Calling Invisible Women

Calling Invisible Women

by Jeanne Ray
4.1 39

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Calling Invisible Women: A Novel 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 39 reviews.
cloggiedownunder More than 1 year ago
Calling Invisible Women is the fifth novel by American author, Jeanne Ray. Like many women in their fifties holding down jobs and looking after families, Clover Hobart has often felt like she’s invisible. Then, one day she wakes up to find she actually is. Invisible. However, no-one seems to notice; not her paediatrician husband, Arthur, not her adult children, Nick and Evie. In fact, only her best friend Gilda actually realises something is wrong. But quite by accident, Clover discovers other women with her predicament, and learns how this has happened. This insightful novel is about perception and self-image; about perspective and being brave and jumping back into life; about workplace discrimination; about multi-national drug companies and cover-ups; about supporting each other and deciding to fight like Goliath even when you are David. Ray touches on health kicks and magic bullets and boarding planes. I expect sales of Rive Gauche may well increase thanks to Ray’s latest perceptive, thought-provoking and laugh-out-loud funny offering.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a great metaphor for any woman who has felt invisible at some point in time or some place in space. But anyone who has ever wanted to be invisible will relate to Clover. Going with her on her journey is discomfiting and fun in the same instant. And discovering how those around her come to grips with their hopes leaves the reader mighty satisfied.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Quite possibly one of the best books I've read in months!  What would you do if suddenly you woke one morning to discover you were invisible.  Not metaphorically.  Physically invisible.  Your family, friends, neighbors, and co-workers couldn't see you anymore.  Clover faces this situation with courage and pluck, meeting with a group of other local women who were also invisible.  And together they launched an investigation into the cause of their plight.  As the story progresses, answers are found, friendships are forged, and invisibility becomes a power more than a disability.  In invisibility comes a bravery many of the women may not have possessed otherwise, and together they waged a battle against the pharmaceutical company that was at fault for their condition.  While the story does not wrap its conclusion with a neat bow, tying up all loose ends, it is satisfying.  An outstanding read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I picked this book as part of my commitment to the Oprah facebook site, and I was not disappointed by it. It's a fun story about unintended medical side effects, and I think most housewives would agree that there are times when we feel invisible, too. It might make a good book for a book club discussion, too. I enjoyed it and will look for other books by this author.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The invisability is a metaphor for what REALLY happens to women in their 40s and 50s. We really do become invisible. Family, neighbors, coworkers, and society in general just look right through you like you you you're not there. If you're single, it's even worse, men our own ages look past us to oogle Susie Coed's T&A. Like Susie Coed wants your bald or grey heads, your beer guts, and your bad smells, humph!!! There are days I feel like Mindy, the Nationwide insurance lady, only if I went through the ice cream aisle at the market it would not be cute! And the guys on the basketball court would probaby call the cops like I'm mental! Older ladies, back me up here!!!
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taxbarbie More than 1 year ago
This book works on many levels. It's the kind of book that warrants a book club discussion. Yes, the premise of actual invisibility might be far-fetched, but it brings out so many questions about our seeming invisibility when we reach a certain age. The storyline about the unintended consequences of the medication causing actual invisibility just lends a way to offer some very humorous twists in the story. I've recommended this book to numerous friends. It's worth the read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
What a great writer! A new, fun way to approach women! Light reading that makes you smile.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
An imaginative, yet realistic read. I appreciate the LOL scenes the author created. It's a good balance between a "light read" and a book that touches on the issues of women who are middle-aged. Jeanne Ray continues to not disappoint.
MollyWeasley More than 1 year ago
Fun book to read. It's hard to find books about "women of a certain age" that doesn't involve romance, but shows tenacity and growth of an individual. Enjoyable and surprise ending.
TilliPhD More than 1 year ago
What a creative romp into the real life experience of women as we age! Ray shines a positive light onto the potential power of life's curve ball by reminding us to see or use the advantages. Women will delight in her humor and drive; men will delight in finding new ways to see women united in solidarity taking on their oppressors. MBD NY
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Quick and witty
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It was a funny read with a zanny premis that I couldn't believe could remain fresh for the entire story. A charmer.
DudleyS More than 1 year ago
I loved this quirky, silly, outlandish book! There is the serious theme of how over time, we as women, begin to feel invisible to those around us. We are simply the driver, shopper, cook, walker of dogs, etc.. We are too busy for deep friendship and even when we are with friends, it can feel superficial. The author touches on this in a very fictional way that has the reader nodding and laughing all at the same time. I highly recommend this book...just be sure to clear your mind of any need for this to be plausible. Enjoy it for the fun story that it is.
Di-DiDL More than 1 year ago
This humorous, yet poignant story about a woman becoming invisible makes you first wonder whether it's her imagination or whether it's real. While examining the typical middle-age crisis that many women face, the story also takes a literal bend which oddly works. I recommend this especially to women who once felt visible to the world, but now through aging and losing youthful appeal, have found that not only they have disappeared in other's eyes, but have disappeared in their own as well. A sweet and I think, fast read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed it. I am a 30 something wife and mother and yet can definitely relate! Yes, it requires some degree of "suspension of disbelief", but it's fiction folks!