Brendan Malone: The Last Fenian

Brendan Malone: The Last Fenian

by Marina J. Neary

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780984629749
Publisher: All Things That Matter Press
Publication date: 01/15/2011
Pages: 208
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.48(d)

About the Author

Marina Julia Neary is an award-winning historical essayist, multilingual arts & entertainment journalist, novelist, dramatist and poet. Her areas of expertise include British steam-punk, French Romanticism and Irish nationalism. Her novel Wynfield's Kingdom (Fireship Press, 2009) was featured in the March 2010 edition of First Edition Magazine in the UK, followed by the sequel Wynfield's War in 2010. She is the author of two historical plays, Hugo in London (licensing available through Heuer), and the sequel Lady with a Lamp: the Untold Story of Florence Nightingale (illustrated edition available through Fireship Press). Her poems have been organized in a collection Bipolar Express (Flutter Press, 2010). Her sci-fi novelette My Salieri Complex is available as an e-book through Gypsy Shadow Press. Brendan Malone: the Last Fenian is her first novel exploring early 20th century Irish nationalism. Neary currently serves as an editorial reviewer and steady contributor for Bewildering Stories magazine.

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Brendan Malone: The Last Fenian 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Sugarpeach on LibraryThing 19 days ago
Brendan Malone: The Last Fenian is based on historical events of the Irish fight against the British. Told from the Irish point of view, it is set in the early 1900s. Strangely, the language used by Neary in the story reminds me of Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. The way the characters converse with each other and their manner of speech is so alike that of Pride and Prejudice¿s characters!This book does not have a happy ending and there are no hints whatsoever in the synopsis that would prepare a reader for the final tragedy. Neary does not narrate the tragedy in a way that would cause a reader to cry (that is, if you are the type who cries when reading sad stories), but the narration gives a reader the impression that although the whole tragic incident is unfortunate, life¿s routine still goes on.Apart from the phrase ¿Pull his head into his shoulders¿, that I did not quite understand, the book¿s prose is good. Scenes in the book change frequently and that might confuse some readers but other than that, it is quite an enjoyable read.Overall, I would highly recommend this book to fans of historical fiction books. If you are the type of person who remembers historical incidents through stories, this book is for you. While there are not many historical events referred to in the book, readers can glean some knowledge of how the Irish viewed their freedom fight.
Evangeline_Han More than 1 year ago
Brendan Malone is a member of the Irish Republican Brotherhood (IRB). His dream is to see Ireland free of British rule. And needless to say, he hates the British with all his heart and soul. Brendan sends his two sons to the prestigious University College Dublin and, upon their graduation, expects them to follow in his footsteps to fight against the British. Dylan, the eldest son, only thinks of drinking and women. When his father pushes him to take the Oath of the IRB, he willingly complies. The same cannot be said of his younger brother, Hugh. Hugh excels academically and has a mind of his own. Tired of carving out his life according to his father's wishes, he does something that will eventually earn him the wrath of his father. Brendan Malone: The Last Fenian is based on historical events of the Irish fight against the British. Told from the Irish point of view, it is set in the early 1900s. Strangely, the language used by Neary in the story reminds me of Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen. The way the characters converse with each other and their manner of speech is so alike that of Pride and Prejudice's characters! This book does not have a happy ending and there are no hints whatsoever in the synopsis that would prepare a reader for the final tragedy. Neary does not narrate the tragedy in a way that would cause a reader to cry (that is, if you are the type who cries when reading sad stories), but the narration gives a reader the impression that although the whole tragic incident is unfortunate, life's routine still goes on. Apart from the phrase "Pull his head into his shoulders", that I did not quite understand, the book's prose is good. Scenes in the book change frequently and that might confuse some readers but other than that, it is quite an enjoyable read. Overall, I would highly recommend this book to fans of historical fiction books. If you are the type of person who remembers historical incidents through stories, this book is for you. While there are not many historical events referred to in the book, readers can glean some knowledge of how the Irish viewed their freedom fight.