The Children of the Sky

The Children of the Sky

by Vernor Vinge
3.7 28

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Overview

The Children of the Sky by Vernor Vinge

The Children of the Sky continues the epic scifi adventure of Hugo award-winning A Fire Upon the Deep!

“Vinge is one of the best visionary writers of SF today.” David Brin

Thousands of years in the future, humanity is no longer alone in a universe where a mind's potential is determined by its location in space, from superintelligent entities in the Transcend, to the limited minds of the Unthinking Depths, where only simple creatures, and technology, can function. Nobody knows what strange force partitioned space into these "regions of thought," but when the warring Straumli realm use an ancient Transcendent artifact as a weapon, they unwittingly unleash an awesome power that destroys thousands of worlds and enslaves all natural and artificial intelligence.

Ten years have passed on Tines World, and Ravna and the children have survived a war. While there is peace among the Tines, there are those among them—and among the humans—who seek power…and no matter the cost, these malcontents are determined to overturn the fledgling civilization that has taken root since the humans landed.


Tor books by Vernor Vinge

Realtime/Bobble Series
The Peace War
Marooned in Realtime

Other Novels
The Witling
Tatja Grimm's World
Rainbows End

Collections
Collected Stories of Vernor Vinge
True Names

At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781429993364
Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates
Publication date: 10/11/2011
Series: Zones of Thought , #3
Sold by: Macmillan
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 448
Sales rank: 160,180
File size: 1 MB

About the Author

Vernor Vinge has won five Hugo Awards, including one for each of his last three novels, A Fire Upon the Deep (1992), A Deepness in the Sky (1999), and Rainbow's End (2006). Known for his rigorous hard-science approach to his science fiction, he became an iconic figure among cybernetic scientists with the publication in 1981 of his novella "True Names," which is considered a seminal, visionary work of Internet fiction. His many books also include Marooned in Realtime and The Peace War.

Born in Waukesha, Wisconsin and raised in Central Michigan, Vinge is the son of geographers. Fascinated by science and particularly computers from an early age, he has a Ph.D. in computer science, and taught mathematics and computer science at San Diego State University for thirty years. He has gained a great deal of attention both here and abroad for his theory of the coming machine intelligence Singularity. Sought widely as a speaker to both business and scientific groups, he lives in San Diego, California.


Vernor Vinge has won five Hugo Awards, including one for each of his last three novels, A Fire Upon the Deep (1992), A Deepness in the Sky (1999), and Rainbow’s End (2006). Known for his rigorous hard-science approach to his science fiction, he became an iconic figure among cybernetic scientists with the publication in 1981 of his novella "True Names," which is considered a seminal, visionary work of Internet fiction. His many books also include Marooned in Realtime and The Peace War. Born in Waukesha, Wisconsin and raised in Central Michigan, Vinge is the son of geographers. Fascinated by science and particularly computers from an early age, he has a Ph.D. in computer science, and taught mathematics and computer science at San Diego State University for thirty years. He has gained a great deal of attention both here and abroad for his theory of the coming machine intelligence Singularity. Sought widely as a speaker to both business and scientific groups, he lives in San Diego, California.

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Children of the Sky 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 28 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Not Vinge's best work by a longshot. While the prose is of excellent quality, the story is rather disinteresting. The protagonist survives exclusively by luck and charity - consequentially, it's hard to care much about her. Furthermore, the book comes to an end without resolving many of the more interesting conflicts contained within. Expect sequels.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is not a book with lots of ultra tech geekspeek or wars in heaven with godlike ai. This huge fifteen hundred page book follows Ravna as she struggles to prepare for that war. The real interest in this novel is the Tines as composite group minds and the implications of what that entails. Vinge does a great job with that, exploring how a Tine operates when members are killed or when single members try to join other packs and even what happens when thousands get together in a "choir". The weakness of the book is that some of the major characters make just freakin unbelievably naive, if not outright stupid decisions. Those drive much of the hectic chase scenes but I really couldn't buy that people who were trying to become gods in the last novel now became so naive in this one. The Tines are worth a novel yes, but this is a bit too huge for that. Not bad, you'll love the good Tines and hate the bad ones but its too long, unbelievable in spots and simply not a page turner.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A couple of interesting ideas regarding tines world are explored, but nothing that a short story or two would not have done just as well. I kept waiting for the story to break out, for the compelling challenge that would drive the plot and characters, but it never happened. Nevil is never believable as a villian, nor is it explained how Joanne, who is about to marry him, was so fooled. I simply concluded that her judgement could not be trusted, which was certainly not what Vinge had in mind. Written like a story an author felt compelled to write to fullfill a contract obligation or to satisfy his agent who thinks he can make money on it. No big ideas here (not even medium sized ones) and Vinge is a man we count on for big ideas. Oh, and why isn't the most obviously effective weapon - a loud noise generator - ever developed and used against the Tines? Glaring oversight.
harstan More than 1 year ago
A decade of survival problems have passed since Ravna Bergndot and the cryo Children of the Sky escaped the near extinction Blight of humanity by landing on Tines World (see A Fire Upon the Deep). They build a civilization of sorts with the help of telepathic Tine canines. However, humans remain scornful of the Blight peril as a sham to obtain and maintain power, and some local Tine inhabitants want the off-worlders to leave as they believe the outsiders are a blight to their world. Although natural enemies, these diverse groups hold in common one thing: the failure of Bergndot and her hundred children at any cost. The Children of the Sky is a strong science fiction thriller that focuses on how far humanity has fallen in technology since the adventures in A Fire Upon the Deep. The human skeptics will remind readers of climate change deniers while the Tine is divided between friendly and hostile towards the newcomers. Although the climax is disappointing as it ends with another novel to follow, fans will appreciate Vernor Vinge's follow-up to what happened to those who fled the Blight. Harriet Klausner
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
For as smart as all the main characters are supposed to be, they sure keep making some pretty dumb choices. I so very much looked forward to this sequal of "A Fire Upon the Deep" but this book was a disappointment What I wanted to read about was Vinge's fascinating world building introduced in this serie's first book: the Skroriders, the various zones, and what was happening with the blight. But no, all we got was a rehash, in a very poor way, of one plot element from the first book. I think the main reason this book qualifies as SciFi is that Ravna thinks about these elements once in awhile, but that's all she does, along with way too much whining. Please, Mr. Vinge, if you continue this series (and I hope you do), bring back the Blight and all the fascinating other races. Bring us back into space and make your characters more believable.
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Read the first book and this is a good one too.