Born on the Fourth of July

Born on the Fourth of July

by Ron Kovic
4.2 14

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Born on the Fourth of July 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am a high school sophomore and I had to read this book for a project.   This book changed my views. Knowing a Veteran I never understood why the Veteran I know never liked to talk about the war he was in, and after reading this book, I understand. The way Kovic talks about his experiences throughout his life; before, during, and after the war, is so amazing, it's like you're there experiencing these things with him. I liked the way everything in the book was paced, like how he talks  about his life right after the war rather than during or before the war. You can tell how passionate he is about the war just by reading  through a chapter or two. While reading it I was in awe about how well written Born on the Fourth of July was. It's amazing to see what  stories one man can tell. And I absolutely loved the way he talks about his childhood in this book, it truly is like you're there. Although I loved the way he talked about his childhood and  life after the war, I wish he would've talked more about the war itself. I was also  confused also about some of the events taking place because in the book he would go from story to story in different tenses and in points  of view. Other than that, the book was great. Overall I'd give this book a B+/ A-   
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am a high school sophomore and I had to read this book for an English research project based on the topic I chose, which was the Vietnam War. I never knew how it really felt to be involved in a war until I read this book. Ron explains, with a tremendous amount of detail, about how it is to be involved in a war and what the outcome is. I personally expected more from this book. I felt as if Ron Kovic wrote too much about his previous life and not enough about the actual Vietnam War. His way of writing is very interesting and not, in any way, boring. Despite all of the extra information, I really liked the way he told his story. I felt the pain when he described how he was treated in the hospitals and how the sergeants cussed and pushed him around. All the cussing caused me to be frustrated and not understand why they had to be so harsh. I was not very interested in how much Ron explained his desire to make love to women. I feel as if he went a little too overboard with explaining about the time he hit puberty and his feelings of wanting to go out and do every pretty woman he saw. Overall, Ron Kovic’s book is easy to understand and at times, very captivating. I would recommend this book to a friend, if they would like to know more about how real men felt during and after the war.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am a high school sophomore and I had to read this book for a research project based on the topic I chose, which was the Vietnam War. I personally expected more from the book, Born on the Fourth of July. I felt like Ron Kovic wrote too much about his previous life and not enough about the actual Vietnam War. His way of writing is very interesting and not, in any way, boring. Despite all of the extra information, I really liked the way he told his story. I felt the pain when he described how he was treated in the hospitals and how the sergeants cussed and pushed him around. All the cussing caused me, the reader, to even get frustrated and not understand why they had to be so harsh. Overall, Ron Kovic’s book is easy to understand and at times, very captivating. I would recommend this book to a friend, if they would like to know more about how real men felt during and after the war.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A soldiers story of the hopelessness of war.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
With out a doubt this was the best book I have ever read. I read it three times over starting when I was in High school. Ron kovics story turned me off from enlisting in the service and seeking a life of peace instead. This book changed my life forever and reshaped my views on how I see life, my government and how I live from day to day. Ron Kovic is truly a honest hero who made a horrible sacrafice that has changed the world for the better.
upriver More than 1 year ago
An interesting read. A scary look at a position we put ourselves in, a (should be) lesson in the future. Thought provoking story of the times, the shameful times. Inspired me to wonder, "what makes us think like we do." As a veteran, I support the writing and enjoyed the book immensely. As a person that enjoys reading a good story I also support the writing....and salute the author.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I could not stop reading this book, once I started it. Kovic's memoir is a must read for every American and Marine. I learned so much from such a small book! Thank you Mr. Kovic for your honest opinions about a terrible time in American history.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i was shocked reading this book because it left me anticipating to turn the page. It takes you on a first-hand journey of Kovic's life's aftermath of the Vietnam war as he is left paralyzed. It is absolutely breathtaking and deep to see the change and the feelings he expresses that it almost makes you feel like you're part of it
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read the book, and I thought it was great.The book tells you about Ron Kovik, a young man who was very athletic and decided to join the army to get an early career. He found out that war is hell and he had become paralyzed from waist down. There would be a lot of young athletes and war veterans that would love to read this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
BOTFOJ tells all about the hell of war. This book is the personal tale of it's author Ron Kovic, that shows his dramatic transfer or coming of age if you will... He makes a complete 180 beginning the story as a Hawk and ending up a Dove. He is the typical all american boy, and loves his country, but all that changes in Vietnam. When he is wounded almost fatally, he becomes a parapalegic, and gets neglected in the veteran's hospitals in Vietnam. This is when the metamorphisis occurs. This is a must read for anyone studying the Vietnam war as a valuable first hand account. Some parallels can also be drawn between Kovic and Lieutenant Dan from Forrest Gump.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was the best book that I have ever read and I will never forgit it
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am a high school sophomore and I chose to read this chose to read this book for my research project.Born on the Fourth of July is a very influential book. Ron Kovic is very patriotic person and he sticks up for what he believes in. This book shows the point of view of what it would be like to be a Vietnam Veteran. It made me realize that many veterans were treated badly when they came back from the war. Ron Kovic had us experience what his life was before, during, and after the war. This book makes you feel like you are with him through his lifetime. He describes how he felt about the war and how it was like being paralyzed. You experience his life from when he was a kid to when he stood up for himself and other veterans at President Nixon’s acceptance speech. Kovic always has been a patriotic American; he loved his country and was willing to die for it too. Born on The fourth of July was entertaining, a fast read and very descriptive. It feels like you are experiencing his life.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was forced to read this book for school, and it was one of the worst experiences of my life. Typically the reading material in school, while sometime boring, is always an example of good literature: well written with realistic dialogue, evolving characters, and sufficient symbolism and metaphor to have an essay writing field day. This book however, was not an example of good literature, or even a good story. The fact of the matter is, you could have the greatest story in the world, but if it¿s not written well, then it¿s not good literature.
And frankly this is not the greatest story in the world; it¿s not even that unique. A boy is really enthusiastic about the war, and comes home paralyzed; it happened to a lot of people. Which is not to say I don¿t feel for the guy, without a doubt his situation sucks. But that does not mean that he should vent all his rage, frustration and pent up feelings in a 200 page novel. If you want to expose the horror of war, or the mistreatment of veterans, feel free, but that is not what this novel is, this is some type of psychiatric stress reliever filled with both crude imagery and language, chiefly concerned with his inability to screw a woman. If you need catharsis, fine, write it down in a diary and stick it under your mattress, don¿t send it to a publisher and force me to read it.
In the end, this is an uncreative story written by a bitter man, who felt the need to inflict his suffering on readers everywhere with more than two hundred pages of angry drivel. If you want good war novels, try Slaughterhouse Five or The Things They Carried.