The Book of Old Houses (Home Repair Is Homicide Series #11)

The Book of Old Houses (Home Repair Is Homicide Series #11)

by Sarah Graves
4.0 10

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Book of Old Houses (Home Repair Is Homicide Series #11) 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
Avid-ReaderAG More than 1 year ago
If you want an improbable plot, mediocre writing and a violent ending this may be for you. But this is the first Graves book I have not enjoyed, nor liked. The never-ending repairs rather than restoration and interminable Jacobia humorous (supposedly) situations are boring.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I've read all the books in this series and find them to be highly enjoyable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She splashed in the lake before moving on.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If you enjoy fast reading & a good plot, I recommed this book. I've read the whole series & even gotten a few other people interested in the series. I even enjoy the little 'household' tips that are included too.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
harstan More than 1 year ago
Jacobia ¿Jake¿ Tiptree seems to always be fixing up something in her 1823 Eastport, Maine home yet finds the time to solve a murder or two. However, this time she gets spooked when she finds a book in the foundation of her basement. It seems written in blood and contains names of people who have lived in the house through the almost two centuries including the current spooked occupant. She sends the book to rare book expert Horace Robotham for authentication. --- Horace is murdered and the book vanished. His friend David DiMaio arrives at Jake¿s house introducing himself as the late Horace¿s friend. He also insists he drove to Eastport because someone he went to school with Bert Merkle had a motive to kill Horace. Dave asks questions of the household and the townsfolk. Horace¿s lonely friend Jason Riverton is killed and in a separate incident so is wannabe author Ann Talbert. The police claim the latter two deaths were coincidental misfortunate accidents Jake refuses to believe the probability of so much coincidence as winning the lottery has better odds. She risks her life to prove a killer is working the book beat. --- Jake is a strong independent woman, who does most of the repairs and renovations to her fixer-upper she also worries about her son Sam who just got out of jail while planning a poster for the town patriarch. Dave is the catalyst who sets much of the events in motion, but Jake is the tough broad trying to fix the problem. Sarah Graves latest ¿home repair¿ cozy is a grand regional amateur sleuth. --- Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this while on vacation, after finding it in my cruise ship's library. I read it through to the end, hoping that somehow the ending would make up for the poor writing and weird storytelling. It did not. The main character ("Jake", our heroine who is supposedly an expert crime solver) is described by the author as an intelligent, strong and feisty woman - yet she rarely ever does anything that lives up to any of these descriptions. I guess she thinks her heroine is strong and feisty because the character is often contemplating doing something bold, but never actually follows through on it. For the entire story, "Jake" concocts a bunch of stupid reasons why someone would want to commit the murder(s); she is never correct and only makes the story even more convoluted (if that is possible). This supposed strong heroine is neither bright nor strong, and ultimately doesn't even come close to solving a crime - and needs to be rescued by the men in her life, who are far smarter and stronger than she is. As for plot, this thing is so warped and confusing that I'm surprised the author even bothered to finish the book. The crimes and the motives make so little sense that I stopped caring what happened, let alone who did it. The writing style is also annoying - the foolish stories of her home repair (yet one more thing that "Jake" is totally inept at) only serve as padding to a flimsy and uninteresting crime story. The subplots of her father's romance with her housekeeper and her son's supposed recovery from alcoholism are equally dull. Reading this book only shows why readers are better off sticking with classic writers of mystery like Agatha Christie, or more contemporary writers like Scott Patterson. This series of "Home Repair is Homicide" is one I won't bother to continue with.