Child of a Rainless Year

Child of a Rainless Year

by Jane M. Lindskold
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Hardcover(First Edition)

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Overview

Child of a Rainless Year by Jane M. Lindskold

Middle-aged Mira Fenn knows she has an uncomfortably exotic past. As a small girl, she lived in a ornate old house in tiny Las Vegas, New Mexico, tended by oddly silent servant women and ruled by her coldly flamboyant mother Colette. When Mira was nine, Colette went on one of her unexplained trips, only this time she never returned.

Placed with foster parents, Mira was raised in Ohio, normal save for her passion for color. On gaining adulthood, she learned that she still owned the New Mexico house. She also learned that, as a condition of being allowed to adopt her, Mira's foster parents had agreed to change their name, move to another state, and never ask why.

Years later, going through family papers after the deaths of her elderly foster parents, Mira finds documents that pique her curiosity about her vanished mother and the reasons behind her strange childhood and adoption.

Travelling back to New Mexico, she finds the house is and isn't as she remembers it. Inside, it's much the same. Outside, it's been painted in innumerable colors. As Mira continues to investigate her mother's life, events take stranger and stranger turns. The silent women reappear. Even as Mira begins to suspect the power to which she may be heir, the house itself appears to be waking up...

Shot through with magic and the atmosphere of the Southwest, this singular fantasy novel has all the storytelling vigor of Jane Lindskold's very popular Firekeeper series.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780765309372
Publisher: Doherty, Tom Associates, LLC
Publication date: 05/01/2005
Edition description: First Edition
Pages: 400
Product dimensions: 6.70(w) x 9.04(h) x 1.30(d)

About the Author

Jane Lindskold lives in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Her Wolf novels include Through Wolf’s Eyes; Wolf’s Head, Wolf’s Heart; The Dragon of Despair; and Wolf Captured. Her other novels include The Buried Pyramid, Changer, and, with the late Roger Zelazny, Lord Demon and Donnerjack.

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Child of a Rainless Year 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
this book was really interesting . i absolutly loved it !
harstan More than 1 year ago
When Mira Fenn turned nine years old her mom Colette disappeared and the preadolescent moved to Ohio to be raised by foster parents there. Several decades later, when her adoptive parents die, Mira finds the deed that proves she owns the Las Vegas, New Mexico home that she originally lived in. Having no excuse to rationalize avoiding her past, Mira heads home to learn why Colette vanished without a trace. --- In Las Vegas, Mira feels at home in Phineas House with mirrors everywhere especially in odd places. She learns from the caretaker Domingo that the house has pleaded with him to colorfully paint it over; Mira agrees that the house needs vibrant pastorals. As they work in harmony restoring Phineas House, Mira and Domingo begin to understand the ancestral link between their families and the intelligence of the edifice that whispers colors to the artists. They also begin to learn what happened to Colette and more about each other, but will a growing fondness be enough to prevent family history from repeating? --- This is an interesting fantasy tale in which the mundane contains magic, depending on the color as varying shades have differing charms. The middle aged Mira is a solid protagonist while Domingo serves as a fine balance to her whose acceptance of magic is in her genetic make up to do so. The story line contains complex concepts of reality; however, too much remains unresolved so that the audience at the end of the day will feel blue having to wait for an apparent sequel.--- Harriet Klausner