Call of Earth (Homecoming Series #2)

Call of Earth (Homecoming Series #2)

by Orson Scott Card
4.2 24

Paperback(Mass Market Paperback - Revised)

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Overview

Call of Earth (Homecoming Series #2) by Orson Scott Card

As Harmony's Oversoul grows weaker, a great warrior has arisen to challenge its bans. His name is Moozh, and he has won control of an army using forbidden technology. Now he is aiming his soldiers at the city of Basilica, that strong fortress above the Plain.

Basilica remains in turmoil. Wetchik and his sons are not strong enough to stop a army. Can Rasa and her allies defeat him through intrigue, or will Moozh take the city and all who are in it?

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780812532616
Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates
Publication date: 01/28/1994
Series: Homecoming Saga Series , #2
Edition description: Revised
Pages: 352
Sales rank: 249,609
Product dimensions: 4.24(w) x 6.70(h) x 0.92(d)
Age Range: 14 - 18 Years

About the Author

Orson Scott Card is the author of the novels Ender's Game, Ender's Shadow, and Speaker for the Dead. Ender's Game and Speaker for the Dead both won Hugo and Nebula Awards, making Card the only author to win these two top prizes in consecutive years. There are seven other novels to date in The Ender Universe series. Card has also written fantasy: The Tales of Alvin Maker is a series of fantasy novels set in frontier America; his most recent novel, The Lost Gate, is a contemporary magical fantasy. Card has written many other stand-alone sf and fantasy novels, as well as movie tie-ins and games, and publishes an internet-based science fiction and fantasy magazine, Orson Scott Card's Intergalactic Medicine Show. Card was born in Washington and grew up in California, Arizona, and Utah. He served a mission for the LDS Church in Brazil in the early 1970s. Besides his writing, Card directs plays and teaches writing and literature at Southern Virginia University. He lives in Greensboro, North Carolina, with his wife, Kristine Allen Card, and youngest daughter, Zina Margaret.

Hometown:

Greensboro, North Carolina

Date of Birth:

August 24, 1951

Place of Birth:

Richland, Washington

Education:

B.A. in theater, Brigham Young University, 1975; M.A. in English, University of Utah, 1981

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The Call of Earth (Homecoming Series #2) 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 24 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Card builds an extensive & believable world as well as characters and situations with which i can identify. The crisies they face are well thought out and well developed. He along with modessit are my favorite writers.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Orson Scott Card in his science fiction novel the Call of the Earth, creates an intriguing world for a computer scientist as it details the way in which technology has evolved over a massive stretch of time. The story follows two empires, the Goranyi which is ruled by men and Bascilla who are ruled by women on the new planet Harmony that was settled in wake of the sequence of savage wars that destroyed earth. On this planet technology has evolved into something starkly different to what we have today, instead of our view of technology where we see it as a tool, the people of the story switch those roles and perform the will of technology. Both of the empires are aided by two incredibly advanced computers called the Oversoul and the Imperator which were installed by the original inhabitants of the planet. However these computers are drastically different from our modern definition of one, as they are not only sentient but have the ability to influence the minds of humans through electromagnetic waves. The purpose of these computers when they were created was to create a world in which their was no war or violence through computers directing malicious thoughts away from the minds of people. Essentially technology was fitted to suit the needs of these humans and in my opinion this is an entirely likely thing that could happen. The world is fairly believable which adds to the story in that it asks the question of could this really happen? Orson Scott Card’s world is one defined by the harmony between technology and humans which is likely to be what defines our society in the coming future.
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Here_Be_Bookwyrms More than 1 year ago
"...Overall, I like The Call of Earth much better than its predecessor, not only because the pacing of events is more to my liking, but because of the characters as well. There is much more of Luet in this book, as I was hoping. She was easily my favorite character, and she still is, though there is a lot of her older sister, the raveler Hushidh, in this one as well, and she's equally interesting to me...As for the ending, I liked how things wrap up. Card leaves off with enough tension to make me very curious about what happens next, but without it being an actual cliffhanger; we do get a resolution first to other events, and even though I ended up correctly guessing the outcome, I was still pretty satisfied with it..." For full review, please visit me at Here Be Bookwyrms on Blogger: herebebookwyrms dot blogspot dot com
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Michael_Wang More than 1 year ago
I was hooked on this series from the Memory of Earth and the Call of Earth is making it harder for me to stop reading this series. I love how Orson Scott Card writes and how the story just draws me in. I feel that he has really made the characters grow in this book and can't wait to see how much they mature in the following books. The new addition of General Moozh is an exciting twist to this story since he can also hear the Oversoul. However, this book had less action then The Memory of Earth and to some readers it might seem to get off to a slow start. But, despite that I could not put this book done until the end. If you liked The Memory of Earth then you must read this book.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
this book is possibly the best in the Homecoming series. the book's assortment of characters are ingeniously tied together by dreams, calling them to earth. orson scott card has an amazing capacity to capture human emotions, and to illustrate the very fiber that holds humans together. he does this in this book, and in the other homecoming books, but this one is made the best by a truly unforgettable character, general Moozh an ambitious, resourceful, and clever leader, who becomes woven up in the book's net of character relationships, and, of course, dreams.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My husband and I have fallen in love with this series. I really feel like I know the characters,which is why I have to continue the series. I'm wrapped up in the characters and the story. I also really enjoy the theological questions woven in. You will truly enter into a new world when you read this book and the others from the series.
TooMuchTimeInNaples More than 1 year ago
This book picks up considerably in the storyline and action over the first in the series. OSC lays such an intricate family framework that it became a bit tedious to slog through. This book, the second in the series, builds on that framework and moves forward at a much faster pace. The series storyline was somewhat predictable but a very good read. Being a HUGE OSC fan, I didn't stop until I had finished them all back to back. I just today, discovered another book that belongs to the series, Earthborn. I will read that one after I finish Killing Kennedy, which is an excellent read, especially if you lived through some of the history of that time period. We knew that we were within hours of a nuclear exchange with the USSR. It is chilling to read it and relive it. TB