Burned Child Seeks the Fire: A Memoir

Burned Child Seeks the Fire: A Memoir

Hardcover(Reprint)

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Overview

The powerful story of a young girl, half-Jewish and raised Catholic in prewar Berlin, who descends into the underworld of Auschwitz while her mother remains behind.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780807070949
Publisher: Beacon
Publication date: 07/30/1997
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 105
Product dimensions: 5.80(w) x 8.81(h) x 0.70(d)

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Burned Child Seeks the Fire 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
meggyweg on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This Holocaust memoir is written differently from any other I've read. It's not in chronological order and a lot of times what's going on isn't really clear. It's a series of images, some of them foggy, some of them mixed up, from the author's childhood and adolescence. It's much more literary than a lot of Holocaust memoirs. Edvardson's mother was a novelist and according to the dust jacket, she herself has written other books.Cordelia Edvardson was the illegitimate daughter of a married Jewish man and a half-Jewish mother. She never knew her father, but she had an Aryan stepfather and was raised Catholic. To protect her from the Nazis her mother had her adopted by some Spanish people so she could get a Spanish passport and be exempt from deportation, but eventually the ruse was discovered and, at fourteen or so, Cordelia was sent first to Theresienstadt and then to Auschwitz. There she worked as a kind of secretary for Josef Mengele. After the war she moved to Sweden and married, then converted to Judaism and moved to Israel, where she lives today.I would recommend this book to people who have read a lot about the Holocaust, but not to neophytes on the subject. People who don't already know what Cordelia's talking about will probably be confused and irritated by her vagueness. But I found it intriguing.