Chase

Chase

by Jessie Haas
3.2 6

NOOK Book(eBook)

$6.99
View All Available Formats & Editions
Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
Want a NOOK ? Explore Now

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Chase 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The setting is after the civil war period. A boy is at place that he shouldn't be. He is a witness to a murder and it is immediately decided that he had to be 'taking care of'. The murder aims the gun directly at the boys head, with his finger on the trigger and BAM! He decides that the kid could be framed instead of killed. I guess this killer has a heart. The storyline was okay. The first couple of pages were really slow . It wasn't until page 15-20 that I became interested. So in the beginning, I was debating on whether I wanted to keep reading or stop. It was worth it though. I would give this book a rating of 3.5, because after the book and the story did start and made me want to keep reading. I could sort of predicted some things, but at the same time it wasn't that predictable. I've read books that were so predictable, you could literally guess the whole entire story. A huge waste of time. The were many time that i was shocked at what happen. Especially when he fell in the hole . If you like action, mystery, crime, or suspense. I would defiantly suggest or recommend this book to you. You just have to give it a chance and get into the book, because if you judge it off of the first few minutes you will quickly set the book back down. Along with the action and mystery, there is a sense of realism in the book. Its pretty realistic. At first i was sure he was just going to leave town immediately, but in real life if your being tracked. Leaving that quick is not an option.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Who wants to write a book about a horse running away from a murderer. Iam upset with jessie hass in this book , but if you want a good book by jessie read saige.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
THIS IS A CHINDRENS BOOK. Lets not be gross
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Chase," by Jessie Haas, disappoints by perpetuating anti-labor and anti-Irish myths: e.g., saying the Molly Maguires and a respectable Irish society--the Ancient Order of Hibernians--are identical. That assertion is traceable to mine owners and their associates. Owners repeated slanders and unfounded accusations to stoke anti-labor feeling and fear in the coalfields. Many innocent workers were jailed, harassed, killed, framed, throughout the United States by such tactics. To preempt and dodge historical criticism, Haas writes in the afterward (p. 246 ff.) that charges ranging from murder to mayhem against Irish miners may have been based on mine owner "propaganda." "Or they may be true," but "remain impossible to prove" "because of the group's secrecy" --begging the question of the existence of the Molly Maguires, still disputed. Haas bases a book, aimed at students, on admittedly improvable assumptions. If Haas attempted to correct the record, some of this looseness with facts could be overlooked. For example, if she seriously disputed the veracity of the mine owners' Pinkerton agents, whose hearsay evidence, sometimes given in court against miners, is at least partially responsible for biased accounts passing as history. Haas says that "unfair" mine bosses "frequently" received hand-written death threats and "if the boss didn't leave, he was murdered." How does she know that? Only a small number of these notes have been found, and we have no direct proof of who wrote them. It was this sort of hearsay "evidence" that Clarence Darrow later destroyed in court, leading to acquittal of the accused in a case also involving Pinkerton detectives against union miners in the west. History shows the number bosses killed by coal miners was miniscule compared to miners killed or murdered in the anthracite region by mine owners. Haas' argument that the history of the anthracite region remains unclear is untrue. Scholarship, including oral histories, repeatedly shows that mine owners' actions were at the root of problems in the coalfields: hence Theodore Roosevelt's threat to J. P. Morgan of a federal takeover of coal mines if Morgan refused to negotiate with the union (see Anthracite Strike of 1902).