The Bridesmaid

The Bridesmaid

by Ruth Rendell

NOOK Book(eBook)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781453210994
Publisher: Open Road Media
Publication date: 12/28/2010
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 260
Sales rank: 272,282
File size: 4 MB

About the Author

Edgar Award–winning author Ruth Rendell (1930–2015) has written more than seventy books that have sold more than 20 million copies worldwide. A fellow of the Royal Society of Literature (London), she is the recipient of the Grand Master Award from the Mystery Writers of America and a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Crime Writers’ Association. Rendell’s award-winning novels include A Demon in My View (1976), A Dark-Adapted Eye (1987), and King Solomon’s Carpet (1991). Her popular crime stories featuring Chief Inspector Reginald Wexford were adapted into a long-running British television series (1987–2000) starring George Baker.


Edgar Award–winning author Ruth Rendell (b. 1930) has written more than seventy books and sold more than twenty million copies worldwide. A fellow of the Royal Society of Literature (London), she is the recipient of the Grand Master Award from the Mystery Writers of America and a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Crime Writers’ Association. Rendell’s award-winning novels include A Demon in My View (1976), A Dark-Adapted Eye (1987), and King Solomon’s Carpet (1991). Her popular crime stories featuring Chief Inspector Reginald Wexford were adapted into a long-running British television series (1987–2000) starring George Baker.

Date of Birth:

February 17, 1930

Place of Birth:

London, England

Education:

Loughton County High School for Girls, Essex

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The Bridesmaid 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Bookmarque on LibraryThing 7 months ago
Rendell does it again, giving us a perfect portrayal of madness and how people can end up trapped by circumstance and biology. What I like most about the way Rendell develops characters is that no one is completely one-sided. Sure, Philip is a bit of a dolt, but only a bit. In many ways he¿s a normal bloke just trying to get out from under his lower-middle class situation. He¿s got a decent, entry-level job and a close knit family. He¿s not inexperienced as far as women go, but he is inexperienced with real craziness. When Senta starts to say strange, unbelievable things, he treats her with skepticism as anyone would. Then when some things she says turn out to be true, he falls apart. His carefully constructed idea that her fantasies are harmless turns out to be just as illusory as her connection to reality.Philip¿s indecision and anguish over his circumstances is very palpable. He¿s confused and only wants to do right by everyone. There are some family crises simmering at the same time and those provide some supporting drama that adds to the feeling of coming apart. Work problems boil over a bit, too, and I really felt empathy for Philip¿s plight. We can see he¿s being played, but are still powerless to help. Not that many writers can pull this off.Again, the ending is more ambiguous than many thrillers. Ideas are muted, conclusions implied only, leaving the reader to put things together independently. Love that. She skillfully draws our eyes off the ball for long enough that when it smacks us in the head, we¿re stunned, but not really surprised. I had to go back and read some things over again just to make sure my final thoughts were justified. A well-done and memorable story.
jayne_charles on LibraryThing 8 months ago
This book just made me feel a bit queasy. Thank God it was only fiction! Seriously creepy, just a little bit weird, and once again Ruth Rendell delves into her book of weird character names.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
As always, Ruth Rendell¿s books pack a punch. Or several. And in ¿The Bridesmaid,¿ Rendell stays true to form, basically. While most Rendell fans recognize her as the author of the fascinating Inspector Wexford series, she also writes other thrillers. She also writes even chillier thrillers under the name of Barbara Vine. Regardless of which nom de plume she uses, it is difficult to find a writer who can explore--even reveal--the psychological pathways with the effectiveness she demonstrates. Philip Wardman, destined it seems, meets the mysterious Senta Pelham, an actress, most childlike, at Philip¿s sister¿s wedding. Theirs is a relationship that is made in you-know-where. Senta¿s affections do not come without a price. To ¿prove¿ their love, she insists that each of them must kill someone. Not your everyday pre-nuptial agreement, to be sure, and certainly not a characteristic of the genteel English society circles they live in! Certainly, ¿The Bridesmaid¿ is a disturbing work and Rendell sees to it that the reader is not comfortable with the situation. The author¿s craft and technique are clearly demonstrated here and reverberate with a force that is both chilling and sensational. Queasy too. An uncomfortable--yet powerful--read.