The Bureau and the Mole: The Unmasking of Robert Philip Hanssen, the Most Dangerous Double Agent in FBI History

The Bureau and the Mole: The Unmasking of Robert Philip Hanssen, the Most Dangerous Double Agent in FBI History

by David A. Vise
3.8 13

Hardcover

$25.00
View All Available Formats & Editions

Temporarily Out of Stock Online

Eligible for FREE SHIPPING

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

The Bureau and the Mole: The Unmasking of Robert Philip Hanssen, the Most Dangerous Double Agent in FBI History 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I happened to read 'The Bureau and the Mole', by David A. Vise just after reading 'Last Man Standing', by David Baldacci. Rarely do you find that the truth is better and more entertaining than fiction. However, in this case Vise proves that the truth is WAY better than fiction. Hanssen the FBI agent, family man, devout Catholic, spy, pornmonger and traitor, shows that things are not always as they seem. The reader is treated to psychological insights, photos, KGB letters, and sexual fantasies of the most damaging person in US espionage history. Vise, a reporter by trade, truely delivers on this one. A great read!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I went on vacation in August, and as always, I need a good book to read wherever I am. This was no exception. The Bureau and the Mole was a non-stop thriller, and kudos to the author...I only wished it took the reader deeper into the thoughts of this very intelligent super-spy, Robert Hanssen. There is one question that kept popping in my head as I read this book, 'how many other 'Hanssens' are out there?' Washington DC is littered with bureaucrats trying to get ahead by cheating the country's honor. I have never admired such an outstanding per son as I have in Louis Freeh. He deserved more credit than he got while serving as the Director of the FBI...I wish more leaders like he had the integrity, honesty, and moral character that he possesses. I would love to write to Mr. Freeh and tell him how wonderful he is. Anybody out there know if he accepts emails? I have read another book, 'WITSEC' and Mr. Freeh was mentioned in that reading too, and I have nothing but just great admiration for him. So, Mr. Vise, the author of the book, and Mr. Freeh, keep fighting for your beliefs and keep writing about them, because, it's people like you that are America's true heroes! Thank-you.
Guest More than 1 year ago
this book just captured me i could not bring myself to put it down a wonderful cross between true crime/mafia and how the government works/fails us at times. It is a must read if you like knowing what the government thinks we should not
Guest More than 1 year ago
This fascinating tale would not be believed if it were fiction. The smoldering evil of Robert Hanssen is juxtaposed with the dogged endurance of FBI head Louis Freeh. My respect for Freeh has grown enormously, and my contempt for Hanssen knows no bounds. His traitorous acts deserve the ultimate punishment. This fascinating book robbed me of sleep; first to finish its gripping tale, and later as I pondered that such evil can live undetected in our midst. My gratitude to Freeh for devotion to his country, and my thanks to Vise for a riveting book.
board More than 1 year ago
This book is at least as much about the FBI and its erstwhile director Louis Freeh, if not more so, than the spy* Robert Hanssen. (*Despite the author’s continuing misuse of the term “double agent,” that’s not what Hanssen was; he was a spy.) The discussion about Freeh and the Bureau was interesting, but except for the agency’s missteps in dealing with the spy in its ranks, it was not particularly germane to the ostensible subject of the book. Regarding Hanssen himself, the reader learns about his upbringing, background, and full salacious details of his sexual fantasies and proclivities, but I never felt I had a clear understanding of why he decided to betray his country and so many of the principles that he seemed to hold. Even more disappointing to me as a student of Soviet espionage and counterespionage in general was the almost total lack of information about why he came under suspicion and how he was finally unmasked.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Reading the whole book, I found this to be an excellent rendition of the Hanssen story. The facts are in line with other books I've read on the Hanssen case and "Bureau..." adds details from the FBI side as well. Allen Weinstein, who helped unmask Soviet spy Alger Hiss, praised this book. That's quite a recommendation.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
It was good in the beginning how Vise told the history of Hanssen growing up and then how Freeh is tried in with Hassen, but then all of sudden Hassen is caught,Vise doesn't explain that is done and this the weak point in the book.So this how I come to my conclution
Guest More than 1 year ago
After reading the chapter provided, I found this book to be nothing more than 'poor little me' and wouldn't read the rest of it if it were free. (Unfortunately zero stars was not an option.) If I hear of any more people blaming their wrongdoings on their childhood and not taking responsibility, I think I will puke without ceasing for the rest of my life!