Children of Dune

Children of Dune

by Frank Herbert
4.4 133

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Children of Dune 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 133 reviews.
bookwormTE More than 1 year ago
Children of dune is a great addition the Dune science fiction series. I really enjoyed reading this book. Leto II is my favorite character in the series after reading this. Children of dune is set 9 years after Dune messiah. Paul and chani's children are 9 years old and have certain memories that they maybe shouldn't about their parents and the past of planet arrakis. This is one of the best in the dune series. I highly recommend it to fans of the series and fans of science fiction in general. Frank Herbert has a unique and great writing style.
Anonymous 5 months ago
If you love Dune you can't miss this journey
Adam_Gentry More than 1 year ago
Power tempts us all. Once more an empire stands on the brink of revolution. Alia rules as regent, but without her brother’s gift of prescience she is forced to rely on more mundane methods to cling to power, while voices from the past return to oppose her. Elsewhere House Corrino sets their own plan in motion, preying on the discontent in a vain hope to reclaim their throne. And in the center of it all, Paul’s children, Leto and Ghani. As pre-born they came into the world fully aware, containing echoes of every ancestor, a multitude that they must overcome if they are to have any hope of undoing the fate forced upon mankind by their father’s prescience. A series of character vignettes ease audiences back into the familiar world of Dune, setting the stage for a complex web of political intrigue. Within each chapter details are carefully doled out, making a minor mystery of the context, before giving way to dialogue and monologue driven scenes. Audiences are challenged to read between the lines and make their own conclusions about the characters, who speak with many layers of meaning. At times the diverse plots can be a little daunting. Chapters rarely offer more than a scant reference to what’s come before. Instead they consistently plough ahead, engaging a variety of philosophical questions about the moral and utilitarian nature of existence, as well as the burdens of knowledge and duty. Alternating perspectives counterbalance the slow pacing of the narrative, and offer opposing views on the underlying issues. Characters are recognized as both sympathetic and callous, though gradually characters are cast as either villain or hero, paving the way for an ending that is satisfying, if a little anticlimactic, and leaves much unanswered. A strong waypoint that paves a new path for the rest of the series. +Strong Ideas +Strong, Complex Characters *Slow, dialogue driven plot *Challenging Writing *Regularly alternating between numerous perspectives 4/5
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
its DUNE
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The 3rd Novel in Frank Herbert’s Dune series, Children of Dune has all of the qualities the first novel has and more. As the story continues, the children of the Dune Messiah, Paul Muad’Dib, have very special minds that the entire universe wishes to manipulate into their own personal source of power. However, the children have their own plans for the future. All of them struggle to control the future and end up losing all control. If you are interested in Science Fiction, twisted plot lines, and awesome action then this book is something you should read. Herbert is a great writer and every one of his novels have impressed me and this one was no different.
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GrahamCDowns More than 1 year ago
I often caught myself thinking, as I read this book, that this series is beginning to get a little long in the tooth now, after three books. In the first book, the plot was to assassinate Duke Leto Atreides. In the second book, it was to assassinate his son, Paul "Maud'Dib" Atreides. Now, in the third book, it is to assassinate his twin children, Ghanima and Leto II. But like the other three, there is way more to it than an assassination plot! There are plots within plots within plots. It's long, convoluted, frustrating and difficult to read at times. But in true Frank Herbert style, just when you think of abandoning the book, some new twist leaps off the pages at you, and you can't put it down until you find out how the new hook will turn out. By the third book, the planet of Arrakis has changed so much that it's very difficult to think of it as the same place you encounter in the first book. But still, many things are still the same, and one of the sub-plots is a struggle to return the planet to the way it once was. I was planning to give this book two stars, and remove the rest of the series from my to-read list. The ending changed my mind; it shocked me so much that I simply cannot wait to see what happens next!
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