By Divine Right (The Darkwater Saga): A Novella

By Divine Right (The Darkwater Saga): A Novella

by Patrick W. Carr

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781441265333
Publisher: Baker Publishing Group
Publication date: 09/01/2015
Series: Darkwater Saga
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 128
Sales rank: 63,852
File size: 3 MB

About the Author

Patrick W. Carr is the author of the acclaimed fantasy series The Staff and the Sword. A Cast of Stones won the 2014 Carol Award for Speculative Fiction and the 2014 Clive Staples Award. A Cast of Stones and The Hero's Lot were both finalists for 2014 Christy Awards. He teaches high school math and makes his home in Nashville, Tennessee, with his incredible wife, Mary, and their four sons. Learn more at www.patrickwcarr.com.
Patrick W. Carr is the author of the acclaimed fantasy series The Staff and the Sword. A Cast of Stones won the 2014 Carol Award for Speculative Fiction and the 2014 Clive Staples Award. A Cast of Stones and The Hero's Lot were both finalists for 2014 Christy Awards. He teaches high school math and makes his home in Nashville, Tennessee, with his incredible wife, Mary, and their four sons. Learn more at www.patrickwcarr.com.

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By Divine Right (The Darkwater Saga): A Novella 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Excellent intro to the Darkwater saga!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
annelr More than 1 year ago
By Divine Right, an e-novella by Patrick W. Carr, though short is compelling. War has scarred the people of the medieval kingdom of Collum. Not the least of these is Willet Dura, the king's reeve--a priest by dream and yet a soldier by destiny. With his somewhat supernatural talent of knowing deaths may not be natural, Dura sets out to find out why two of the kingdom's gifted ones have been murdered. Who is stealing their gifts? Why? Is a noble trying to duplicate the Aer given giftings of the king in order to take over the kingdom? Will Dura be timely with his discoveries and warnings? In this short tale, Carr brings suspense and intrigue, drawing the reader into the story almost immediately and keeping interest throughout. The story seems to be the backdrop for The Darkwater Saga and I am looking forward to reading book #1 The Shock of Night.
Bookworm_Debbie More than 1 year ago
An intricately woven fantasy novella! This novella did a marvelous job of drawing me into the fantasy realm that Patrick has created. I’m captivated by the idea that there are individuals that are gifted and they have the ability to pass their gifting on to an heir before they die. I’m looking forward to seeing how this progresses in future books in this series. Willet is an absolutely fascinating character. He is able to read others and relate to people in different levels of society. I thoroughly enjoyed trying to understand him and his past. I know that there are going to be more facets revealed about him. It does take a little effort to try and understand the nuances of a totally different realm but this novella is well worth the effort.
Catlady3 More than 1 year ago
another great book....willing be read all of Patrick Carr's books....thank you for the adventure
JaneenIppolito More than 1 year ago
I fell in love with Patrick W. Carr’s writing when I read A Cast of Stones. That was an epic fantasy, with a quest mentality and an intriguing plot involving religion, nobility, and destiny. While I didn’t love the ending, Carr did an incredible job with world-building and story-telling, making the story rich and nuanced, if a little top-heavy with plots. By Divine Right, the intro novella to his new Darkwater Saga, dives into a fresh world with an equally gritty protagonist. Willet Dura is a thoroughly likable, grounded reeve with an enjoyable first-person narrative. He offers a classic underdog perspective, and Carr deftly ties in tantalizing elements of his backstory that give him depth, even in a novella. The world-building is spot-on. Carr weaves a new, quasi-Christian religion into the existing quasi-medieval setting, and makes every aspect relevant to the plot. I enjoyed the way he explored the gifted within the concept of both faith and politics, and I’m excited to see what he has in store in the full first novel, The Shock of Night. One downfall? The only female character. Now, this isn’t a book aimed at a female audience (although it hardly excludes them). Nevertheless, Lady Gael is presented as a mystery and a curiosity. She hints at intelligence, gives coy reactions, and clearly is on the right side, but she’s not even close to a developed character. Granted, it’s first person from Dura’s perspective, and narrow views are a weakness of first person. Still, I hope those teasing hints develop into more of an actual woman in the full-length book. Final Verdict: a great start to a medieval-style detective saga, with a solid first-person narrative, great writing, and world-building that is thoroughly relevant to the plot.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago