Children of the Goddess

Children of the Goddess

by Marine Carrin

Hardcover

$64.95
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Overview

The women featured in this book Children of the Goddess: Devotion and Female Priesthood in Bengal live on the frontier between the tribal and the low-caste society in Bengal, and turn to religion in order to forge a new identity. Often rejected by their own community, and having lived through long and difficult personal crises some of them turn to religion to accultured identity. Some may succeed in becoming female priests, presiding over a Goddess shrine, having given up their femininity by ceasing to menstruate. As Parvati, the central personality of the book, puts it: ‘Now I no longer need a child. I am the child of the Goddess’, even as she innovates on the boundaries of Hinduism. The book provides a window to a little-known world where social marginality, subaltern assertion, the politics of gender, and the contestation between tribal religion and Hinduism merge to produce a unique perspective on popular Hinduism.



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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9789386552549
Publisher: Ratna Sagar P Ltd.
Publication date: 02/15/2018
Pages: 314
Product dimensions: 6.14(w) x 9.21(h) x 0.88(d)

About the Author

Marine Carrin is Director of Research Emeritus (CNRS) at the Centre d'Anthropologie Sociale, Toulouse. She is the author of La Fleur et l'Os: symbolisme et rituel chez les Santal (1986); Enfants de la Déesse: prêtrise et dévotion féminine au Bengal (1997); Le Parler des Dieux: le discours rituel santal entre l'oral et l'écrit (2016); and co-author of An Encounter of Peripheries: Santals, Missionaries and their Changing Worlds, 1867-1900 (with H. Tambs-Lyche, 2008) and From Fire Rain to Rebellion: Reasserting Ethnic Identity through Narrative (with P.Andersen and S. Soren, 2011). She is presently editing BRILL's Encyclopedia of the Religions among the Indigenous People of South Asia, as well as working on indigenous knowledge and the Bhuta cult in South Kanara.

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