Bygones (Sommerfeld Trilogy Series #1)

Bygones (Sommerfeld Trilogy Series #1)

by Kim Vogel Sawyer
4.3 12

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Bygones (Sommerfeld Trilogy Series #1) 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful story of love, reconciliation & forgiveness, set in a Mennonite comunity in Kansas. I highly recommend it.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
I had the privilege of meeting Kim Vogel Sawyer in 2007 at the ACFW conference in Texas. She is a best selling author of both CBA & CBD. As a pre-published novel writer I was a little intimidated. Okay, who am I kidding? I was a lot intimidated. But I found Kim to be a very gracious, non-intimidating author. And I give the credit to the fact that she truly writes for God. The story has many threads, and the blurb on the back of the book and on Kim's website doesn't mention the thread that struck me the most. What touched me, was the thread about how much we need the love of our earthly father. I followed along with the bittersweet moments as some in the community embrace Marie, but her Father holds back his welcome. And her mother is a Godly wife who follows her husbands lead, even when it breaks her own heart. The conclusion to this thread was very healing for me.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I really liked this book. It was easy to read and I am anxiously waiting to read the second book in the series. I have never read this author before but I would gladly read another book that she would write.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Can I admit that this book sat on my shelf for six months. I wanted to read it, but I was afraid I would be unable to get into a story about the collision of old and new with the Mennonite thread. Yet from the moment I picked up this book till I finished it the next day, I could not get away from this story. The characters and plot were amazingly gripping. This book is real with characters that I could relate to. From Henry who has loved Marie for years, to her father whose stubbornness may undo him, to Beth who can¿t wait to get out of town. And the clash of Mennonite expectations with the 21st Century made me long for that simplicity ¿ though I do like my electricity, thank you very much. This is a book that will touch you long after you¿ve stopped reading it, whether you¿re the prodigal longing to come home or on the other side waiting to see if the prodigal is truly changed.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Does the speed we travel this journey of life leave you catching your breath? Sometimes we look with longing to the simple life and wish we could go back there. Kim Vogel Sawyer¿s book takes the reader on a journey into the life of an Old Order Mennonite family and Marie Koeppler¿s return to that life and faith. When she left home as a young widow with a small daughter she sought acceptance back into the family she left behind when she married. She found coldness and shunning. Now, twenty-three years later, she is in her hometown again,brought there by the wishes of her aunt Lisbeth. The news of her aunt¿s death and will of the house and family restaurant to Marie¿s daughter, Beth, is delivered by Marie¿s ex-beau, Henry Braun. Marie and Beth return to the Mennonite community of Sommerfield. As they try to settle into the slow pace of life in this community, a chain of mysterious thefts point to them, the `outsiders.¿ Marie finds herself drawn back into the faith of her childhood, the love of Henry Braun, and judged guilty, once again, by the same community she loves. Is there room in her life and theirs for forgiveness? The characters in this story are rich and real. Your heart is drawn into each one of them. You will even find yourself hoping the thief can be reformed. And the underlying theme of forgiveness is woven masterfully. Open the book and slow down to a life that is simpler, filled with grace and find a place n your heart where even you, like Marie, may need to can learn to let bygones be bygones. This book is a joy to read and I look forward to book two in the series.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an incredible book with finely drawn, believable characters you're just not ready to leave! Can't wait for the next in the trilogy!! A.K. Arenz
harstan More than 1 year ago
Over two decades ago her Mennoite family disowned Marie Koeppler when she married Jep Quinn, an outsider. She left Sommerfield, Kansas with her spouse knowing she will never see her parents again. She gave birth to Beth, became a widow and never returned she lives with her daughter in Cheyenne, Wyoming. When Aunt Lisbeth dies, she leaves her estate to Beth. However, for Beth to inherit the house and café, she must live in Sommerfield for three months. Though she expects a shunning even from her mother, who never claimed her granddaughter as kin, Marie and Beth agree to try it. However, just after they arrive in Sommerfield, thefts occur the locals blame Beth while Marie investigates to prove her daughter and her are innocent. Even Henry Braun, who came to Cheyenne to tell her Lisbeth died and whom loved Marie when she fled over twenty plus years ago, thinks either her and or her daughter are the thieves. Though she still owns his heart, he also refuses to allow BYGONES to move on as he fears she will break it again. --- Readers obtain a deep look at the modern day Mennonites in Kansas when a former resident returns home knowing she belongs there, but also assumes she will never be accepted as part of a community that condemned her for marrying an outsider. The cast brings to life this teriffic family drama as Marie and Beth try to do what is best for the other even sacrificng their own needs. The mystery and romance, though both well written and key elements of the deep story line, play supporting subplot roles to the prime theme of you apparently can¿t go home even to Mennonite Sommerfield once you have left. --- Harriet Klausner