Children of the Mind (Ender Quintet Series #4)

Children of the Mind (Ender Quintet Series #4)

by Orson Scott Card
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Overview

Children of the Mind (Ender Quintet Series #4) by Orson Scott Card

The planet Lusitania is home to three sentient species: the Pequeninos; a large colony of humans; and the Hive Queen, brought there by Ender. But once against the human race has grown fearful; the Starways Congress has gathered a fleet to destroy Lusitania.

Jane, the evolved computer intelligence, can save the three sentient races of Lusitania. She has learned how to move ships outside the universe, and then instantly back to a different world, abolishing the light-speed limit. But it takes all the processing power available to her, and the Starways Congress is shutting down the Net, world by world.

Soon Jane will not be able to move the ships. Ender's children must save her if they are to save themselves.

Children of the Mind is the fourth book in Orson Scott Card's Ender Quintet.


At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781429963923
Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates
Publication date: 11/30/2009
Series: Ender Quintet Series , #4
Sold by: Macmillan
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 352
Sales rank: 52,796
File size: 372 KB

About the Author

Orson Scott Card is best known for his science fiction novel Ender's Game and it's many sequels that expand the Ender Universe into the far future and the near past. Those books are organized into the Ender Quintet, the five books that chronicle the life of Ender Wiggin; the Shadow Series, that follows on the novel Ender's Shadow and are set on Earth; and the Formic Wars series, written with co-author Aaron Johnston, that tells of the terrible first contact between humans and the alien "Buggers".

Card has been a working writer since the 1970s. Beginning with dozens of plays and musical comedies produced in the 1960s and 70s, Card's first published fiction appeared in 1977 -- the short story "Gert Fram" in the July issue of The Ensign, and the novelet version of "Ender's Game" in the August issue of Analog.

The novel-length version of Ender's Game, published in 1984 and continuously in print since then, became the basis of the 2013 film, starring Asa Butterfield, Harrison Ford, Ben Kingsley, Hailee Steinfeld, Viola Davis, and Abigail Breslin.

Card was born in Washington state, and grew up in California, Arizona, and Utah. He served a mission for the LDS Church in Brazil in the early 1970s. Besides his writing, he runs occasional writers' workshops and directs plays. He frequently teaches writing and literature courses at Southern Virginia University.

He is the author many sf and fantasy novels, including the American frontier fantasy series "The Tales of Alvin Maker" (beginning with Seventh Son), There are also stand-alone science fiction and fantasy novels like Pastwatch and Hart's Hope. He has collaborated with his daughter Emily Card on a manga series, Laddertop. He has also written contemporary thrillers like Empire and historical novels like the monumental Saints and the religious novels Sarah and Rachel and Leah. Card's recent work includes the Mithermages books (Lost Gate, Gate Thief), contemporary magical fantasy for readers both young and old.

Card lives in Greensboro, North Carolina, with his wife, Kristine Allen Card, He and Kristine are the parents of five children and several grandchildren.


Orson Scott Card is best known for his science fiction novel Ender's Game and its many sequels that expand the Ender Universe into the far future and the near past. Those books are organized into the Ender Quintet, the five books that chronicle the life of Ender Wiggin; the Shadow Series, that follows on the novel Ender's Shadow and are set on Earth; and the Formic Wars series, written with co-author Aaron Johnston, that tells of the terrible first contact between humans and the alien "Buggers." Card has been a working writer since the 1970s. Beginning with dozens of plays and musical comedies produced in the 1960s and 70s, Card's first published fiction appeared in 1977 -- the short story "Gert Fram" in the July issue of The Ensign, and the novelette version of "Ender's Game" in the August issue of Analog. The novel-length version of Ender's Game, published in 1984 and continuously in print since then, became the basis of the 2013 film, starring Asa Butterfield, Harrison Ford, Ben Kingsley, Hailee Steinfeld, Viola Davis, and Abigail Breslin. Card was born in Washington state, and grew up in California, Arizona, and Utah. He served a mission for the LDS Church in Brazil in the early 1970s. Besides his writing, he runs occasional writers' workshops and directs plays. He frequently teaches writing and literature courses at Southern Virginia University.
He is the author many sf and fantasy novels, including the American frontier fantasy series "The Tales of Alvin Maker" (beginning with Seventh Son), There are also stand-alone science fiction and fantasy novels like Pastwatch and Hart's Hope. He has collaborated with his daughter Emily Card on a manga series, Laddertop. He has also written contemporary thrillers like Empire and historical novels like the monumental Saints and the religious novels Sarah and Rachel and Leah. Card's recent work includes the Mithermages books (Lost Gate, Gate Thief), contemporary magical fantasy for readers both young and old. Card lives in Greensboro, North Carolina, with his wife, Kristine Allen Card, He and Kristine are the parents of five children and several grandchildren.

Hometown:

Greensboro, North Carolina

Date of Birth:

August 24, 1951

Place of Birth:

Richland, Washington

Education:

B.A. in theater, Brigham Young University, 1975; M.A. in English, University of Utah, 1981

