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Breezier, Cheesier, Newest, and Bluest: What Are Comparatives and Superlatives?
     

Breezier, Cheesier, Newest, and Bluest: What Are Comparatives and Superlatives?

4.0 1
by Brian P. Cleary, Brian Gable (Illustrator)
 

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What are comparatives and superlatives? After reading this book, you'll have a much clearer idea and will be the best at forming these descriptive words! Brian P. Cleary and Brian Gable explain how these forms of adjectives compare nouns, through the cleverest rhymes and illustrations that are sillier than ever. Each comparative or superlative word is printed in

Overview

What are comparatives and superlatives? After reading this book, you'll have a much clearer idea and will be the best at forming these descriptive words! Brian P. Cleary and Brian Gable explain how these forms of adjectives compare nouns, through the cleverest rhymes and illustrations that are sillier than ever. Each comparative or superlative word is printed in color for easier identification.

Breezier, Cheesier, Newest, and Bluest: What Are Comparatives and Superlatives? turns traditional grammar lessons on end. Read it aloud and share in the delight of the sense—and nonsense—of words.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Justina Engebretson
Before entering school, children are already using comparatives and superlatives, whether they can pronounce these big words or not. They already know what their "most favorite" desert is and that they are "taller" than their baby brother; however, they often do not know why they say "more favorite" instead of "favoritest" or "bigger" instead of "biggest." With this delightful picture book, young primary students can learn the rules for comparative and superlative terms. From simply adding "-er" to a word when comparing two things or "-est" when comparing three or more things to the exceptions to the rules, the instructional content of this book is concise and appropriate for a young audience. The accompanying illustrations are both colorful and absurd, visually representing the text while adding a dose of humor. Cleary provides a "How to Form Comparatives and Superlatives" chart at the back of the book for easy access. The chart lists the rules for changing a word to a comparative or superlative and provides an example of each. This chart provides an excellent activity extension as it could be copied, so students could add their own comparative and superlative terms, creating a valuable writing reference to put on display in the classroom. This book will be of greatest interest to first and second grade teachers and students. Part of the "Words Are CATegorical" series. Reviewer: Justina Engebretson
Kirkus Reviews
Cleary and Gable, those relatively cool cats, continue their Words are CATegorical series with this entry about comparatives and superlatives. Taking comparatives and superlatives in turn, Cleary walks readers through the basic rule of adding -er/-est, then branches out to state that sometimes "more" or "most" is added at the front instead, and there are some words that have no set rules (good, bad, far). "Try taking a / describing word, / like bright. / Now add e-r. / You've made it a comparative / to name the brighter star." Gable's illustrations are the true stars here, his feline characters brimming with personality. The "brighter" spread features a sunglasses-clad, red-carpet star preening for a camera. The facing page shows the spotlights and cameras trained on a flashier diva, the original looking on in consternation. Bright backgrounds provide contrast for the cats' hues, while the comparatives and superlatives are printed in color, contrasting with the black text. While Cleary nails his rhythms and rhymes for the most part, the sheer implausibility and craziness of some of his choices (the "longest curl" on a cat?) may give readers pause and interrupt the flow. Too, readers will want to savor the zaniness introduced by Gable's pictures: "quietest" and "queasiest" sit side by side on a ride, the one a mime with a finger to his lips, the other a shocking shade of green. Perhaps not the best, but better than many grammar books--definitely one to check out. (grammar rules) (Informational picture book. 7-9)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780761353621
Publisher:
Lerner Publishing Group
Publication date:
09/28/2012
Pages:
31
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 7.20(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
630L (what's this?)
Age Range:
6 - 9 Years

Meet the Author

Brian P. Cleary is the author of the Math Is CATegorical® series, the Adventures in Memory™ series, the Sounds Like Reading® series, the Food Is CATegorical™ series, the Animal Groups Are CATegorical™ series, and the best-selling Words Are CATegorical® series. In addition to his work as a children's author, he has served as a tutor in an adult literacy program.

Brian Gable is the illustrator of many of the Words Are CATegorical ® books, as well as the Make Me Laugh joke books and the Math Is CATegorical ® series. Mr. Gable lives in Toronto, Canada, where he also works as a political cartoonist for the Globe and Mail newspaper.

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Breezier, Cheesier, Newest, and Bluest: What Are Comparatives and Superlatives? 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Andrea_C More than 1 year ago
I love this series of books. They provide simple grammar lessons with fun rhymes, pictures and text. This one provides a simple overview of the rules used when making adjectives into comparatives and superlatives. It doesn't serve as a sole explanation for all of the rules and exceptions, but is a great introduction for more formal grammar lessons. It could be read to kindergartners as a foundation for their language skills, and definitely used in early elementary. I received an eARC of this title in exchange for my honest review.