Borrower

Borrower

by Rebecca Makkai
3.6 61

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Overview

Borrower by Rebecca Makkai


In this delightful, funny, and moving first novel, a librarian and a young boy obsessed with reading take to the road.

Lucy Hull, a young children's librarian in Hannibal, Missouri, finds herself both a kidnapper and kidnapped when her favorite patron, ten- year-old Ian Drake, runs away from home. The precocious Ian is addicted to reading, but needs Lucy's help to smuggle books past his overbearing mother, who has enrolled Ian in weekly antigay classes with celebrity Pastor Bob. Lucy stumbles into a moral dilemma when she finds Ian camped out in the library after hours with a knapsack of provisions and an escape plan. Desperate to save him from Pastor Bob and the Drakes, Lucy allows herself to be hijacked by Ian. The odd pair embarks on a crazy road trip from Missouri to Vermont, with ferrets, an inconvenient boyfriend, and upsetting family history thrown in their path. But is it just Ian who is running away? Who is the man who seems to be on their tail? And should Lucy be trying to save a boy from his own parents?

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780434021000
Publisher: Heinemann, William Limited
Publication date: 07/28/2011
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author


REBECCA MAKKAI’s stories have been anthologized in The Best American Short Stories 2008, 2009, and 2010, and have appeared in Tin House, Ploughshares, The Threepenny Review, and on NPR’s Selected Shorts. Makkai teaches elementary school and lives north of Chicago with her husband and two daughters.

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The Borrower 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 61 reviews.
LaurenSleigh More than 1 year ago
It's too bad B and N has up only the Publishers Weekly review for this book, which is the only somewhat negative review I've seen (I researched before pitching to my club which reads new hardcover fiction the month it comes out). This book is hard to describe, but marvelous. It's about a children's librarian, and it has some of those same fantastical elements, larger than life characters, and the fast pace you would remember from the children's books you loved, but this is definitely for adults or teenagers at the youngest. There's a sort of "kidnapping" involved which is not really a kidnapping at all, and you could debate for weeks what actually happened. This is actually one of the things I think makes it a great pick for book clubs, and I imagine when it comes out in paperback a lot more clubs will be picking it. My club will read it next month and I'm sure it will stir a lot of debate, in a good way. Really this was a fast read, and I stayed up till 2 one morning to finish it, which is saying a lot (for me).
PHMMD More than 1 year ago
This is one of those books that really sticks with you. If you are a voracious reader, as I am, or if you have young children, as I do, you will catch (and be able to place) many of the literary references that the author includes in the book. Those make the book more interesting, but catching them is certainly not required to appreciate the novel's meaning or, certainly, to enjoy it. They just, in my opinion, make the ride more worthwhile. References aside, this is a fabulous book. It's relentlessly engrossing, but it's not your typical summer "beach read". It's so much more than that. It's a book lover's book in the best possible way, and not just because of the literary references. It's one of the first books I've read in a long time that I literally haven't been able to put down. And now that I've finished it, I wish I had read it more slowly so that I could still be enjoying it. A unique and very interesting plot, relatable and entertaining characters, and a plethora of "morals of the story". All spun together by someone who clearly has a way with words; Makkai is a fabulous storyteller, and I eagerly await her next work. Read this book now. You won't regret it.
Bookhoarder More than 1 year ago
Seriously, I bought five copies. I got this myself on my Nook, and then I bought four more copies for friends (three LGB friends who I thought would feel a kinship with one of the main characters, and one for my mother-in-law, who's a librarian like the other main character). It's truly a book for book-lovers, in the sense that it will take you back to what you first loved about books when you were a kid visiting your local library. The boy in the book, Ian, is ten and probably will be gay, and his parents are putting him in religious reprogramming with a celebrity pastor. It's really funny and well told, and I cared so much about what would happen to Ian by the end of the book. Totally a page turner, and so highly recommended.
stirwise More than 1 year ago
Rebecca Makkai's first novel is an intriguing and very engaging road trip story, owing equally to Lolita and Huckleberry Finn, with assistance from nearly every notable children's and YA book of the last century or so. On the surface this appears to be a story about a young, liberal English major-turned-librarian trying to help out a kid she perceives to be in trouble. Upon deeper inspection, though, you'll see a self-aware, unreliable narrator trying to fit the messiness of reality into the tidy confines of a story. It's a book about running away and growing up, about who we are and what we can change about ourselves, about youthful ideals and adult realities. It's really a pretty big effort, and I think Ms. Makkai succeeds admirably.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I give this book a zero rating. I finished it thinking it had to improve. It was borrrrring, way too long and the story line was way unrealistic. Boy, I sure wasted my money on this dud.
miztrebor More than 1 year ago
It’s not often I come across a book that I enjoyed so much, but can’t really write down words to convey my reaction. Instead of trying to write my review right away, I’ve given it a few days. I let the book play over in my head. I’m happy to say that the story is still fresh in my mind and I almost want to reread it already. Makkai have written an incredible début novel. The Borrower is filled with a cast of diverse and enjoyable characters, a mild suspense that keeps a reader flipping page after page, and a coming of age story of a unique sort. Not only is this an enchanting tale of Lucy and Ian’s cross-country trip/run from the law, it’s also a coming of age story about Lucy finding out about herself, her family, and contemplating something as large as the our nation of runaways. There are many different levels to pick this book apart from and each is as well-written as the others. I probably didn’t say much helpful in this review, but as I said, it’s hard to put my reaction into words for this book. Lucy and Ian are great characters, I was sad that this book didn’t have another 300 pages of them on an adventure. But I’m pleased with everything I read. Makkai will definitely be added to my list of favorite authors, even after reading only her début novel.
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JarrahZack More than 1 year ago
Young Ian is ceaselessly borrowing books from the library. Novice librarian Lucy develops a sort of maternal or sororal affection for him and winds up borrowing him for a road trip. Or does Ian borrow her? It's a dual coming of age story. Ian and Lucy learn (or perhaps Lucy relearns) that our elders don't always have the answers and that life is a continuing journey of self-discovery. Rebecca Makkai blends nostalgia for youth and children's literature with big questions about identity and family. The Borrower turns out to be an uplifting novel filled with humor, suspense and characters I'd love to spend a day with.
Plume_de_nom More than 1 year ago
This book literally had me laughing and crying. It is a wonderful and quirky story of a young woman and adolescent boy both coming of age, using their resources and good nature to defy convention in ways that work for them. It should be on more shelves.
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GreenEyedReader More than 1 year ago
I did not really enjoy this book but I always finish a story once I start it even if I'm not thrilled or don't like it. That being said, I gave it 3 stars for originality although the premise is so far fetched it was totally unbelievable; a Librarian who is pretty much unhappy in her present-and past-life who kidnaps-but not really-one of her child patrons and gets away with it, totally! I did enjoy the literary blurbs, having recognized all of them. At times it was amusing with an underlying moral of acceptance. I would not recommend this one to anyone I know.
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