Childhood Interrupted: Growing up in an industrial school

Childhood Interrupted: Growing up in an industrial school

by Kathleen O'Malley
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Overview

Childhood Interrupted: Growing up in an industrial school by Kathleen O'Malley

In 1950, Kathleen O'Malley and her two sisters were legally abducted from their mother and placed in an industrial school ran by the Sisters of Mercy order of nuns, who also ran the notorious Magdalene Homes. The rape of eight-year-old Kathleen by a neighbour had triggered their removal - the Irish authorities ruling that her mother must have been negligent. They were only allowed a strictly supervised visit once a year, until they were permitted to leave the harsh and cruel regime of the institution at the age of sixteen. But Kate survived her traumatic childhood and escaped her past by leaving for England and then Australia when the British government offered a scheme to encourage settlement there. Fleeing her past again, Kate worked as a governess in Paris and then returned to England where she trained as a beautician at Elizabeth Arden. She married and had a son. A turning point in Kate's life came when she applied to become a magistrate and realised that she had to confront her hidden personal history and make it public. This is her inspiring story.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780748132072
Publisher: Little, Brown Book Group
Publication date: 09/08/2011
Sold by: Hachette Digital, Inc.
Format: NOOK Book
Sales rank: 489,174
File size: 295 KB

About the Author

Kathleen O'Malley is a magistrate in Middlesex. She is married and has a son.

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Childhood Interrupted: Growing up in an industrial school 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The writer's honesty and willingness to share her experiences, both of her childhood and of how she is gradually coming to terms with her past, stands as a powerful testimony to how children suffer damage and how wounded souls can rise. I came to this memoir after seeing the film Philomena, and this certainly opens my eyes to the institutional abuse of children in poverty, in what had seemed "civilized" places.