Shuffle,” a rag that recalls the influence of early southern music on the genre. Joining Osborne, his band The Rocky Top X-Press includes Dana Cupp (banjo), Daryl Mosley (bass), Bobby Osborne Jr. (rhythm guitar), and Matt Despain (Dobro). Rhonda Vincent’s defining vocals appear in the poignant closer written by Vince Gill, “Go Rest High On That Mountain.” Glen Duncan’s superb fiddling (often twinned) appears on all twelve tracks, and he supercharges the interesting, varied and poised material in the well-balanced set. Bobby Osborne’s stability and perseverance are the epitome of bluegrass strength and equilibrium. While there are many varieties of bluegrass music, Bobby Osborne’s cultivates all the elements of polished radio-friendly fare that is still full of sorrow, risk, joy and reverence. (Joe Ross, staff writer, Bluegrass Now)
Guest More than 1 year ago
Playing Time – 39:18 About a year after his “Try a Little Kindness” debut on the Rounder Records, Bobby Osborne’s second release on that label further indicates that the 75-year-old pioneer’s bluegrass is higher and lonesomer than ever. At age 18, Bobby first learned about being forlorn and alone when he started his career in 1949 with banjo player Larry Richardson, Charlie and Ray Cline in The Lonesome Pine Fiddlers. Today, his soaring vocals still exude pathos in songs like an original “Color Me Lonely,” Glen Duncan and Jerry Salley’s “Under A Lonesome Moon,” and Carter Stanley’s “Lonesome River” that is given a slight interpretive twist to impart his own personalized stamp. When Bobby tenderly sings of suffering, we’re immediately sympathetic. The “Music Makin’ Man” also still incorporates plenty of country charm into his “Bluegrass Melodies.” While some of his mandolin breaks may not come off as cleanly and nimble-fingered as in younger days, a special treat is his own instrumental “Lucky Lane Shuffle,” a rag that recalls the influence of early southern music on the genre. Joining Osborne, his band The Rocky Top X-Press includes Dana Cupp (banjo), Daryl Mosley (bass), Bobby Osborne Jr. (rhythm guitar), and Matt Despain (Dobro). Rhonda Vincent’s defining vocals appear in the poignant closer written by Vince Gill, “Go Rest High On That Mountain.” Glen Duncan’s superb fiddling (often twinned) appears on all twelve tracks, and he supercharges the interesting, varied and poised material in the well-balanced set. Bobby Osborne’s stability and perseverance are the epitome of bluegrass strength and equilibrium. While there are many varieties of bluegrass music, Bobby Osborne’s cultivates all the elements of polished radio-friendly fare that is still full of sorrow, risk, joy and reverence. (Joe Ross, staff writer, Bluegrass Now)