ISBN-10:
013520545X
ISBN-13:
9780135205457
Pub. Date:
10/30/1998
Publisher:
Pearson Education
Building School and Community Partnerships Through Parent Involvement / Edition 1

Building School and Community Partnerships Through Parent Involvement / Edition 1

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780135205457
Publisher: Pearson Education
Publication date: 10/30/1998
Edition description: Older Edition
Pages: 339
Product dimensions: 7.45(w) x 9.14(h) x 0.51(d)

Table of Contents

PART I Families and Schools in Contemporary Society 1(80)
The Parent-School Connection
3(26)
Status and Profile of American Families
5(5)
Violence and the American Families
6(2)
Female Employment
8(2)
Divorce, Separation, and Remarriage
10(3)
Economic Uncertainty
11(1)
Child Poverty
12(1)
Resilient Children and Families
13(1)
Status of Children in the United Status
13(1)
Legislative Efforts on behalf of Families
14(2)
Interrelationships Among Families, Schools, and Communities
16(1)
Ecosystems, the School, and the Family
16(1)
Parents, Schools, and Communities
17(6)
A Case for Parent Involvement
17(1)
Collaborative Role of the School
18(3)
Collaborative Role of Families
21(1)
Collaborative Role of Communities
22(1)
An Overview of Collaboration Strategies
23(2)
Summary
25(4)
A Mosaic of Parent Involvement Models
29(22)
Interconnectedness of Families to Near and Far Environments
31(3)
A History of Families and Childhood
34(11)
A.D. 1 to 1600
35(1)
1600 to 1700
35(2)
1800 to 1900
37(1)
1900 to 1950
38(1)
1950 to 2000
39(6)
Models for Involving Parents
45(6)
Protective Model
45(1)
School to Home Transition Model
46(1)
Curriculum Enrichment Model
46(5)
Building Partnership with Families
51(30)
Collaborative Strategies
54(20)
Strategies Involving One-Way Communication
57(4)
Strategies Involving Two-Way Communication
61(13)
Selected Appropriate Strategies
74(7)
PART II Profiles of Individual Families in America 81(166)
Cross-Cultural Issues Involving Families and the Community
83(40)
Definitions and Role of Culture
87(6)
What is My Culture?
89(2)
Interactions Among Family, School, and Community
91(2)
Multicultural Education
93(4)
Development of Social and Moral Knowledge in Early Childhood
97(5)
Adults as Moral figures in the Lives of Children
99(2)
How Young Children Construct Knowledge
101(1)
Reflections on Developmentally Appropriate Practice and Diversity
102(2)
Understanding Characteristics of Diverse Groups
104(5)
Families of Anglo European Descent
105(1)
Families of African descent
106(1)
Families of Asian Descent
107(1)
Families of Hispanic Descent
108(1)
Families of Native American Descent
108(1)
Families of Children with Dual Heritage
109(1)
Summary of Practices for Inclusion of All Families
109(14)
Designing the Learning Environment: Possibilities for the Inclusion of Families and the Community
110(4)
An Interview with a Teacher
114(9)
Creating Community and School Linkages for Children with Special Needs
123(38)
Definitions and Incidence of Special Needs Children
124(3)
Politically Correct Terminology
125(1)
Dangers of Labeling
125(1)
The Law, Special Needs, and the School-Parent Partnership
126(1)
Incidence of Special Needs
127(2)
Psychological and Social Adaptations for the Family of Children with Special Needs
129(8)
The Family as Primary Socialization Agent
130(1)
The Family as Teacher
130(1)
Emotional Reactions and Issues of Parents
131(1)
The Grieving Process for the Family
131(1)
Normalization as a Goal
132(1)
Parent Advocacy
132(2)
Goals for Family Involvement
134(1)
Importance of Siblings
134(3)
Descriptions of Special Needs
137(5)
Role of Early childhood Professionals in Providing Family Support
142(5)
Creating the School-Family Link
143(1)
Defining the School's Role
143(1)
Identification, Assessment, and IEPs and IFSPs
144(3)
Community Resources and Collaboration Strategies
147(5)
Families Under Stress: A Community-Based Model
147(4)
Parent Empowerment and Self-Care
151(1)
Public Laws and Advocacy on Behalf of Families
152(9)
Appropriate Education for All Children: P.L. 94-142
152(1)
P.L. 99-457
152(1)
Other Important Legislation
153(1)
Developmentally Appropriate Practice: NAEYC
153(1)
Advocacy Groups and Initiatives in Early Intervention
154(2)
Advocay and Parent Empowerment
