Call Someplace Paradise

Call Someplace Paradise

by Pat Hartman

NOOK Book(eBook)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781462812493
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
Publication date: 06/28/2000
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 799 KB

Table of Contents

Chapter 1July-September 19789
Chapter 2October-December 197830
Chapter 3January-March 197945
Chapter 4April-June 197954
Chapter 5July-September 197966
Chapter 6October-December 197983
Chapter 7January-March 198093
Chapter 8April-June 198098
Chapter 9July-September 1980115
Chapter 10October-December 1980129
Chapter 11January-March 1981141
Chapter 12April-June 1981153
Chapter 13July-September 1981163
Chapter 14October-December 1981169
Chapter 15January-March 1982182
Chapter 16April-June 1982195
Chapter 17July-September 1982207
Chapter 18October-December 1982221
Chapter 19January-March 1983230
Chapter 20April-June 1983233
Chapter 21July-September 1983240
Chapter 22October-December 1983246
Chapter 23January-March 1984253
Chapter 24April-June 1984261
Chapter 25July-October 1984267

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Call Someplace Paradise 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She moves past him and into another room.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
He grips her hips, fu<_>cking her harder.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Pat Hartman is probably the most underrated journalist in America. Her style is eloquent, her vocabulary enormous, and her razor-sharp wit carves startling insights out of ordinary events. There is nothing ordinary, however, about this chronicle of six years in Venice Beach. This book is a time capsule spanning America's transition from unchecked freedom to ugly conservatism. If you're looking for character studies for a novel, you'll find hundreds of them: transgender rollerskaters, cutthroat comedians, heartbreakingly homeless bag ladies, and a spleef of hippies slipping past their prime. Timothy Leary's best (and worst) acid trips pale by comparison. One caveat: Pat Hartman's greatest work is yet to come. This book is full intense bursts of immaculate writing. I can't wait to see her stretch out. Get a first edition of this book so you can tell your kids you were into Pat Hartman *before* she won the Pulitzer (and so you can tell them what the late '70s were like -- since you probably can't remember).
Guest More than 1 year ago
Pat Hartman is probably the most underrated journalist in America. Her style is eloquent, her vocabulary enormous, and her razor-sharp wit carves startling insights out of ordinary events. There is nothing ordinary, however, about this chronicle of six years in Venice Beach. This book is a time capsule spanning America's transition from unchecked freedom to ugly conservatism. If you're looking for character studies for a novel, you'll find hundreds of them: transgender rollerskaters, cutthroat comedians, heartbreakingly homeless bag ladies, and a spleef of hippies slipping past their prime. Timothy Leary's best (and worst) acid trips pale by comparison. One caveat: Pat Hartman's greatest work is yet to come. This book is full intense bursts of immaculate writing. I can't wait to see her stretch out. Get a first edition of this book so you can tell your kids you were into Pat Hartman *before* she won the Pulitzer (and so you can tell them what the late '70s were like -- since you probably can't remember).