Breakfast of Champions, or Goodbye Blue Monday

Breakfast of Champions, or Goodbye Blue Monday

by Kurt Vonnegut
4.3 245

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Breakfast of Champions; or, Goodbye, Blue Monday 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 245 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anyone familiar with any of Kurt Vonnegut's works will not be disappointed by this classic satire. It features characters recurring in his novels - Kilgore Trout, Eliot Rosewater, and Rabo Karebakian - as well as fresh inventions, whose stories collude to turn any reader into a social cynic. The novel is narrated by Vonnegut, who directs his monologue at a reader unfamiliar with Earth and its customs. Because of that, he is compelled to frequently illustrate his point - whether it be with a sketch of a vagina or an electric chair - to great comic effect. Early in the book he states that he needs to empty his mind of useless clutter, which he would seem to do quite effectively, though what may seem to be a random outburst will be, without fail, a cleverly constructed social criticism. Readers familiar with works such as Slaughterhouse V will be pleasantly surprised to find that they already have a fair bit of background on Kilgore Trout, the protagonist, as well as Eliot Rosewater, whom one may remember shares a hospital room with Billy Pilgrim in Slaughterhouse. Kilgore becomes quite lovable in this installment. One of the more profound scenes occurs at the very end and features Vonnegut as character as well as narrator. He and Trout have an excellent dialog that I shall not spoil here. It is sufficient to say that it caps a very good point Vonnegut makes throughout the book regarding the control people have over their own actions. In summary, an excellent read.
Nellix More than 1 year ago
Breakfast of Champions was a book by Kurt Vonnegut. That's really all I have to say about the book to make it what it is. It's impolite, but acceptable. It was meant to be both at the same time, and that's what it was. It was everywhere but on the page. There wasn't for one second when I was reading that book that I thought of it as a book. I thought of it as an idea, or a million different ideas, which I believe is the way that the book was meant to be taken. A different view for every subject that has a view. What lots of people seem to say about this book is that it is a symbol for something. A story about the tragedies of war, of mental illness, about how life can change you, about coincidence. People try and find meaning in this book. They call it literature, and give it importance, and give it fancy titles and symbolism that is everything they think it is, that they want it to be, much like the lives of people in Midland City. I believe this book was intended for everyone to read, if not for everyone to understand. It gives perspectives that only someone like Kurt Vonnegut would think of. That being, no one else. The titles 'Breakfast of Champions' and 'Goodbye, Blue Monday' both fit the story if you read it. Seemingly interesting as well, to those who don't know the story behind it. Part of which is what made me pick it up. The way that Kurt puts himself in his books to further the story is what gives them his personal style, and which is particularly evident in this novel of his. He isn't afraid to stray from the conventions of rules of grammar, or typical book structure. A drawing here and there to further illustrate the point gives it not meaning but voice. Conventions aside; This story, this book, this philosophy gives thought, gives a closer look to aspects of daily life which most don't think about. And for those who aren't trying to look to deep into the pages, but just looking for something to pass the time, it's still a good read.
Rutger-B More than 1 year ago
Breakfast of Champions is a great book for Vonnegut lovers. It differentiates itself from his other books, and because of this it may be difficult to get into for those who don't admire Mr. Vonnegut. The reader can sense the care and emotion Vonnegut put into this novel as opposed to his others, such as Cat's Cradle. He clearly states his views and thoughts on society, art, and more specifically on literature. His life experiences have a healthy influence on this novel, but to make things more personal he gives his opinions on those experiences. You don't have to agree with them to appreciate this book. I would highly recommend this book to anyone who loves Vonnegut.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My first Vonnegut novel... loved it... addictive. I read it through so maany times. Hard to follow at times... but probably because I read it too young (16) but still... Great! ^_^
Guest More than 1 year ago
A naïve and spiritual yet satirist and explicit masterpiece, Kurt Vonnegut¿s Breakfast of Champions exploits the pitfalls and shortcomings of American society through the offbeat observations, colorful journeys, and rhetorical questions of ill-minded ¿machines¿, and of Vonnegut himself. Issues ranging from racism, sexism, intolerance, and profanity to pollution, ignorance, capitalism, imperialism, and jingoism all come to the surface as Vonnegut teaches us how to see the truth. Breakfast of Champions follows the unconventional lives of two men, a mentally-deteriorating ¿well-to-do¿ car salesman from an unknown Midwest town and an old, unorthodox writer who lives alone and ¿unknown,¿ as well as familiar characters parodied. Mysterious consequences (and an art fair) bring these two men to cross paths, as their journeys, and the people along the way, are deeply examined. Vonnegut beautifully constructs this impeccable tragedy of consequence and ¿adapting to chaos.¿
SurferJeff More than 1 year ago
I loved every word. A story about flawed people.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Bethann2 More than 1 year ago
A wonderful, funny & poignant book that should be required reading in every high school and college in America.  Vonnegut - who at turns sounds like a pretentious 15-year-old prodigy and Philboyd Studge, is nonetheless one of the best writers you'll ever encounter. 
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Skidrow82 More than 1 year ago
Check it out, it's hilarious, clever and irreverent. Almost every page will make you laugh.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
First Vonnegut book I read, wil always love it. Second favorite Vonnegut novel.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
WOW! Can't get enough of Vonnegut. Highly enjoyable. Laugh out loud funny with lots of satire. Vonnegut has a way of teaching without teaching. I will read all his books if I can find them. He is masterful with his black comedy.More please!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is the first book i've read by Vonnegut and it definitely won't be my last!
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jr8383942 More than 1 year ago
This is classic Vonnegut. Funny, smart and unbound by the structure of his own work. It's a work of a paradoxes, in some ways mocking American life, while simultaneously betraying a great fondness for it.