A Clash of Kings (A Song of Ice and Fire #2)

A Clash of Kings (A Song of Ice and Fire #2)

by George R. R. Martin

Paperback(Mass Market Paperback - Reissue)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780553579901
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Publication date: 09/05/2000
Series: Song of Ice and Fire Series
Edition description: Reissue
Pages: 1040
Sales rank: 16,419
Product dimensions: 4.24(w) x 6.86(h) x 1.72(d)
Age Range: 14 - 18 Years

About the Author

George R. R. Martin is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of many novels, including the acclaimed series A Song of Ice and Fire—A Game of Thrones, A Clash of Kings, A Storm of Swords, A Feast for Crows, and A Dance with Dragons—as well as Tuf Voyaging, Fevre Dream, The Armageddon Rag, Dying of the Light, Windhaven (with Lisa Tuttle), and Dreamsongs Volumes I and II. He is also the creator of The Lands of Ice and Fire, a collection of maps from A Song of Ice and Fire featuring original artwork from illustrator and cartographer Jonathan Roberts, and The World of Ice & Fire (with Elio M. García, Jr., and Linda Antonsson). As a writer-producer, Martin has worked on The Twilight Zone, Beauty and the Beast, and various feature films and pilots that were never made. He lives with the lovely Parris in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Hometown:

Santa Fe, NM

Date of Birth:

September 20, 1948

Place of Birth:

Bayonne, NJ

Education:

B.S., Northwestern University, 1970; M.S., Northwestern University, 1971

Read an Excerpt

ARYA

At Winterfell they had called her "Arya Horseface" and she'd thought nothing could be worse, but that was before the orphan boy Lommy Greenhands had named her "Lumpyhead."

Her head felt lumpy when she touched it. When Yoren had dragged her into that alley she'd thought he meant to kill her, but the sour old man had only held her tight, sawing through her mats and tangles with his dagger. She remembered how the breeze sent the fistfuls of dirty brown hair skittering across the paving stones, toward the sept where her father had died. "I'm taking men and boys from the city," Yoren growled as the sharp steel scrapedat her head. "Now you hold still, boy." By the time he had finished, her scalp was nothing but tufts and stubble.

Afterward he told her that from there to Winterfell she'd be Arry the orphan boy. "Gate shouldn't be hard, but the road's another matter. You got a long way to go in bad company. I got thirty this time, men and boys all bound for the Wall, and don't be thinking they're like that bastard brother o' yours." He shook her. "Lord Eddard gave me pick o' the dungeons, and I didn't find no little lordlings down there. This lot, half o' them would turn you over to the queen quick as spit for a pardon and maybe a few silvers. The other half'd do the same, only they'd rape you first. So you keep to yourself and make your water in the woods,alone. That'll be the hardest part, the pissing, so don't drink no more'n you need."

Leaving King's Landing was easy, just like he'd said. The Lannister guardsmen on the gate were stopping everyone, but Yoren called one by name and theirwagons were waved through. No one spared Arya a glance. They were looking for a highborn girl, daughter of the King's Hand, not for a skinny boy with his hair chopped off. Arya never looked back. She wished the Rush would rise and wash the whole city away, Flea Bottom and the Red Keep and the Great Sept and everything, and everyone too, especially Prince Joffrey and his mother. But she knew it wouldn't, and anyhow Sansa was still in the city and would wash away too. When she remembered that, Arya decided to wish for Winterfell instead.

Yoren was wrong about the pissing, though. That wasn't the hardest part at all; Lommy Greenhands and Hot Pie were the hardest part. Orphan boys. Yoren had plucked some from the streets with promises of food for their bellies and shoes for their feet. The rest he'd found in chains. "The Watch needs good men," he told them as they set out, "but you lot will have to do."

Yoren had taken grown men from the dungeons as well, thieves and poachers and rapers and the like. The worst were the three he'd found in the black cells who must have scared even him, because he kept them fettered hand and foot in the back of a wagon, and vowed they'd stay in irons all the way to the Wall. One had no nose, only the hole in his face where it had been cut off, and the gross fat bald one with the pointed teeth and the weeping sores on his cheeks had eyes like nothing human.

They took five wagons out of King's Landing, laden with supplies for the Wall: hides and bolts of cloth, bars of pig iron, a cage of ravens, books and paper and ink, a bale of sourleaf, jars of oil, and chests of medicine and spices. Teams of plow horses pulled the wagons, and Yoren had bought two coursers and a half-dozen donkeys for the boys. Arya would have preferred a real horse, but the donkey was better than riding on a wagon.

