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Game Programming: The L Line, The Express Line to Learning / Edition 1
     

Game Programming: The L Line, The Express Line to Learning / Edition 1

4.0 1
by Andy Harris
 

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ISBN-10: 0470068221

ISBN-13: 9780470068229

Pub. Date: 02/09/2007

Publisher: Wiley

Get on the fast track to creating computer games

Ever want to develop your own computer game? Learn the practical concepts of object-oriented programming for game design using Python(r) in this easy-to-follow, content-filled guide. Whether you're a student, aspiring game developer, or veteran programmer, you'll gain skills as you progress from station to station

Overview

Get on the fast track to creating computer games

Ever want to develop your own computer game? Learn the practical concepts of object-oriented programming for game design using Python(r) in this easy-to-follow, content-filled guide. Whether you're a student, aspiring game developer, or veteran programmer, you'll gain skills as you progress from station to station in a series of clear-cut tutorials on different styles of games. The last stop will be a finished game program for you to show off. Start your journey today on The Express Line to Learning and see where it takes you!

• Learn the basics of programming and 2D graphics as you go

• Plan programs, write and test code, and manage data

• Create text-based games, racing games, arcade games, and more

• Add sound, set up scorekeeping, and design avatars

All aboard for valuable online extras

Visit The L Line Web site at www.wiley.com/go/thelline for valuable online supplementary materials:

• Test bank with challenging review questions

• PowerPoint(r) slides with chapter outlines

• Programming code from the book

Along The L Line

• Complete tutorial coverage

• Ample illustrations and examples

• Real-world applications and hints for avoiding pitfalls

• Practice exams that help evaluate your progress

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780470068229
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
02/09/2007
Series:
L Line: The Express Line To Learning Series , #1
Pages:
570
Product dimensions:
7.50(w) x 9.25(h) x 1.33(d)

Related Subjects

Table of Contents

Preface.

Chapter 1: Writing Your First Program.

Chapter 2: Working with Data.

Chapter 3: Taking Control.

Chapter 4: Building a Game Foundation.

Chapter 5: Drawing and Events.

Chapter 6: Audio and Basic Sprites.

Chapter 7: Building a Working Game.

Chapter 8: Making Animated Sprites.

Chapter 9: Realistic Movement.

Chapter 10: Building a Game Engine.

Appendix A: The Practice Exam Answers.

Appendix B: GameEngine Documentation.

Appendix C: Distributing Modules and Programs.

Appendix D: Creating Graphics and Sound.

Index.

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Game Programming: The L Line, The Express Line to Learning 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
For someone who has never coded a game before, and who perhaps is also new to the entire field of programming, this can be daunting. Commercial games are usually coded in C++. Which is quite an intricate language, especially for the neophyte. Harris furnishes a plausible alternative, where the scripting language Python is used to teach an introductory course in game programming. You do need some earlier exposure to Python. Though if you still feel awkward in it, you can use this book for the extra reason of gaining experience in Python. Harris explains that there is an open source Python gaming site, that offers the eponymous pygame. You download and install this on your machine. It gives a simple, very bare bones Integrated Development Environment for game coding. If you have used more general purpose IDEs, like Microsoft's Visual Studio, then you can certainly learn pygame. It is much smaller. Within pygame, you can code small games. Yes, small. But the pedagogy is important. The games elucidated in the text have properties common to many, much larger games. As in how to write event driven code, for example. Or drawing geometric figures on the screen. And using sprites. The flavour of the games is like those games of the early 80s. Or the current games for cellphones.