156(5)
Children of Divorced and Blended Families
161(34)
Definitions and Demographics: Divorced and Blended Families in the United States
163(2)
Impact of Divorce on Children: How the Schools Can Help
165(2)
Examples of Children's Responses in the Classroom
165(1)
Parental Emotions in Divorce
166(1)
Typical Child Responses to Divorce
167(1)
How Teachers Should Respond
167(4)
Teacher-Parent Responses
169(1)
Teacher Self-Assessment
169(1)
The need of Order and Consistency
170(1)
Practical Suggestions for Teachers
170(1)
A Teacher's Limits
171(1)
Demographics of Blended Families
171(9)
Characteristics of Stepfamilies
172(1)
Myths and Roles of Stepfamily Members
173(2)
Special Issues for Children in Blended Families
175(1)
What the Teacher and the Caregiver Need to Know
176(1)
Effects of Cumulative Stress
177(1)
Building Blocks and Assets of Blended Families
177(3)
Goals for Stepfamily Education
180(1)
Intervention Approaches for Families
181(5)
Bibliotherapy
181(3)
Focused Individual and Family Intervention
184(1)
Self-Help Parent Education Model
185(1)
Role of the School or Center
186(1)
Summary
187(8)
"Chosen" Children
195(28)
History of Adoption
198(1)
Characteristics of Families with Adopted Children
199(1)
Finding Children to Adopt
200(5)
Adopting Children of Other Countries and Races
201(3)
Parenting Adoptive and Foster Children with Special Needs and Challenges
204(1)
The Search for Self
205(1)
Developmental Issues for Individuals in Coping with Their Adoption
206(9)
Infancy
207(2)
Toddlerhood
209(1)
Preschool
210(2)
Middle Childhood
212(2)
Adolescence
214(1)
Young Adulthood
214(1)
Midlife
214(1)
Late Adulthood
214(1)
Strategies for Teachers and Caregivers
215(8)
Insight 1: The "Real" Child
215(1)
Insight 2: Take This Home to Mommy
216(1)
Insight 3: What Does Adopted Mean?
216(1)
Insight 4: I Need Someone Like Me
217(1)
Insihgt 5: My Child Is Special
218(5)
Alternative and Future Family Forms
223(24)
The Meaning of "Homosexuality"
225(5)
Families Headed by Gay or Lesbian Adults
230(9)
Formation of Families
230(1)
Challenges to and About Families Headed by Gays and Lesbians
231(2)
Challenges to Men Who Are Both Gay and Fathers
233(2)
Challenges to Women Who Are Both Lesbian and Mothers
235(2)
Children of Gay and Lesbian Parents
237(2)
Implications for Teachers Working with Children with Gay and Lesbian Parents
239(8)
PART III Evaluating Family-School Processes and Speaking Up for Children 247(80)
Assessing and Evaluating Parent-School Involvement
249(48)
Rationable for Assessment and Evaluation
250(3)
Developmentally Appropriate Assessment
253(2)
Definitions of Assessment and Evaluation
255(3)
Objectives-Oriented Evaluation Approach
256(1)
Formative and Summative Evaluation
257(1)
Needs, Authentic, and Portfolio Assessment
258(15)
Needs Assessment Strategies
258(2)
Authentic Assessment Strategies
260(6)
Authentic Assessment with Parents and Families
266(7)
Portfolio Assessment Strategies
273(7)
Definitions and Rationale
273(2)
Contexts and Uses of Portfolios with Parents and Families
275(1)
Determining Portfolio Effectiveness
276(4)
Program Evaluation Strategies for Early Childhood Teachers
280(9)
Definitions and Purposes of Program Evaluation
280(3)
Terminology Used in Evaluation
283(1)
Objective and Subjective Program Evaluation
283(2)
Naturalistic, Participant-Oriented Program Evaluation
285(2)
The Responsive Evaluation Model
287(1)
Consumer-Oriented Evaluation Approach
287(2)
Recommended Assessment and Evaluation Resources for Teachers and Parents
289(8)
Parent and Child Advocacy
297(30)
Child and Family Advocacy: Definitions and History
299(7)
Definitions
300(1)
Barriers to Advocacy Efforts
300(2)
History
302(3)
Changing Definition of the Child
305(1)
Effective Advocacy Strategies for Parents and Teachers
306(6)
Parent Interest Groups
307(1)
Parent-Organized Advocacy or Activist Groups
308(2)
Reggio Emilia-Inspired Project Groups
310(2)
School-Based PTA or PTO Groups
312(1)
Examples of successful Advocacy Initiatives
312(2)
Role of the School in Child and Family Advocacy
314(3)
Role of Collaboration in Child and Family Policy
317(10)
Suggestions for Collaborating with Parents
319(8)
Index 327(13)
About the Authors 340

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