The men paid her no mind, but she was not so lucky with the boys. She was two years younger than the youngest orphan, not to mention smaller and skinnier, and Lommy and Hot Pie took her silence to mean she was scared, or stupid, or deaf. "Look at that sword Lumpyhead's got there," Lommy said one morning as they made their plodding way past orchards and wheat fields. He'd been a dyer's apprentice before he was caught stealing, and his arms were mottled green to the elbow. When he laughed he brayed like the donkeys they were riding.

"Where's a gutter rat like Lumpyhead get him a sword?"

Arya chewed her lip sullenly. She could see the back of Yoren's faded black cloak up ahead of the wagons, but she was determined not to go crying to him for help.

"Maybe he's a little squire," Hot Pie put in. His mother had been a baker before she died, and he'd pushed her cart through the streets all day, shouting "Hot pies! Hot pies!"

"Some lordy lord's little squire boy, that's it."

"He ain't no squire, look at him. I bet that's not even a real sword. I bet it's just some play sword made of tin."

Arya hated them making fun of Needle. "It's castle-forged steel, you stupid," she snapped, turning in the saddle to glare at them, "and you better shut your mouth."

The orphan boys hooted. "Where'd you get a blade like that, Lumpyface?" Hot Pie wanted to know.

"Lumpyhead," corrected Lommy. "He prob'ly stole it."

"I did not!" she shouted. Jon Snow had given her Needle. Maybe she had to let them call her Lumpyhead, but she wasn't going to let them call Jon a thief.

"If he stole it, we could take it off him," said Hot Pie. "It's not his anyhow. I could use me a sword like that."

Lommy egged him on. "Go on, take it off him, I dare you."

Hot Pie kicked his donkey, riding closer. "Hey, Lumpyface, you gimme that sword." His hair was the color of straw, his fat face all sunburnt and peeling. "You don't know how to use it."

Yes I do, Arya could have said. I killed a boy, a fat boy like you, I stabbed him in the belly and he died, and I'll kill you too if you don't let me alone. Only she did not dare. Yoren didn't know about the stableboy, but she was afraid of what he might do if he found out. Arya was pretty sure that some of the other men were killers too, the three in the manacles for sure, but the queen wasn't looking for them, so it wasn't the same.

"Look at him," brayed Lommy Greenhands. "I bet he's going to cry now. You want to cry, Lumpyhead?"

She had cried in her sleep the night before, dreaming of her father. Come morning, she'd woken red-eyed and dry, and could not have shed another tear if her life had hung on it.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Copyright© 2002 by George R.R. Martin

Table of Contents

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What People are Saying About This

Robert Jordan

Grabs hold and won't let go. It's brilliant.

Marion Zimmer Bradley

It is perhaps the best of the epic fantasies—readable and realistic.

Raymond E. Feist

George R. R. Martin is one of our very best science fiction writers, and this is one of his very best books.

Marion Zimmer. Bradley

It is perhaps the best of the epic fantasies—readable and realistic.

Anne McCaffrey

Such a splendid tale and such a fantistorical! I read my eyes out.

From the Publisher

‘Nobody does fantasy quite like George R.R. Martin’Sunday Times‘Colossal, staggering… Martin captures all the intoxicating complexity of the Wars of the Roses or Imperial Rome’SFX‘The sheer mind-boggling scope of this epic has sent other fantasy writers away shaking their heads… Its ambition: to construct the Twelve Caesars of fantasy fiction, with characters so venomous they could eat the Borgias’Guardian