Customer Reviews

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Children of the Mind (Ender Wiggin Series #4) 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 247 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
An amazing piece of work from Card, and a great end to the Ender quartet. It is ignorant to think that the ending 'leaves you hanging' because Card could have just as easily put in an ending that makes all the readers happy. But, if you don't understand the ending to the book, then Card's whole meaning is lost to you. Just as well, I'm confused at how someone who finds parts of the book 'so boring' that they had to skip entire chapters completely, has any say in how good or bad a book is if they technically never even read the whole book. The final book in the Ender series touches on as many aspects of human nature as 'Xenocide' did, and truly forces you to make the connection between the Ender's universe and our present, and think of what Card is trying to convey to the reader. Excellent writing, and a pleasant and satisfying end to the Ender series that should not be missed out on.
eisen_TDH_herz More than 1 year ago
I read this because it was part of the Ender Wiggin series, which turned into one of my favorite book series. It took me a while to get into it, It is not a bad read, if you can force yourself to read past the boring parts. Though definitely not the best in Enderverse, I would highly recommend reading this if you have read the previous novels to the series. The entire novel is NOT horrible, so do not be dissuaded by the negativity in this review.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have to say that people are being a little hard on this book. I thought that it was great...not only did we grow to love Ender MORE, but we also got to learn more about the Hive Queen and the pequininos, which I was frankly happy about. I thought that the character struggles and triumphs were so intense at times, that I felt moved. Jane, who I didn't care a lot for in previous books, became someone I actually cared about. Even Peter became likable. All in all, I say definitely read this book, maybe you will like it even better than Ender's Game.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Read the entire series years ago love it wanted to read it again. Loved it the second time as well. the characters come to life on the pages with great story line.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The series starts off with a book that any pre-teen and older can comfortably read, enjoy and understand. But after that, the books begin to take a more philosophical root that forces the reader to think. A lot. But overal this was a great run with Ender
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book plays with a lot of psycological factors. It talkes about how we treet others and what we would do if we met an alien race, considering this. It shows the relationship between people ans peoples. A must read for all ages. Card's doen it again; another great well thought through book!
patches_mcmatt More than 1 year ago
I first read Enders Game a year or so ago ffe a literature class in college ad loved it, but never had the time to read the other tree books in the Ender Wiggins series. Now that I have, I can honestly say that I should have read all the books back to back. Awesome story and characters! I loved this series.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I started reading a few days ago and can almost not put it down. its is a hard book to understand and comprehend but its not so bad...i read reviews and thought that it was going to be a hard book to read but if you've read the other three books you can definetly read this one.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved this book more than xenocide or even ender's game. C'mon this one is one of card's best. Dont believe most of the other reviews, this is a must read. If you want to skip a few books of card then skip the Bean saga but dont even consider skipping this book. The only reason that you should skip this book is if you hated the whole ender saga exept Ender's game.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
So, so manyof the people commenting make me feel sorry for them. What so many seize to understand is that, if you dwell in the fact that the book is confusing, you are preventing yourself from enjoying the book. I learned this while reading Xenocide, the third book in the series. I was deeply confused at first, but to realize what a great story any book tells, you must get past your confusion. Another thing that is silly is that, those who dwell in the fact that a book is confusing do not ever seem to realize that well over half of the things that are confusing are things that you don't even need to know to enjoy the book.
DJ_Dinosaur More than 1 year ago
Ender's Game and Speaker for the Dead are two of the best science fiction books i have read, and i can say that Children of the Mind is written with the same excellence of the first two books. Although Xenocide was a weak link in the series, it was necessary for the storyline of Children of the Mind. I strongly recommend the Ender's Quartet to any science fiction fan.
harstan More than 1 year ago
Ender Wiggin continues to redeem his life following the genocide he once caused. Ender resides on the planet Lusitania, home to the indigenous Pequeninos, a human settlement, and the Hive Queen he saved.

Ender soon finds life is a circle as the weapon that he used thousands of years ago has come to destroy his adopted home. The Starways Congress has sent a fleet to destroy the planet out of fear of a virus traced back to Lusitania. They also want to kill Ender's friend, Jane the computer for they are afraid of her ability to control communications. Jane tries to save the sentient races of Lusitania before the Congress shuts down her intergalactic Net. Meanwhile Ender makes a last stand by creating replicas of his brother Peter and his sister Valentine.

The conclusion of the Ender¿s series is a strong entry that readers will appreciate if they have read the previous novels. The tale provides the Orson Scott Card¿s powerful philosophy of involvement inside a strong redemption story line. However, many threads tied up in this novel will mean nothing to new readers, as this book is not a stand-alone. Still CHILDREN OF THE MIND is a fine finale (with new dangling threads) to a wonderful series.

Harriet Klausner

Guest More than 1 year ago
I thought that it was a great book to add to the other three of this quartet. I recommend it for card's fans. A great book. Not as good as the first three but still good.
Adam_Gentry More than 1 year ago
Time grows short, as hope lies ahead. Against all odds Lusitania has done the impossible. They’ve cured the Descolada and begun colonizing other worlds, ensuring the survival of both pequininos and hive queens. But the fleet is still drawing near, and Jane is powerless to stop them. For Congress has become aware of her, and is already preparing to shut down the network that houses Jane’s mind. To survive Jane must turn to an old friend, and take what he most holds dear. Following on the heels of the previous book, Children of the Mind opens on an outsider’s perspective; nesting the obligatory review within the character’s efforts to understand the unknown that is Peter. This echoes the ongoing conflict of the entire series, the struggle within each character to understand “the other” and accept them as “one of us”. A few quick references to the ongoing threat help inject fresh tension, but characters remain the focus of the series, using rich relationships to explore various philosophical issues. And yet something is missing. Innovative ideas have always been a hallmark of the series, but now they’re relegated to the sidelines, replaced with new relationships that race towards either tragedy or romance, setting the stage for the oldest of endings. A satisfying end to a strong series that began at the height of storytelling, and fought valiantly to stay aloft. +Strong Characters +Strong Pacing *Strong but familiar ideas *Interesting Settings -Predictable Plot 3/5
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Taking almost two years to complete this book, it did lag slighy though not immensely and it never left my interest to complete. It is well-planned and although it is odd to have the ending it did,it is sensible and not an unworthy read.
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4 stars
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