Body of Lies

Body of Lies

by David Ignatius

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Overview

The novel made into the major motion picture released October 2008, starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Russell Crowe: "Clever [and] well-paced, Body of Lies is hard to put down."—John Miller, Wall Street Journal


CIA soldier Roger Ferris has come out of Iraq with a shattered leg and an intense mission—to penetrate the network of a master terrorist known only as "Suleiman." Ferris's plan is inspired by a masterpiece of British intelligence during World War II: He prepares a body of lies, literally the corpse of an imaginary CIA officer who appears to have accomplished the impossible by recruiting an agent within the enemy's ranks. This scheme binds friend and foe in a web of extraordinary subtlety and complexity. When it begins to unravel, Ferris finds himself flying blind into a hurricane. His only hope is the urbane head of Jordan's intelligence service. But can Ferris trust him?

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780594888543
Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date: 04/07/2008
Pages: 352
Sales rank: 523,709
Product dimensions: 6.76(w) x 9.02(h) x 0.82(d)

About the Author

David Ignatius is a prize-winning columnist for the Washington Post and has been covering the Middle East and the CIA for nearly three decades. He has written several New York Times bestsellers, most recently The Director. He lives in Washington, D.C.

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

"Ignatius has crafted one of the best post-9/11 spy thrillers yet." —-Publishers Weekly Starred Review