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A Clash of Kings (A Song of Ice and Fire #2) 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3291 reviews.
JGolomb More than 1 year ago
Many editorial reviews of book (or movie) sequels claim that the second is as good as, or better than, the original. I read the same thing about "A Clash of Kings", George R.R. Martin's sequel to "A Game of Thrones". I was a bit skeptical, I mean...how can one not question whether Martin could duplicate what he accomplished in the first novel, let alone better it. "Thrones" is magnificently expansive and epic...how could book 2 match the energy and intensity? Martin absolutely knocked the ball out of the park with "Clash". I don't know if it's better than "Thrones", but it's easily its equal. He takes the core set of surviving characters (Arya, Sansa, Bran, Catelyn, Jon, Cersei and the wonderfully rich Tyrion), and picks up almost immediately where "Thrones" left off. And I don't just mean in terms of plot, but also in building out his fantastic world of intrigue, adventure and politics. "Clash" is complicated, intense and absolutely epic. It sprawls majestically over a widely varied physical and literary landscape. The politics within the plot, focused on four Kings battling over a land that's used to having only one, are intricate, but not difficult to follow. Martin's writing is clear, his dialogue is smooth and the interplay between characters is enjoyable and completely in sync with the overall tone and 'place' of the story. The book is very serious and heavy - at about 1,000 pages, the book is actually heavy, but I love the weightiness, with corresponding depth, of the story. Like "Thrones", there's not a ton of fantasy in "Clash". It's very middle-ages-historical-fiction with a tinge of supernatural. There's more fantasy in this book than in the first, though, and it feels like it'll build into much more for the third book. There are dragons, but they set up a certain tone and act more as a plot device than anything else. There's no fire-breathing and attacking and destroying. There's further development around Bran's supernatural connection with his direwolf Summer, and we see that the bastard Stark, Jon, has a bit of the gift as well. There are a few more fantastical devices scattered throughout the book, which Martin develops slowly through his world's mythology rather than hammering in a slew of de facto dungeons & dragons. The characters are Martin's true accomplishment. He feeds off a character's strengths and deficiencies, and each one is perfectly human and in some way relate-able. Individuals-as-'outsiders', is the base upon which the best characters are built. And he uses that foundation frequently. Tyrion, the dwarf prince, has become one of my favorite and most memorable characters in the series, and perhaps one of the most well-developed characters in any popular fiction. He's witty and smart, and sometimes obnoxiously flip. But his deep-seated insecurities which evolve slowly over the course of both of the first books make his chapters the most anticipated. Arya develops into a wonderfully three dimensional character as the tomboy princess cut off from her family, trying to survive and find a way back home. Sansa's princess-ly arrogance dissipates under the strain of trying to survive as a hostage, and finds friends in very un-princess-ly places. I'm looking forward to seeing HBO's creation of Martin's world of Ice and Fire coming this spring. Until then, I'll start digging into book 3 - "A Storm of S
GloveSlipper More than 1 year ago
Let me first state that I love this series. These books are wonderful for escaping on a snowy night. The characters, good or bad, continue to forge a place in your heart. The books have everything you would want from a work of fiction, except. This series is sad. Without any specific spoilers I can say that there is not one thing that has happened in this series that makes you feel good. Even when a character falls in love there is an underlying issue that makes the love a bad idea. The characters you care about are put through one horrific event after another and most of the characters are children. I know the series is far from finished but at this point, every single chapter you can rest assured that the characters you love will have nothing good happen to them. Read this series but take a break in between books. There is no rush as the author has very little interest in finishing the series quickly. Otherwise, the chapters begin to feel like a depressing grind.
thecollector0 More than 1 year ago
this is a good but very advanced series with many characters that you want to follow to find out more of the story. I thoroughly enjoyed this book as well as the others in the series, and again cannot wait to read the next one.
SallyPinkReviews More than 1 year ago
