By Oak, Ash, & Thorn: Modern Celtic Shamanism

By Oak, Ash, & Thorn: Modern Celtic Shamanism

Paperback(1st ed)

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Overview

Take one part of the world's oldest spiritual system (shamanism), mix in one part of one of the world's most popular spiritual cultures (the Celts), and bring it up to date by blending in modern forms of shamanism. The result is one of the most amazing books you'll ever use, D. J. Conway's By Oak, Ash, & Thorn .

This book is filled with information that can start you on a lifetime of study, practice, and spirituality. First, you'll learn about ancient and modern forms of shamanism. You'll discover the secrets of the three shamanic worlds, and how you can travel through these mysterious realms. You'll be shown how to communicate and deal with the entities and allies you meet there. You'll also learn about the tools that a shaman uses.

The thing that makes this book unique is that it comes from the viewpoint of Celtic shamanism, and not some generalized form. As a result, the worlds are specifically Celtic in nature. The tools come from Celtic myth and lore. The fifty entities you meet are named and defined as the Faery Folk and their kin—from the Bean sidhe (banshee) to the Will o' the Wisp (a faery who appears at night in lonely places carrying a lantern to confuse travellers). Almost fifty more animal allies are listed and described. You will also learn the mysteries of the vision quest and how it applies and can be used by Celtic shamans.

Before starting your journey you will take a test to determine your strengths and weaknesses as a potential shaman.

Other topics include:

  • Shamanic Healing
  • Soul Retrieval
  • Shape-shifting
  • Invisibility
  • Divination with stones, the omen stick and the Ogam alphabet
  • Pathworking through the three shamanic worlds
  • Different forms of Celtic magic
  • Herbs

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781567181661
Publisher: Llewellyn Worldwide, LTD.
Publication date: 01/01/1994
Series: Celtic Wisdom Series
Edition description: 1st ed
Pages: 320
Sales rank: 518,183
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.90(d)

About the Author

A native of the Pacific Northwest, D.J. Conway (1939 - 2019) studied the occult fields for over 35 years. Her quest for knowledge covered Paganism, Wicca, New Age, and Eastern philosophies as well as history, the magical arts, mythology, and folklore. Conway wrote more than 20 nonfiction books, including Celtic Magic (Llewellyn), Dancing with Dragons (Llewellyn), Mystical Dragon Magic (Llewellyn), The Ancient Art of Faery Magick (10 Speed Press), and The Little Book of Candle Magic (10 Speed Press).

Read an Excerpt

When most people think of the spiritual path of the ancient Celts, they think of the Druids. But just as there are many groups of Christians with varying ideas today, should we not assume that there were other spiritual paths open to the Celts?

In By Oak, Ash, & Thorn, D. J. Conway reveals that there was, indeed, another system which was shamanic in nature. Then she updates this ancient system with many of the modern techniques of shamanism to present a system that is usable today but goes back thousands of years: Celtic Shamanism.

This book shares a complete system with you. It begins by describing many aspects of shamanism, but with a Celtic spin to them. You will be amazed at how you see all of the shamanic references in the ancient Celtic texts. You will also discover the tools you need for Celtic Shamanism and learn that they come directly from ancient sources. And of course, you'll learn how to make use of them today.

Divination? You'll learn several Celtic techniques, including working with the ancient Ogam Runes. Shamanic Vision Quests? The book explains how to take Celtic ones. Journeying through the Shamanic otherworlds? It's in the book within a Celtic context. Magic? Of course! Secrets of herbs? They're in here. Healing? Instructions are included. Shamanic soul retrieval? In this book you'll find out how.

I really like this book's honesty. This is not ancient shamanism. Much of ancient shamanism wouldn't apply to us today. Rather it draws upon the ancient Celtic shamanism and combines it with some of the latest interpretation of shamanic beliefs and techniques. The result is a book that is fresh and meaningful.

One of the great things about this book, besides showing an entirely new — yet ancient — Celtic path, is that it shows how the ancient systems can be infused with life and value for today. This is a book you are going to read many times.

Table of Contents

When most people think of the spiritual path of the ancient Celts, they think of the Druids. But just as there are many groups of Christians with varying ideas today, should we not assume that there were other spiritual paths open to the Celts?

In By Oak, Ash, & Thorn, D. J. Conway reveals that there was, indeed, another system which was shamanic in nature. Then she updates this ancient system with many of the modern techniques of shamanism to present a system that is usable today but goes back thousands of years: Celtic Shamanism.

This book shares a complete system with you. It begins by describing many aspects of shamanism, but with a Celtic spin to them. You will be amazed at how you see all of the shamanic references in the ancient Celtic texts. You will also discover the tools you need for Celtic Shamanism and learn that they come directly from ancient sources. And of course, you'll learn how to make use of them today.

Divination? You'll learn several Celtic techniques, including working with the ancient Ogam Runes. Shamanic Vision Quests? The book explains how to take Celtic ones. Journeying through the Shamanic otherworlds? It's in the book within a Celtic context. Magic? Of course! Secrets of herbs? They're in here. Healing? Instructions are included. Shamanic soul retrieval? In this book you'll find out how.

I really like this book's honesty. This is not ancient shamanism. Much of ancient shamanism wouldn't apply to us today. Rather it draws upon the ancient Celtic shamanism and combines it with some of the latest interpretation of shamanic beliefs and techniques. The result is a book that is fresh and meaningful.

One of the great things about this book, besides showing an entirely new — yet ancient — Celtic path, is that it shows how the ancient systems can be infused with life and value for today. This is a book you are going to read many times.