Customer Reviews

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Body of Lies 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 59 reviews.
Aelius More than 1 year ago
BODY OF LIES is startlingly contemporary--a story of the front lines of the intelligence war against Al Qaeda by a journalist who has covered both the CIA and Iraq for a quarter of a century. It is at once sobering, touching and invigorating. Fans of Ignatius's earlier works should know that this book is his best; those who have not yet discovered this prolific spy novelist (whose day job is as columnist for THE WASHINGTON POST) should do so. Inside a detailed and authoritative story of how both Western and Arab secret services fight what has been called "the long war" against violent Islamic terror, Ignatius has created a story of identity in the hall of mirrors that is the contemporary Middle East, and a love story that is powerful in its evocation of the ways that love can make us treasure life, and at the same time lay it down for those we love. Cancel your weekend plans; you won't be able to put BODY OF LIES down.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Agents a bit to super but a good story of the lies to everyone
jclark88 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
An engaging behind-the-scenes story of the war on terror. The book tells the story of a CIA agent who gets caught up in an operation where everything might not be what it seems. Most of the action takes place in Jordan rather than the usual places one might expect. There's also a love story thrown in that only sort of works but is used mostly to drive the story to a conclusion. The last third of the book is interesting and fairly clever. From what I hear the movie is vastly different from the story told in the novel which isn't very surprising. It's a good read and it didn't take me long. Not sure I'd put it at the top of any list, but worth the time if you like this type of story.
Clif on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I was first attracted to this book because it involved the relationship between Jordanian Intelligence and the CIA. Since there had been a recent story in the news about several CIA agents who were killed by an operative who came from Jordanian Intelligence, I thought perhaps this novel may have predicted the actual news event. Well, this book didn¿t do that, but I¿ll have to admit that I was impressed with the book¿s ending.Through the first half of the book I seriously considered bailing out and not finishing. The description of personal relationships seems sophomoric, written at a level to appeal to adolescent males. The description of CIA activities could only appeal to people who think the real life CIA program of ¿extraordinary rendition¿ was a good idea. Then the action started becoming more interesting, so I decided to finish the book. But I still planned to rate the book at one star. Then I came to the end. I was blown away. So I have to give it more than one star. What do you do with a book that you both love and hate? Well, how about two stars?Here's the review of the book that was on my PageADay Calendar:EVERYTHING YOU WANT IN A SPY NOVELThis intricately plotted post-9/11 spy thriller is so gripping because its author, journalist David Ignatius, has a masterful command of the ins and outs of Middle Eastern politics, and because his characters are such fully drawn individuals. The suspense is riveting and the conclusion unexpected, to put it mildly.BODY OF LIES, by David Ignatius (W. W. Norton, 2007)The WW2 era Operation Mincemeat is referenced in this book. It's interesting to note that a recent book by the same title has been published, Operation Mincemeat by Ben MacIntyre. If you don't know what Operation Mincemeat involved, I'll let you do your own research.
WillyMammoth on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Body of Lies is a great modern day spy thriller. I finished the book in just a few days and thoroughly enjoyed it. Ignatius isn't as good as Le Carre, but he's a very competent story teller and someone whom I would read more from. The twist at the end of the book was a good one, and even though it took a smidge of suspension of disbelief to get there (some of the details seeming just a tiny bit implausible), it in no way detracted from my enjoyment of the tale. The characters in this book, I felt, were deeper than some reviewers have given them credit for. To be sure there were some stock characters used, but character motivation and personality were always well defined. And besides, there isn't a thriller out there that doesn't make use of stock characters in some respect. If you're a fan of the genre, I don't see how Body of Lies would disappoint you.Now, it's possible that some of the politics supposedly espoused in this book might turn a reader off; however, I actually thought Ignatius did a pretty good job of sticking to the middle road. The main character's girlfriend was a bleeding heart liberal, so she said bleeding heart liberal things. When I read the book, I was unsure if Ignatius espoused the same beliefs as Alice, since there are differing viewpoints expressed by various characters. But given his track record as a journalist, I'm disinclined to think so. And at any rate, you don't have to agree with or like every character in order to enjoy the story.
ashergabbay on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
¿Body of Lies¿ is the second book by David Ignatius that I¿ve read (last month I read ¿Agents of Innocence¿). Ignatius is an American journalist/novelist whom I never heard of until the infamous 2009 ¿Davos Incident¿. Ignatius discovered ¿ I¿m sure to his amazement ¿ how mad you can make a Turkish politician when you dare interrupt his ranting by putting a hand on his shoulder. No doubt Ignatius has been keeping his hands to himself since.Anyway, some time ago The Economist recommended the new Ignatius novel ¿Bloodmoney¿, and since I have this medical condition which impels me to make an effort to read books by the same author more or less in the chronological order they were published, I started with ¿Agents¿ and only then moved on to ¿Body of Lies¿.I didn¿t like ¿Agents of Innocence¿ even though it was set in Lebanon and dealt with events surrounding the Palestinian encroaching takeover of that country in the 1970s, a topic I once used to be very interested in. I found the book to be lacking in depth and the characters to be too underdeveloped to be meaningful. I also found a factual mistake, which is always a real put off in books (Ignatius refers to the Israel currency, the Shekel, at a time when the currency was still the Lira). I had greater hopes for ¿Body of Lies¿ especially as I was vaguely aware there was a Leonardo DiCaprio character somewhere in there¿And I was not too disappointed. ¿Body of Lies¿ is a much more mature book than ¿Agents¿ and, if anything, moves at a much faster pace. Roger Ferris, a CIA agent stationed in Amman, Jordan, devises a scheme to set a trap for Al-Saleem, a terrorist responsible for multiple car bombings in Europe. He creates a fictional terrorist to ¿compete¿ with Al-Saleem (by setting off his own bomb), thus hoping to lure the terrorist out of hiding. His fatal mistake is not involving Hani Salaam, the elegantly dressed head of Jordanian Intelligence, in all the details. The two weave a ¿body of lies¿ around each other which eventually ends up in a shootout in Syria where Ferris almost dies but is saved at the last minute by Salaam. As is almost obligatory in these novels, Ferris is unhappily married and meets a beautiful woman, a nurse by the name of Aisha, with whom he falls hopelessly in love with, etc.Right after finishing the book I watched the movie. That¿s when I understood why I thought of DiCaprio; he plays the Ferris character. I liked the movie and thought it was perhaps even more enjoyable than the book, which I¿m afraid doesn¿t say much for David Ignatius¿ writing. After all, a movie starring DiCaprio being better than something surely isn¿t a good sign for that something¿
kd9 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I have to admit this is fascinating book. Although not as complex as LeCarré, there are several twists and turns that are inevitable, yet stunning.The main character is Roger Ferris, a CIA agent in the Middle East who would rather stay in the field than return to Washington or his ambitious wife who works in the State Department. His boss, Ed Hoffmann, is desperate to find the head of an Al Qeada cell who is setting off car bombs in large cities in western Europe. Together Roger and Ed put together a scheme to dump a body in Pakistan with information that seems to indicate a mole in the Al Qeada organization hoping to bring more of the organization into the open. While running this deception from Amman, Jordan, Roger falls in love with an NGO aide worker, Alice Melville. As their schemes turn inside out, Roger does not know who is pulling the strings, his boss or the head of the Jordanian Intelligence.For those of you who enjoy Daniel Silva and other writers fictionalizing the covert operations in the Middle East, I highly recommend this book.
Doondeck on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A very clever thriller involving both the cleverness and ineptitude of the CIA. The peek into the Jordanian intelligence operation was very interesting.
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