Martin pens a worthy follow up to his fantasy epic, "A Game of Thrones," with "A Clash of Kings." Mainly set on the land of Westros, several men fight for the crown of the seven kingdoms. Will there be a winner? In the east, Daenerys Targaryen, the mother of dragons, seeks to find a way to return to Westros. The story opens with the main characters observing a comet in the sky. Each has their own personal interpretations of the comet - good and bad. What I liked about Martin's use of the comet was how he evoked "an impending sense" about what was going to occur and what was inevitable. This tone lingers in the reader's mind as the story enfolds. Stannis, the previous king's rightful heir, has turned to sorcery and believes the time is right to attack Westros and secure his throne. With his backers and sorceress, he sets out to accomplish his inevitable mission. In King's Landing, the 13-year-old king, Joffery, demonstrates cruel brutality and little concern for the subjects who follow him. It's up to his uncle, Tyrion Lannister, to defend the city and carry out justice. Tyrion has quite a challenge considering the obstacles in his path. Tyrion's father, Tywin, fights north of King's Landing, but is unable to defeat Robb Stark's forces or secure his son, Jaime's, freedom. Catelyn Stark journeys to Storm's End and has an adventure before returning to Riverrun where she is determined to support her son, Robb. An explosive confrontation with Jaime Lannister towards the end of the story settles several issues for her. In the south, Renly Barathron makes plans to attack King's Landing, but first he must deal with his brother, Stannis. In the far the far east, Daenerys leads her Khalhaser through barren land before finding hope in the city of Quarth. Martin's story is told from several perspectives, giving the novel its epic fantasy feel. The writing is sharp and never lingers, moving from event to event at a crisp pace. Martin's characters give the story its heart. For Daenerys, her character continues to grow in inner strength and resolve. Theon's deception is heartbreaking, while Tyrion's honest approach as the King's Hand had me rooting for him despite the darkness behind the Lannister's bright colors. "A Clash of Kings" stirs a passion within the soul, making the reader feel as if they're a knight in Westros. The only drawback, while minor for me, were the open plot points at the end of the novel. While several ends were tied up, new ones developed. There's no feeling of satisfaction at the end just a restless anxiety that promises to continue with "A Storm of Swords." Martin, though, has me hooked, so I'll read to find out what happens next. Some, however, may find the unresolved ending frustrating. Who will be the king of the 7 kingdoms? Joffery? Renly? Stannis? Balon Greyjoy? Robb Stark
red14 More than 1 year ago
A Clash of Kings is a fantastic book abd a great addition to the Song of Ice and Fire series. A must read for Game of Thrones fans.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is not easy reading! You might need a score card to keep track of who's who. I like his style of writing and I couldn't wait to start the next book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this entire series. Just dont get attached to anyone
redfan More than 1 year ago
I'm about half-way into this book. The first book in the series just blew me away! It's a long series and the second book so far is really creating a thick plot... Martin is truly the best of all the modern fantasy writers & one of the best ever! I already have book #3 & #4 and will buy #5... if he ever releases it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a good book, but not as great as the first one. There were parts that I simply found boring and we were a little more behind the scenes in this book. However, there are plots within plots and schemes. We see who some of the characters really are in this book. Cant wait to read the next in the series.
ionestjames More than 1 year ago
A Clash of Kings is one of my favourite books of all time. As I may have mentioned, I am greatly interested in The War of the Roses. This book series is a war between the Starks and the Lannisters of the Westeros, and is loosely based on the war which took place between the Yorks and the Lancasters of England. The books are rather long and I find, like most novels these days, that the beginning doesn't really grip me. Martin's prologues tend to be a little dry and rather long-winded. 29 pages in this case. But, once you get into the actual story, its gripping and there are so many twists and turns that I actually had to put the book down and rethink what had just happened. There are characters you will love and hate, Catelyn and Sansa tend to whine a lot, but their chapters are quite short. The other thing that I love about this series is that, instead of it being like "Chapter 1" and "Chapter 300," each chapter is written from the point of view of a character from the book. This book contains accounts from the perspective of: Arya Stark, Sansa Stark, Bran Stark, Jon Snow, Tyrion Lannister, Daenerys Targaryen, Theon Greyjoy, Catelyn Stark, and Davos the Onion Knight. Each character has multiple chapters, so you aren't given so much information at one time that it becomes confusing. I think that is an extremely unique quality about this book. I would definitely recommend this book and book series to those who love fantasy. As George R. R. Martin put it, "I wanted to focus less on the magic of fantasy, and more on the men."
pen21 More than 1 year ago
They just get better! I read this book to finish it before the second season of the HBO series ended. This is a great series to revisit. There is great world building and a rich cast of characters. Arya stands out for me in this book for her bravery in this book. In this book Arya's character really shines for someone so young. I definitely recommend this series.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loved it! Didn't want it to end
Historienne More than 1 year ago
After writing such a smashingly successful beginning to a series such as A Game of Thrones was, many authors would have had difficulty in meeting the expectations of the rabid fandom for a sequel. Happily, though, Martin is too good an author to drop the ball on us as A Song of Ice and Fire continues. This second book in the saga is every bit as good as the first ... better even! The dynamic use of multiple narrative perspectives ranging from the youthful voices to the older, more world-weary continues. New POV characters such as Davos are introduced while fast favorites like Arya and Jon from the previous story return. Not only do we have more people to hear from, but they are moving further afield from one another, expanding the influence of the story to demonstrate how the wars of lions, direwolves and dragons reach to all corners of the world. It is a staggeringly broad story with a vast list of characters and factions, but Martin's deft writing keeps the reader on-track. If there is confusion it is likely that it is caused by intentional misdirection on the author's part in order to work through an important story arc ... sit tight and let it work itself out rather than getting frustrated. It's worth it! I came to take more of an interest in Catelyn's narrative this time around, but still couldn't warm to Danaerys. Arya and Sansa continued to be absorbing in their different ways, and Jon was (of course) arresting as always. I must confess, though, that Tyrion's is my favorite POV to read because of his humor and ability to find and use his own personal strengths despite all of the humiliation and cruelty he suffers at the hands of those who should love and value him. Each character is significant both individually and as part of the whole. They have their personal quirks and vices, but their unique outlooks can allow a view which presents the good in some of the least-loved characters, and the darkness in the ones we love the most. Again, a wonderful trip through Westeros. Bravo!
KatieCat6 More than 1 year ago
I truly can't put any of George R.R. Martin's books down once they're started. He keeps your mind constantly wondering and worrying about what's going to happen next. No character is safe.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This author has the ability to take you to another world and make you believe in it. The rollercoaster ride that is A Clash of Kings has more twists, turns, betrayals and folks that were thought to be dead showing up alive than an episode of Dallas. Flawed redeemable characters keep you guessing what will happen next...and guessing wrong! Love it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Be ready to spend many hours sorting things out in Westeros. Amazing writing, but takes a while to get used to sheer number of main plotlines and characters. Cant wait for this book in the HBO series in April.
Cynara on LibraryThing 29 days ago
A mixed lot, compared to the first book. Some of the storylines don't actually have that much happen - sometimes it feels like Martin is getting involved in worldbuilding and character-building and losing sight of moving his plot along. It's his gift as a writer that, while you're reading, you're as interested in it as he is. It's only when you finish the book that you realize that some writers would have dispatched most of Danaerys' plot in a single chapter. I was dreading Davos' chapters, which I remembered as being quite dreary, but they were better and fewer than I had remembered. On to the next!
rbtwinky on LibraryThing 29 days ago
It¿s hard to look at these books separately. They all certainly have a beginning and an ending, but the story is very continuous. I am very much enjoying the series with its wide array of characters. Arya and Tyrion are definitely my favorite characters, especially in this book.
edgeworth on LibraryThing 29 days ago
George R. R. Martin¿s Song of Ice And Fire series continues well, picking up where A Game of Thrones ended: with a number of different rulers vying for power following the death of the old king. The realm is wracked with war and chaos, and the surviving viewpoint characters from A Game of Thrones are joined by a few new ones as they struggle to seize power, fight tyranny or simply survive.Martin¿s pacing is still his strongest point; unlike many 1000+ page fantasy bricks, the books in A Song of Ice and Fire actually deserve to be as thick as they are. Martin never wastes time with unneccesary clutter, and the pacing of the story rarely flags.Characters are also considered one of his strong points, though I find a few of them to still be annoyingly dull (Jon) or inserted merely to serve as vantage points to critical plot elements (Catelyn, Davos). Theon undertakes a course of action which is a complete about-face from anything he¿s done before, and which would have been a lot better if there¿d been some foreshadowing for it in the first book. Bran spends too much of his time wandering about in a mythic dreamscape. Daenerys continues to be a fairly dull character, but was interesting to read about simply because she¿s in the most interesting locale in the books. Sansa is a dull character in a relatively interesting situation, held captive by the book¿s villains in a hostage/guest type relationship, and realising that she¿s going to have to try to hide her feelings and earn their trust and play a very long game to escape. Arya is much more interesting than she was in the previous book, as she flees north and provides the reader with a perspective of what the war is like for the peasants and stickpickers of the kingdom, caught between multiple armies and suffering badly for it.Far and away the best character is Tyrion Lannister, the cynical and conniving dwarf who is sent to the capital by his father to act as regent to the Lannister family¿s villanous boy-king, Joffrey. Tyrion is technically a bad guy, but he stands out as being one of the few characters with a brain in his head, which ¿ coupled with his dry wit ¿ make him easily the most likeable character and the one that you find yourself rooting for. The chapters in which he consolidates his power, working simultaneously with and against his sister, are some of the best in the book.Martin¿s tertiary characters, however ¿ of which there are hundreds, with extensive family appendices, the Freys and the Tyrells and the Tullys and so on ¿ are much more thinly drawn. Or perhaps they aren¿t, but there are so many of them, with so few distinctive names or characteristics, that it¿s hard to tell them apart when their myriad sons and nephews and cousins show up in armour at various battles or parleys. No matter ¿ they¿re rarely important, and Martin does a better job than I would expect of at least keeping roughly 20 or 30 key characters memorable.A Clash of Kings is a good, solid sophomore entry in a very engrossing fantasy series. Next up is A Storm of Swords.
ShaEliPar on LibraryThing 29 days ago
I started reading this one after my hubby and I finished the first season of Game of Thrones. Yep, we were way behind and just watched it this year, LOL. I wasn't sure this was going to be the kind of book for me since its huge and high fantasy, neither of which I'm a fan of. However, I think having watched the first season helped with grasping the many places and characters in the novel. Seriously, there are a LOT and there's even more in this book. I really loved the multiple POV's but be warned it can be over 100 pages before you get to go back to certain characters. Martin is a brilliant writer (although wordy) who easily captures you in his elaborate world with flawed characters and an intense political plot. This book was addicting and although it took me two weeks to read, I didn't pick up another book until it was over. I've now started reading the next book in the series, A Storm of Swords.
Jibar on LibraryThing 29 days ago
I was in desperate need of some time off for this novel when I was about halfway through. I cannot explain it, but it was the same with A Game of Thrones. I'm guessing it's the complexity of it, all of the plotlines that sometimes collide, or work together and it's just so busy, you want to take a breath at some point and read something less cruel, less breathtaking, less dramatic and less fantastic. I don't normally use GIFs in my reviews, but here it's totally needed in my opinion:It's not strictly true and I feel the people staring at me who have already read the following books. But it sure feels like it. Even after finishing the book, it left me with this forboding feeling in my gut, that tingleling that just tells you something bad is going to happen.I think something bad happened to every one of my favorite characters. Every. Single. One. Except for Daenerys, as she didn't get a lot of action in this book I think. In fact, she didn't do much at all. Considering the sheer amount of characters, though, it's not surprising that not a lot happens if you only take one character's timeline into account. But for the reader, it sure doesn't feel that way. To me, it felt a little as if a giant family was on fire and you had one bucket of water and had to decide which fire to quench, knowing that everyone else was going to suffer for your decision. However, I was completely bored with Jon Snow's chapters. The danger he has found beyond the wall doesn't seem as pressing to me and I'm not interested in dozens of chapters where he rides around in the wilderness because that's what it felt like and that's why this book got only 4 stars. There were lots of Jon chapters in comparison to, say, Sansa who I was much more interested in. So yeah. I liked it a lot. But there were these little quirks that just ... put me off a little and hindered my reading speed.
GShuk on LibraryThing 29 days ago
I am hooked on the series. The second audio did not disappoint and look forward to seeing it on TV. Only saw the first TV episode which seemed to take more liberties than the first book did.
Daniel.Estes on LibraryThing 29 days ago
A Clash of Kings begins right where the previous novel, the enthralling Game of Thrones, leaves off. New characters are introduced from the island of Dragonstone, where the late King Robert's younger brother, Stannis Baratheon, rules. He lays claim to the throne of Westeros by rites and charges Robert's primary heir, son Joffrey, as illegitimate. The youngest Baratheon brother, Renly, also seeks the throne from his stronghold in the south. Newly crowned King Robb Stark rules in the north and is challenged by Tywin Lannister on the battlefield and Balon Greyjoy at sea. So many minor characters are brought into play that it's not a bad idea to keep a few notes while reading.This second installment from A Song of Ice and Fire definitely works best as a transitional setup for the larger, seven-volume story that George R. R. Martin is telling. The first half moves slowly as key players are put in position, and the second half delivers a handful of climactic punches. Don't expect many story arcs to be resolved by the book's end.
DocWalt10 on LibraryThing 29 days ago
As you continue with this series you come appreciate George Martin's amazing Character development. Without the Appendix keeping them straight is a challenge. Great story line and keeps you wanting more.
sneville on LibraryThing 29 days ago
Quite a good book so far, I'm almost done it. I find Martin's books start off very slowly and then your interest ramps up considerably as you continue. I also enjoy the multitude of character perspectives he uses. While it doesn't hinder the flow it's an effective tool to build tension and varied description viewpoints.