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CCNA Routing and Switching Exam Cram: Master the Fundamentals of Cisco Routers and Switches
     

CCNA Routing and Switching Exam Cram: Master the Fundamentals of Cisco Routers and Switches

by Jeffrey T. Coe, Matthew Rees
 
Covers the installation, configuration, and operation of simple-routed LAN, WAN, and switched LAN networks. Discusses remote access and integrating dial-up connectivity with traditional, remote LAN to LAN access, as well as supporting the high levels of performance required for new applications such as Internet commerce and multimedia. Demonstrates ways to optimize

Overview

Covers the installation, configuration, and operation of simple-routed LAN, WAN, and switched LAN networks. Discusses remote access and integrating dial-up connectivity with traditional, remote LAN to LAN access, as well as supporting the high levels of performance required for new applications such as Internet commerce and multimedia. Demonstrates ways to optimize WAN through Internet solutions that reduce bandwidth and WAN cost.

Editorial Reviews

bn.com
The authors provide practical, to-the-point exam prep for Cisco's latest CCNA routing and switching exam (640-507). Walk through installing, configuring, and running routed LANs and WANs, as well as switched LAN networks; review Access Lists, Bandwidth on Demand (BOD), and Dial on Demand Routing (DDR); implement remote access; support high-performance e-commerce and multimedia applications; optimize your network; and much more.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781576106280
Publisher:
Coriolis Group
Publication date:
06/28/2000
Series:
Exam Cram 2 Series
Edition description:
2ND
Pages:
400
Product dimensions:
6.06(w) x 9.02(h) x 1.02(d)

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1: Cisco Career Certification Exams

Exam taking is not something that most people anticipate eagerly, no matter how well prepared they are. In most cases, familiarity helps ameliorate test anxiety. In plain English, this means that you will probably not be as nervous when you take your fourth or fifth Cisco certification exam as when you take your first. Whether it is your first exam or your tenth, understanding the details of exam taking (how much time to spend on questions, the environment you will be in, and so on) and the exam software will help you to concentrate on the material, rather than on the setting. Likewise, mastering a few basic exam-taking skills should help you to recognize-and perhaps even outfox-some of the tricks and gotchas you are bound to find in some of the exam questions.

This chapter, besides explaining the exam environment and software, describes some proven exam-taking strategies that you can use to your advantage.

The Exam Situation

When you arrive at the exam testing center, you must sign in with an exam coordinator and show two forms of identification, one of which must be a photo ID. After you have signed in and your time slot arrives, you will be asked to deposit any books, bags, or other items you brought with you. Then, you will be escorted into a closed room. Typically, the room will be furnished with one to half a dozen computers, and each workstation will be separated from the others by dividers designed to keep you from seeing what is happening on someone else's computer. You will be furnished with a pen or pencil and a blank sheet of paper, or, in some cases, an erasable plastic sheet and an erasable felt-tippen. You are allowed to write any information you want on both sides of this sheet. Before the exam, memorize as much of the material that appears on the Cram Sheet (inside the front cover of this book) as you can and write that information on the blank sheet as soon as you are seated in front of the computer. You can refer to your rendition of the Cram Sheet anytime you like during the test, but you will have to surrender the sheet when you leave the room.

Most test rooms feature a wall with a large picture window. This permits the exam coordinator standing behind it to monitor the room, to prevent exam takers from talking to one another, and to observe anything out of the ordinary that might happen. The exam coordinator will have preloaded the appropriate Cisco certification 'on exam-for this book, that's Exam 640-507-and you will be per certification matted to start as soon as you are seated in front of the computer. All Cisco certification exams allow a certain maximum amount of time in which to complete the work (this time is indicated on the exam by an on-screen counter/ clock, so you can check the time remaining whenever you like). Exam 640-507 consists of 65 randomly selected questions. You may take up to 75 minutes to complete the exam. To pass, you are required to achieve a score of 822 or better on a scale of 300 to 1,000.

All Cisco certification exams are computer-generated and use a multiple-choice format. From time to time, you may be prompted to enter actual configuration commands as if you were at the command-line interface. It is important not to abbreviate the commands in anyway when this type of question is posed. Although this may sound quite simple, the questions are constructed not only to check your mastery of basic facts and figures about Cisco router configuration, but also to require you to evaluate one or more sets of circumstances or requirements. Often, you will be asked to give more than one answer to a question. Likewise, you might be asked to select the best or most effective solution to a problem from a range of choices, all of which are technically correct. Taking the exam is quite an adventure, and it involves real thinking. This book shows you what to expect and how to deal with the potential problems, puzzles, and predicaments.

Exam Layout and Design

Some exam questions require you to select a single answer, whereas others ask you to select multiple correct answers. The following multiple-choice question requires you to select a single correct answer. Following the question is a brief summary of each potential answer and why it is either right or wrong.

Answer b is correct. The destination network layer, or layer 3, address is the protocol-specific address to which this piece of data is to be delivered. The source network layer address is the originating host and plays no role in getting the information to the destination; therefore, answer a is incorrect. The source and destination MAC addresses are necessary for getting the data to the router or to the next hop address, but they are not used in pathing decisions; therefore, answers c and d are incorrect...

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