×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Casualty Gap: The Causes and Consequences of American Wartime Inequalities
     

The Casualty Gap: The Causes and Consequences of American Wartime Inequalities

by Douglas L. Kriner, Francis X. Shen
 

See All Formats & Editions

The Casualty Gap shows how the most important cost of American military campaigns--the loss of human life--has been paid disproportionately by poorer and less-educated communities since the 1950s. Drawing on a rich array of evidence, including National Archives data on the hometowns of more than 400,000 American soldiers killed in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, and

Overview

The Casualty Gap shows how the most important cost of American military campaigns--the loss of human life--has been paid disproportionately by poorer and less-educated communities since the 1950s. Drawing on a rich array of evidence, including National Archives data on the hometowns of more than 400,000 American soldiers killed in World War II, Korea, Vietnam, and Iraq, this book is the most ambitious inquiry to date into the distribution of American wartime casualties across the nation, the forces causing such inequalities to emerge, and their consequences for politics and democratic governance.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Commendable."—The Nation

"The Casualty Gap's thoughtful analyses and arguments not only break down the larger statistical picture, but reveal how single communities respond to news of their own soldiers dying. Most disturbing is the clear pattern of civic and political disengagement in communities bearing the greatest sacrifices and most in need of increasingly unpopular government assistance."—Michigan War Studies Review

"An important book...Shen and Kriner are especially innovative in using multiple sources of evidence and methods to connect participation in recent wards to political participation at home. Summing Up: Recommended."—CHOICE

"Provocative and intriguing."—John Mueller, Professor of Political Science, The Ohio State University, and author of Atomic Obsession

"This inventive and deeply troubling book teaches that our volunteer military allocates the ultimate costs of war very unevenly, raising fundamental questions about distributive justice. Importantly, it also chronicles the effects of exposure to these costs, and isolation from them, on mass opinion, trust in government, and levels of political engagement, thus offering a significant contribution to understanding vexing trends in mass attitudes and political behavior."—Ira Katznelson, Ruggles Professor of Political Science and History, Columbia University, and former president of the American Political Science Association

"Deep into wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, the U.S. national media is devoting increasing amounts of coverage to the variable costs of war. It is a rare piece of scholarship that tackles a highly politicized issue—this one, in fact, sizzles—but remains balances, fair, and informative. this book is just loaded with fresh empirical insights. For the comprehensiveness of its data and the variety of its empirical resesarch methods, Kriner and Shen's book will quickly establish itself as the leading academic treatment of the topic."—William G. Howell, Sydney Stein Professor in American Politics, University of Chicago

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780195390964
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
04/28/2010
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Douglas L. Kriner is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Boston University.

Francis X. Shen is Fellow, MacArthur Foundation Law & Neuroscience Project.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews