Christianity in Central Tanzania: A Story of African Encounters and Initiatives in Ugogo and Ukaguru, 1876-1933

Christianity in Central Tanzania: A Story of African Encounters and Initiatives in Ugogo and Ukaguru, 1876-1933

by Mwita Akiri

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Overview

In the telling of the history of the Church Missionary Society (CMS) in Tanzania, the initiatives, contributions, and experiences of indigenous teachers have too often been neglected in favour of stories of sacrifices of Western missionaries. Bishop Mwita Akiri redresses this bias by using a socio-historical approach, written from an Afro-centric tradition, to evaluate the contributions and experiences of indigenous agents in the growth of Christianity in Tanzania. This book underscores the significance of oral tradition in African historiography and challenges the claim that foreign missionaries succeeded in destroying African cultures, when they are in fact alive and well. This much-needed research also provides a model for dialogue between the perspective of Christian missions and that of African religious and social heritage in order to continue forward with a Christianity that is authentic and also distinctly African.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781783688029
Publisher: Langham Creative Projects
Publication date: 02/14/2020
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 438
File size: 3 MB

Table of Contents

  1. Acknowledgements
  2. Abstract
  3. Abbreviations
  4. Notes on Names and Terminology
  5. Names
  6. Terminology
  7. Chapter 1 Nature of Study, Scope, and Research Methodology
    1. 1.1 Nature of Study
    2. 1.2 Scope
    3. 1.3 Research Methodology
    4. 1.4 A Complementary Role of Data Sources


  8. Chapter 2 Gogo and Kaguru Societies in the Late Ninteenth Century
    1. 2.1 Geography of Ugogo and Ukaguru
    2. 2.2 The Formation of the Gogo and Kaguru Societies
    3. 2.3 Political Organization
    4. 2.4 Social Structure
    5. 2.5 Aspects of Gogo and Kaguru Social Customs
    6. 2.6 Aspects of Gogo and Kaguru Religions
    7. 2.7 Conclusion


  9. Chapter 3 Christian Developments in Ugogo and Ukaguru 1876–1900
    1. 3.1 King Mutesa of Buganda and Henry Stanley
    2. 3.2 Mpwapwa: A Place of Significance
    3. 3.3 Mpwapwa, Chamuhawi, and Mamboya: The Survivors
    4. 3.4 The End of Self-Preservation and the Birth of an Expansion Era
    5. 3.5 Conclusion


  10. Chapter 4 The Initiatives of the Gogo and Kaguru Chiefs
    1. 4.1 Chiefs as Indigenous Agents
    2. 4.2 Chiefs and the Establishment of Mission Stations
    3. 4.3 Chiefs, Buildings and Literacy Classes
    4. 4.4 Chiefs and German Colonial Education Policy
    5. 4.5 The “Threat” of Islam
    6. 4.6 Standing by the “Fence”: Chiefs and Conversion
    7. 4.7 Conclusion


  11. Chapter 5 Educational Contributions of Indigenous Teachers
    1. 5.1 Literacy Training as a Missionary Method
    2. 5.2 The Out-School as Chief Agencies for Evangelization
    3. 5.3 The Medium of Instruction in the German Colonial Era
    4. 5.4 Teaching Methods at the Out-Schools
    5. 5.5 Missionary Focus on Children
    6. 5.6 Competition with Roman Catholic Missions
    7. 5.7 African Conversion and Motives of Adult Converts
    8. 5.8 The Catechetical Process
    9. 5.9 Conclusion


  12. Chapter 6 Missionary Contributions of Indigenous Teachers
    1. 6.1 The Nature of Appointments and Contributions
    2. 6.2 Biographical Notes of Some Indigenous Teachers and Missionaries
    3. 6.3 Indigenous Initiatives During the First World War
    4. 6.4 Conclusion


  13. Chapter 7 Secularization of Mission Education and Its Impact
    1. 7.1 Background of the Philosophy of Adaptation
    2. 7.2 British Educational Policy in Tanzania
    3. 7.3 Government Educational Policy: Conflicting Responses
    4. 7.4 Conclusion


  14. Chapter 8 The Training and Development of Indigenous Teachers
    1. 8.1 In-service Semi-residential Training
    2. 8.2 Residential Training
    3. 8.3 Women’s Training
    4. 8.4 Ordination as a “Climax” of Leadership Development
    5. 8.5 A Delayed Ordained Ministry: Some Factors
    6. 8.6 A New Era for Indigenous Leadership Development?
    7. 8.7 Conclusion


  15. Chapter 9 General Conclusion
    1. 9.1 Aims of Study and Chapters Revisited
    2. 9.2 Relevance for Mission of the Anglican Church of Tanzania
    3. 9.3 Toward a Dialogue with African Traditional Heritage
    4. 9.4 The Study of Christianity in the Non-Western World


  16. Appendixes
  17. CMS Glossary
  18. Bibliography
  19. Primary Sources
  20. Published Sources

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