China, During the War and Since the Peace

China, During the War and Since the Peace

by John Francis Davis

NOOK BookDigitized from 1852 volume (eBook - Digitized from 1852 volume)

FREE
View All Available Formats & Editions
Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
LendMe® See Details
Want a NOOK ? Explore Now

Overview

China, During the War and Since the Peace by John Francis Davis

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
PREFACE. Vll calculate the extent of the forthcoming revolutions in the channels of national and commercial intercourse. But it may be predicted that a British colony with twenty-five thousand Chinese subjects, in sight of the south coast of China, is destined to play a part in the drama of the future. The two concluding chapters of the last volume, on the Indo-Chinese nations, may prove interesting at the present time. The chapter on Japan was already in the press, when the intelligence of an American mission to that country, of five vessels of war, reached London. Whatever may be the result of this undertaking, nothing important is likely to be gained by mere negociation, as the United States had already, in 1846, about as strong a force in the bay of Je"do, including a ship of 90 guns, under Commodore Biddle. It is possible that the present exclusively navalarmament may prove sufficient to carry out strong measures; but its amount is very different from our own seventy vessels of war and transports, with twelve thousand fighting men, before the walls of Nanking in 1842. If not sufficient, however, it may lead to something farther, from either the same or some other quarter. Vol. ii. page 287. This expedition is an opportune confirmation of the views and expectations entertained in the two chapters on the Indo- Chinese nations, who certainly will not be allowed much longer to remain in a state of avowed hostility to the rest of the world ; — more especially Japan, which fires on ships in their necessity, and exhibits shipwrecked mariners in cages, preparatory to a cruel death. With them, at least, the time has arrived, pacis imponere morem. It remains for the rest of the civilised PREFACE. world to wish the United States all success, and to expect that t...

Product Details

BN ID: 2940024174876
Publisher: Longman, Brown, Green , and Longmans
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 382 KB

Read an Excerpt


PREFACE. Vll calculate the extent of the forthcoming revolutions in the channels of national and commercial intercourse. But it may be predicted that a British colony with twenty-five thousand Chinese subjects, in sight of the south coast of China, is destined to play a part in the drama of the future. The two concluding chapters of the last volume, on the Indo-Chinese nations, may prove interesting at the present time. The chapter on Japan was already in the press, when the intelligence of an American mission to that country, of five vessels of war, reached London. Whatever may be the result of this undertaking, nothing important is likely to be gained by mere negociation, as the United States had already, in 1846, about as strong a force in the bay of Je"do, including a ship of 90 guns, under Commodore Biddle. It is possible that the present exclusively navalarmament may prove sufficient to carry out strong measures; but its amount is very different from our own seventy vessels of war and transports, with twelve thousand fighting men, before the walls of Nanking in 1842. If not sufficient, however, it may lead to something farther, from either the same or some other quarter. Vol. ii. page 287. This expedition is an opportune confirmation of the views and expectations entertained in the two chapters on the Indo- Chinese nations, who certainly will not be allowed much longer to remain in a state of avowed hostility to the rest of the world ; more especially Japan, which fires on ships in their necessity, and exhibits shipwrecked mariners in cages, preparatory to a cruel death. With them, at least, the time has arrived, pacis imponere morem. It remains for the rest of the civilisedPREFACE. world to wish the United States all success, and to expect that t...

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews