Bottom of the Ninth: Branch Rickey, Casey Stengel, and the Daring Scheme to Save Baseball from Itself

Bottom of the Ninth: Branch Rickey, Casey Stengel, and the Daring Scheme to Save Baseball from Itself

by Michael Shapiro
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Bottom of the Ninth: Branch Rickey, Casey Stengel, and the Daring Scheme to Save Baseball from Itself 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
senated More than 1 year ago
An interesting story aboout how a third major league almsost materialized in the late 50's and early 60's, the principal characters involved, the cities of interest and the behind the scenes maneuvering. In my mind, however the book became confusing when ther were detailed stories of way too many people whose influence in the process was questionable. Adding to the confused plot was that the book moved back and forth chronologically within chapters. Stories of certain players of the era were interesting, but not really relevant. The bottom line- most of those cities that were proposed for the new league eventually got their team.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
PoconoJoe More than 1 year ago
I bought this book to find out more about how the Continental League lead to major league expansion. The book had a lot of good infomaton but I don't understand why there were sections on the Casey Stengel, the Yankees, and the 1960 world series with the Pirates. It seemed like a lot of research was done on that world series and it should have been used in a separate book, not here where it seemed like padding. Those pages could have been better used discussing the Buffalo, Dallas, and Atlanta proposed franchises and how and when they were added to the initially proposed five. Also there was no real follow up on the collapse of the proposed league after expansion was announced. Since 6 different ownership groups (and 6 cities) from the Continental League were rejected when expansion occurred, there should have been some strong reactions from those left out. Those feeling could have been explored, if possible.