Children of the Sun: A History of Humanity's Unappeasable Appetite for Energy

Children of the Sun: A History of Humanity's Unappeasable Appetite for Energy

by Alfred W. Crosby
4.0 1
ISBN-10:
0393931536
ISBN-13:
9780393931532
Pub. Date:
08/15/2007
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Select a Purchase Option (New Edition)
  • purchase options
    $6.27 $25.75 Save 76%
    • Free return shipping at the end of the rental period details
    • Textbook Rentals in 3 Easy Steps  details
    icon-error
    Note: Access code and/or supplemental material are not guaranteed to be included with textbook rental or used textbook.
  • purchase options
    $24.97 $25.75 Save 3% Current price is $24.97, Original price is $25.75. You Save 3%.
  • purchase options
    $13.73 $25.75 Save 47% Current price is $13.73, Original price is $25.75. You Save 47%.
    icon-error
    Note: Access code and/or supplemental material are not guaranteed to be included with textbook rental or used textbook.
  • purchase options

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Children of the Sun: A History of Humanity's Unappeasable Appetite for Energy 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Gregory104 More than 1 year ago
Children of the Sun written by Alfred W. Crosby presents a very well written account on humanity’s use of energy mainly during Periods 1, 4, 5, and 6 in the AP World History timeline. In this book, Crosby goes on to tell not just what the energy sources we have used throughout humanity, but he also tells how they have impacted our global culture and environment, possible solutions to how humanity can resolve problems with energy sources we use now, and what he suggests may be the best for energy production and use in the future. Before I began reading this book, I was expecting much less than what I had actually read. With the book having less than 200 pages, I was quite surprised to see how many different things the book covered. With being such a short book, I found the book to be a very good read for informational purposes, especially since it covered a good amount of the time periods studied in AP World History. I believe that Crosby also did well at completing his purpose for the Children of the Sun. I feel that the book is very informative and short enough to be considered a good tool for studying for a test such as the AP World History exam. Crosby also keeps things interesting without going off into his book sounding like a textbook, as he chimes in with his thoughts and ideas every so often to make things sound more interesting. With all the books he had published prior to Children of the Sun and with being a professor emeritus (successful and retired) at the University of Texas at Austin, I can say that Crosby did an A+ job in using his years of experience to tell the story of human-used energy and alternative ways we can now use it and develop it for the future.