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Chocolatina
     

Chocolatina

4.8 5
by Erik Kraft, Denise Brunkus (Illustrator)
 

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Tina's health teacher is always admonishing her students, "You are what you eat!" But all Tina likes to eat is chocolate. One day she wishes Mrs. Ferdman's favorite saying were true, and the very next morning she wakes up a completely chocolate girl! How is she going to become an un-chocolate girl? Full color.

Overview

Tina's health teacher is always admonishing her students, "You are what you eat!" But all Tina likes to eat is chocolate. One day she wishes Mrs. Ferdman's favorite saying were true, and the very next morning she wakes up a completely chocolate girl! How is she going to become an un-chocolate girl? Full color.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Gwynne Spencer
Tina loves chocolate. She eats more than her share of it. When her mean teacher, Mrs. Ferdman, makes all the kids repeat "You are what you eat!," Tina (a.k.a. Chocolatina) responds, "I wish that were true." That very night, guess who turns into a chocolate girl, all stiff and prone to melty feet? The teacher attacks Chocolatina, trying to bite off her ear (is this cannibalism?). Justice prevails: the teacher's assault is prevented by the timely appearance of the school principal, and Mrs. Ferdman is banished from the school. Chocolatina is on the verge of character change. That evening at home, Tina wishes to be her old self and vows to give up chocolate. She gets back her old self, but really does not reform, as it turns out. However, the banished teacher does turn into chocolate. A sheet of scratch-and-sniff stickers in the front of the book are remarkably unsniffy, but the artwork is lively and funny (Denise Brunkus is the illustrator for the Junie B. Jones series) and fits nicely with Chocolate Touch and Chocolate Fever in the "excessive consumption" category. Reviewer: Gwynne Spencer
School Library Journal
Gr 1-4Tina loves chocolate more than anything else, "more than birthdays, more than roller skating, and definitely more than dried fruit." When her health teacher, Mrs. Ferdman, makes the class repeat the mantra, "You are what you eat," Tina wishes it would come true. When she wakes up the next morning to find herself transformed, though, she discovers that being chocolate isn't nearly as much fun as eating it. To Tina's great relief, however, she is restored to her normal self the next day, and resolves to give up her favorite treat foreverright after a giant bowl of Choco-Crunchies. Children will appreciate this story's zany humor, and will particularly enjoy seeing the prim Mrs. Ferdman receive her just deserts. Tina is a spirited heroine who will surely gain the sympathy of anyone who has ever had too much of a good thing. The illustrations, brimming with child appeal, show youngsters at their wacky bestgrimacing at dried prunes and staring with raised eyebrows at their chocolate classmate. Sly details appear here and there in the paintings: a snake slithers out of someone's desk and Mrs. Ferdman wears earrings shaped like chocolate kisses. Filled with exuberance from start to finish, this story will make a rousing read-aloud.Dawn Amsberry, Oakland Public Library, CA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780816747368
Publisher:
Troll Communications L.L.C.
Publication date:
03/28/2003
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.16(w) x 10.04(h) x 0.09(d)
Lexile:
560L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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Chocolatina 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
sandylovesbooks More than 1 year ago
My four-year-old granddaughter loves chocolate and loves this book. It is a story similar to Midas when the girl turns into chocolate. We found this book funny, well-written, and a good story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
slaydon More than 1 year ago
This is a very cute story about a girl who loves chocolate and how it can get her into trouble. Great for preschool to 2nd graders. Great for discussions with your children to work on comprehension. This story is funy enough they will want to read it until the covers are gone and retaped back on
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Wonderful book for kids! I read it so often that after a week, my 2 and 4 year olds read it to me, they memorized it of course. I recommend it!