Interviews

When most people think of the spiritual path of the ancient Celts, they think of the Druids. But just as there are many groups of Christians with varying ideas today, should we not assume that there were other spiritual paths open to the Celts?

In By Oak, Ash, & Thorn, D. J. Conway reveals that there was, indeed, another system which was shamanic in nature. Then she updates this ancient system with many of the modern techniques of shamanism to present a system that is usable today but goes back thousands of years: Celtic Shamanism.

This book shares a complete system with you. It begins by describing many aspects of shamanism, but with a Celtic spin to them. You will be amazed at how you see all of the shamanic references in the ancient Celtic texts. You will also discover the tools you need for Celtic Shamanism and learn that they come directly from ancient sources. And of course, you'll learn how to make use of them today.

Divination? You'll learn several Celtic techniques, including working with the ancient Ogam Runes. Shamanic Vision Quests? The book explains how to take Celtic ones. Journeying through the Shamanic otherworlds? It's in the book within a Celtic context. Magic? Of course! Secrets of herbs? They're in here. Healing? Instructions are included. Shamanic soul retrieval? In this book you'll find out how.

I really like this book's honesty. This is not ancient shamanism. Much of ancient shamanism wouldn't apply to us today. Rather it draws upon the ancient Celtic shamanism and combines it with some of the latest interpretation of shamanic beliefs and techniques. The result is a book that is fresh and meaningful.

One of the great things about this book, besides showing an entirely new — yet ancient — Celtic path, is that it shows how the ancient systems can be infused with life and value for today. This is a book you are going to read many times.

Customer Reviews

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By Oak, Ash, & Thorn: Modern Celtic Shamanism 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
kaelirenee on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Steps for guided meditations and for understanding the Celtic traditions within Wicca. Lots of appendices in the back for reference (excellent to help with meditation or dreams and spellcraft).
irishkitsune on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This was an excellent insight into modernizing the practices of ancient Celtic shamanism. Conway's writing is to-the-point and thorough with every respect to her subject. Much of the book is focused on the subject of vision questing and merging shamanism with other practices and faiths.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
D.J. Conway may know something about Core Shamanism--the guided meditations are actually pretty good--and she may have read Celtic literature, but she appears to know nothing about Celtic history and culture. Her disparaging remarks about St. Patrick and early Christianity are gratuitous and frequently wrong. Just 19 pages into the book, she writes, 'Although ancient Roman writers told of the Druidic passion for memorizing vast amounts of genealogy, history, and spiritual knowledge, it seems at some time the Celts did record some of their beliefs and history in writing. We are extremely fortunate that some of these manuscripts survived the burning purges of the Christians. Although it is said that that the Celts kept no written records, St. Patrick personally burned almost 180 Irish books written in the Celtic language.' In fact, every creditable historian I've read agrees that the Celts were pre-literate. We have a few memorial inscriptions in Ogham which seems to have been invented shortly before the Christian era, and some merchants's trade records--which might have written in Greek. We have not only Celtic myths and legends but works of the Greek philosophers because Irish monks collected, copied, and preserved them. Many books, however, were burned by Pagan Vikings between 800-1000 CE. NOWHERE could I find a reference to St. Patrick burning books--not even heretical Christian books, a possibility I would have accepted. This tidbit of information comes from Lewis Spence of Altantis fame. In the early 20th Century he also wrote a couple of books on Celtic mythology. Under no circumstances would I consider him a reliable source... I have no respect for Conway's shabby research. There are better books on shamanism available. I won't waste money on another Conway book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I won't pretend to be an expert on the subject (shamanism) but the book did seem a bit too 'mechanical'. In other words, gave too many lists of precise actions to follow and presented a type of cookbook approach which I felt was a bit too constrained for such a dynamic and individualized practice. For me, the 'how to' discussion style: 1) do this 2) turn to your left 3) talk to this being 4) if the being says this, then do this....did not invite one to experience the otherworlds in a free-flowing manner which I find more appropriate. Also I think the author could have done a much better job of explaining what exactly 'celtic' means. In the book it is clear that the author is focusing on the extreme western part of Europe (namely the british isles) - while celtic tribes were found as far east as helvetia (modern day Switzerland). I dislike this aspect of the book because it feeds the 'celtic frenzy' wherein anything with 'irish' or 'celtic' in its name/title sells like hotcakes...whether or not it is historically correct. All in all, a good primer for learning more about shamanism in general.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I enjoy the way she writes her books, they have almost like a hidden meaning. But anyway, you should check it out.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Although I could've done without the unnecessary Christian-bashing in the introduction, and although Llewellyn desperately needs better editors, this book is definately worth the read. The author presents some very useful info on basic shamanic techniques, as well as several helpful exercises - but be forewarned, that much of the cultural information provided on Celts and Celtic culture is up to speculation and debate, as the Celts were not a monolithic people.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I must agree with some reviews that i have read. This book is either love or hate. I happened to of loved the book. Not only does the authour help the reader start off their path of shamanism. She gives a background and several reverances to her reasons for her writings. She gives bits and pieces of celtic lore and legend. At first I didn't like it but towards the end it helped alot. This book is very good for those of us looking for celtic shamanism or just plain old shamanism. I must say though this is not a read and become book it is a read learn trial and error then become book. As an aspiring shaman take my advice the best teacher is yourself and nature.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Although I am an Odinist I do study both the celtic and teutonic folklore and history, and I found this to be a very good book, because the reality that the Northern Europeans used more symbol using (runes/ogham) and shamanic (the teutons called it 'seithr) techniques and not the popular 'Ceromonial Magic' (used by Wiccans and Hermetics)has come into play. For those of you looking for a good book on a genuine system of shamanism, this is a good book to get.