Breath, Eyes, Memory

Breath, Eyes, Memory

by Edwidge Danticat
4.6 23

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Overview

Breath, Eyes, Memory by Edwidge Danticat

At the age of twelve, Sophie Caco is sent from her impoverished village of Croix-des-Rosets to New York, to be reunited with a mother she barely remembers. There she discovers secrets that no child should ever know, and a legacy of shame that can be healed only when she returns to Haiti--to the women who first reared her. What ensues is a passionate journey through a landscape charged with the supernatural and scarred by political violence, in a novel that bears witness to the traditions, suffering, and wisdom of an entire people.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781569477960
Publisher: Soho Press, Incorporated
Publication date: 07/01/2003
Sold by: Penguin Random House Publisher Services
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 236
Sales rank: 161,801
File size: 892 KB

About the Author

Edwidge Danticat is the author of numerous books, including Brother, I’m Dying, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award and was a National Book Award finalist; Breath, Eyes, Memory, an Oprah Book Club selection; Krik? Krak!, a National Book Award finalist; The Dew Breaker, winner of the inaugural Story Prize; The Farming of Bones, which won an American Book Award for fiction in 1999; and Claire of the Sea Light. The recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship, she has been published in The New YorkerThe New York Times, and elsewhere.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

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Breath, Eyes, Memory 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 23 reviews.
Emmanuel Guerrier More than 1 year ago
As a haitian having lived in Haiti for a few years in Haiti and raised by haitian parents in America, i was able to relate. I saw the character's grandmother as my own in certain instances. The characters were simple but from a complex culture. Also, it always fascinates me on the way we as haitians assimilate in America.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Normally a fan of Oprah's book club selections, I trusted her expertise in selecting this book, having never read anything by the author before. The storyline was interesting and the scenes depicting the Haitian culture were nice. However, the story line could have been better developed,and quite frankly it left me wanting more. The development of the main characters took place much too quickly, and left me having to figure things out or make my own assumptions. There were also quite a bit of grammatical errors in the e-book, that were just too frequent to not notice. Despite this, all in all it was an ok read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Your heart will reach out for the women in this book.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is one of the best books I have ever reade
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In all her books she gives a glimpsr of haiti and immigrant life. Complex is the best word to describe her characters.
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Phileasee Porter More than 1 year ago
Cant+wait+to+read+more+from+this+author
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Breath, Eyes, Memory by Edwidge Danticat Have you ever wondered what it would be like to be a Haitian woman? Well, this book; which was selected by Oprah Winfrey for her book club, is just what you¿re looking for. The plot follows four generations of women through the eyes of Sophie Caco. She is torn between a mother who she has never met and the aunt who raised her. When Sophie is sent to America to meet her mother, she finds that her mother is tramatized from a rape that happened years before. She tries to help her mother as much as she can, but she cannot do much. After Sophie has grown up and has her own family, she realizes that her mother is a lot worse than she ever thought. Read this book and find out if Sophie can help her mother in time or not. This award winning author captures the hearts of many as you follow the struggles and victories of a Haitian heritage. I highly recommend this book. I thought this book was very appealing and out of the ordinary. You feel as if you know the characters personally as soon as you start reading. Danticat captures your attention and doesn¿t let it go until the end of the book. She tells a story in a fascinating way that I¿m sure will be a favorite of many women through out the world. The Sunday Times states ¿Stuffed with folk wisdom and seasoned with a sprinkling of urban angst, Breath, Eyes, Memory offers a brief thumbnail sketch of life in the Haitian diaspora, as well as a vivid portrayal of rural Haiti¿It offers hope through its vision of a female solidarity which transcends place and time.¿
Guest More than 1 year ago
I DEFINITELY RELATE TO SOPHIE. I GREW UP WITH MY UNCLE AND GRAND-MOTHER IN HAITI. LIFE WAS GOOD BECAUSE MY PARENTS SEND MONEY EVERY MONTH. AT THE AGE OF 14, MY FATHER BROUGHT ME AND MY TWO BROTHERS TO THE US AND WE WERE DEVASTATED. WE DIDN'T HAVE A CHANCE TO SAY GOODBYE TO OUR FRIENDS AND FAMILY. ONE DAY, MY FATHER CAME AND TOLD US WE WERE GOING TO PORT-AU-PRINCE FOR A WEEK. IT'S BEEN EIGHT YEARS SINCE I'VE BEEN THERE. DANTICAT'S BOOK GAVE ME MOTIVATION TO GO BACK TO SAY A PROPER GOODBYE TO MY GRAND-MOTHER AND MY DECEASED UNCLES. LIKE SOPHIE, I RECENTLY LOST A MOTHER I NEVER REALLY KNEW, WE NEVER HAD A CHANCE TO SHARE ANY MOTHER AND DAUGHTER SECRETS. NOW, I MUST FACE THE WOLRD ALONE. I JUST WANT TO SAY THANK YOU TO MS. DANTICAT FOR WRITING SUCH A WONDERFUL BOOK. I FELT LIKE I WAS THERE WITH ALL THE CHARACTERS IN THE BOOK.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In a time where the sexuality of women of the African diaspora is becoming a greater part of black women's discourse, 'Breath, Eyes, Memory' serves as a point of reference through which this conversation can begin. Edwidge Danticat informs her readers of the ways in which the past can come back to haunt not only you, but those to follow. And for this, I thank her.