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Brotherhood of Corruption: A Cop Breaks the Silence on Police Abuse, Brutality, and Racial Profiling
     

Brotherhood of Corruption: A Cop Breaks the Silence on Police Abuse, Brutality, and Racial Profiling

3.8 4
by Juan Antonio Juarez
 

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ISBN-10: 1556525362

ISBN-13: 9781556525360

Pub. Date: 08/28/2004

Publisher: Chicago Review Press, Incorporated


A former Chicago cop exposes shocking truths about the abuses of power within the city’s police department in this memoir of violence, drugs, and men with badges. Juarez becomes a police officer because he wants to make a difference in gang-infested neighborhoods; but, as this book reveals, he ends up a corrupt member of the most powerful gang of

Overview


A former Chicago cop exposes shocking truths about the abuses of power within the city’s police department in this memoir of violence, drugs, and men with badges. Juarez becomes a police officer because he wants to make a difference in gang-infested neighborhoods; but, as this book reveals, he ends up a corrupt member of the most powerful gang of all—the Chicago police force. Juarez shares the horrific indiscretions he witnessed during his seven years of service, from the sexually predatory officer, X, who routinely stops beautiful women for made-up traffic offenses and flirts with domestic violence victims, to sadistic Locallo, known on the streets as Locoman, who routinely stops gang members and beats them senseless. Working as a narcotics officer, Juarez begins to join his fellow officers in crossing the line between cop and criminal, as he takes advantage of his position and also becomes a participant in a system of racial profiling legitimized by the war on drugs. Ultimately, as Juarez discusses, his conscience gets the better of him and he tries to reform, only to be brought down by his own excesses. From the perspective of an insider, he tells of widespread abuses of power, random acts of brutality, and the code of silence that keeps law enforcers untouchable.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781556525360
Publisher:
Chicago Review Press, Incorporated
Publication date:
08/28/2004
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.90(d)

Table of Contents

Contents

Acknowledgments,
1 A Taste of Authority,
2 Shattered Family,
3 Dreaming of an Escape,
4 Out of the Shadows,
5 Flight of the Phoenix,
6 Initiation,
7 Perks and Privileges,
8 Good Cop, Bad Cop,
9 Find 'em and Fuck 'em,
10 A Piece of the Action,
11 Prince of the City,
12 Crossing the Line,
13 Lucky's Way,
14 Sitting Ducks,
15 The Need for a Change,
16 Welcome to Paradise,
17 Operation Iron Wedge,
18 Operation Altgeld Gardens,
19 Mistaken Identity: Wrong Place, Wrong Time,
20 It's Just a Numbers Game,
21 Operation "Risky Business",
22 Big Money, Big Dope, Big Mistake,
23 Hey, Where's the Money?,
24 A World Apart,
25 Summer Mobile Unit,
26 Nitwit Police,
27 Dill Donald,
28 Who Really Knows?,
29 Time to Pay the Piper,
30 The Youth Shall Pay,
31 Summer Mobile Unit Redux,
32 Tavern Team,
33 And Then There Were None,
34 We Just Having Ourselves a Little Fun,
35 Mistaken Identity or Ignorance — "Hey, I Don't Wanna Listen",
36 Last Call,
37 The Airport Story,
38 Facing the Music,
39 Parting Ways,
Epilogue,
The Dirty Truth by the Numbers,
Glossary,
Sources,

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Brotherhood of Corruption: A Cop Breaks the Silence on Police Abuse, Brutality, and Racial Profiling 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book tells tales of truth that every kid growing up in the streets of Chicago already knew, since many have suffered the same experiences the author reveals to the reader. As a life-long resident of Chicago, I have seen many of my friends (and some of my family) come face to face with police brutality and profiling. It leaves one feeling helpless to change the status quo: who would listen to street kids and believe their stories? Who would have the power to change how things operate in the police department, even if they believed the stories? Who would care? I am thrilled that one cop finally came forward to put the truth on the line for the world to see. Now what? Maybe now the good cops will prevail and the bad cops will not. Maybe.
achristina More than 1 year ago
I read this book for a class. I am not much of a reader but I couldn't put the book down. I read some reviews on amazon on this book and how people thought Juan Juarez was just as quilty as all the other police offiers and he was just looking to make money on writing about it because he got caught. I don't fully agree with that. People change and yes he got caught up with some of the bad cops in the department and he used his power to get what he wanted. Juan opened up to the people who wanted to hear his story, he didn't keep hush about it after he got caught. He was a good person trying to make something of himself, in the process he took a detour and got a job. He eventually got to where he needs to be and I am happy for him. Everyone starts somewhere whether being good or bad. He lived and learned and is living a better life. Good for him. I enjoyed the reading.
alabamajusticegap More than 1 year ago
Juan was pretty honest about not being a super cop. My interpretation was that he blamed no one but him self and from other books I've read the system is VERY corrupt, violent and protective of ONLY their own in every city. Many other authors corroborate Juan Juarez's account of drug busts and skate assignments, corruption and brutal violence. "Anonymous" should have the courage to put his real name to the review. I think the review that he/she wrote is fiction or they would have included their name.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book should be listed under FICTION. Juan buoyed himself up to be s supercop brought down by the system. This is fantasy. He only spend a year in a beat car and was described (at best) by his co-workers as lazy and uninspired. His connections got him to the Narcotics Section, where his terrible work ethic, immaturity, and disdain for his fellow officers was apparent from day one. He was tolerated there, mainly because of respect for the family members he had on the police department (including father, step-mother and cousin). He fed upon the system and used it to his every advantage. It is fiction for him to say that the system corrupted him. He came to us corrupt and just got worse.