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The Bracelet
     

The Bracelet

5.0 1
by Miriam D Rosier (Illustrator), Miriam Rosier (Illustrator)
 

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Teddy is not Miss Thompson's favorite student. He doesn't focus in class, his homework is never complete, and he comes to school unkempt. When, at Christmas, Teddy gives Miss Thompson a bottle of cheap perfume and a rhinestone bracelet with half the stones missing, Miss Thompson is confused-until she discovers that these items had belonged to his recently deceased

Overview

Teddy is not Miss Thompson's favorite student. He doesn't focus in class, his homework is never complete, and he comes to school unkempt. When, at Christmas, Teddy gives Miss Thompson a bottle of cheap perfume and a rhinestone bracelet with half the stones missing, Miss Thompson is confused-until she discovers that these items had belonged to his recently deceased mother. Miss Thompson's profound realization changes her attitude and behavior forever; in turn, young Teddy begins to truly blossom. The Bracelet is a heartwarming story of how one person can deeply affect another person's life, and it will touch everyone who reads it.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
De Rosier makes her debut with this small-format gift book that adapts "The Special Story of Miss Thompson" (which first appeared in Who Switched the Price Tags?). A statement from Miss Thompson, the teacher, opens the book: "Boys and girls, I love you all the same. I have no favorites." But the unnamed narrator immediately detracts her remarks: "Teachers do have favorites and, what is worse, most teachers have students that they just don't like." Fifth grader Teddy is one of them. A rundown of his former teachers' reports reveals that he has a "poor home situation," a mother who was seriously ill and subsequently died and a father who "shows no interest." Sequential paintings show Teddy sitting on his mother's lap in a comfy armchair to read a story, then on the next page the chair is empty. The unadorned paintings resemble pleasant folk-art in their attention to simple patterns and slightly off-kilter perspectives. Yet the artwork remains rather static and wooden, a curious counterpoint to the story's sentimentality and overbearing tone. At Christmas, Teddy gives his teacher a bracelet with missing stones and a "bottle of cheap perfume." After the boy confides, "Miss Thompson, you smell just like my mother. And her bracelet looks real pretty on you, too," she asks God to forgive her, and becomes "a different teacher." With the special attention she pays to Teddy, his schoolwork improves dramatically, and causes positive reverberations henceforth. Though it may appeal to adults who work with youngsters as a cautionary tale, this heavy-handed story sends a mixed message to children. Ages 8-up. (Oct.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Honest teachers will admit that it is possible to dislike a student. Ms. Jean Thompson was no exception. Teddy Stallard, the new kid with the unkempt clothes, blank expression, and difficult home life, wasn't very likeable. Academic reports were filled with comments like slow learner, could do better, no support from home. At Christmas when the other children placed their brightly colored packages on the teacher's desk, Teddy's brown paper sack held together with scotch tape stood out among the rest. The homely bag held a gaudy bracelet and some cheap perfume. At day's end when Ms. Thompson learned from the boy that these treasures once belonged to his deceased mother she felt ashamed. In the days that followed, Ms. Thompson exhibited more compassion for the lonely boy and under her tutelage Teddy thrived. A postscript, in the form of letters from Teddy to his teacher, tells of Teddy's success as an adult. The message that one teacher can make a difference in the life of a child is heavy handed in this gentle but saccharine story. Adapted from a short story, the simple text is complemented with watercolor and gouache illustrations that bear the artistic style of a graphic artist with their angular figures and flat surfaces. The illustrator's use of light and shadow give depth to the paintings. Expect to see copies of this book brightly wrapped and given to teachers at the end of the school year from well-meaning parents. Not a first purchase. 2003, Gibb Smith Publisher, Ages adult.
—Beverley Fahey

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781586850500
Publisher:
Smith, Gibbs Publisher
Publication date:
08/13/2003
Edition description:
1ST
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,284,264
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 7.00(h) x 0.37(d)
Age Range:
15 Years

Read an Excerpt

On the first day of school, Jean Thompson told her students, "Boys and girls, I love you all the same. I have no favorites."

Of course, she wasn't being completely truthful. Teachers do have favorites and, what is worse, most teachers have students that they just don't like.

Teddy Stallard was a boy that Miss Thompson just didn't like. He didn't seem interested in school. There was a deadpan, blank expression on his face and his eyes had a glassy, unfocused appearance. When she spoke to Teddy, he always answered in monosyllables. His clothes were musty and his hair was unkempt. He wasn't an attractive boy and he certainly wasn't likable.

Teachers have records. And Jean Thompson had Teddy's.

Meet the Author

Miriam D Rosier is a native of Washington State. She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts from Brigham Young University. Ms. de Rosier works as a freelance illustrator; her work has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Wall Street Journal.

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The Bracelet 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This story is about more than a little boy, it is about why a person would choose to teach. Teachers rarely see the finished product of their work but in this story of hope the the teacher gets to see the final product of what she helped create. I did get this book as a present from one of my students and think it is a great teacher gift.